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Nancy Kulp-Buddy Ebsen Feud - 1984 Nancy Kulp and Buddy Ebsen starred together for nine seasons on The Beverly Hillbillies, one of the most popular sitcoms in television history. From 1962 to 1971 Kulp played prim bank secretary Miss Jane Hathaway. Ebsen played the patriarch of the oil-rich, unsophisticated Clampett clan. In 1984 Kulp, a Democrat, decided to run for Congress in her home state of Pennsylvania. She attempted to unseat popular 12-year Republican incumbent Bud Shuster in the state's 9th District. During the campaign, Kulp made an offhand remark that all the surviving cast members from The Beverly Hillbillies were supporting her. Ebsen, a lifelong Republican, wanted to set the record straight: He dispatched a note to Kulp from his California home. It read, "Hey Nancy, I love you dearly, but youíre too liberal for me. Iíve got to go with Bud Shuster." The rift between the two actors was further exacerbated when Ebsen did a radio spot for Shuster in which he reiterated his objections to Kulp's liberal politics. Kulp believed Ebsen's intrusion into Pennsylvania politics was "cruel." Embittered, she terminated their friendship. On election day Shuster soundly trounced Kulp by about a 2:1 margin. Apparently Kulp and Ebsen only reconciled shortly before Kulp's death from cancer in 1991.
Tags: Nancy  Kulp  Buddy  Ebsen  Beverly  Hillbillies  politics  feud 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 14984
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Frank Caday aka Sam Drucker Passes at Age 96 Frank Cady, 96, a character actor who played Hooterville general store proprietor Sam Drucker on the TV sitcoms "Green Acres" and "Petticoat Junction," died Friday in his home in Wilsonville, Ore., said his daughter, Catherine Turk. No specific cause was given. Like Mr. Haney, Eb Dawson, Hank Kimball and Arnold the Pig, Cady's Sam Drucker was a supporting cast member on "Green Acres" to lawyer Oliver Wendell Douglas and his socialite wife, Lisa, played by Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor, who had ditched the high life in New York City for the charms of a farm in Hooterville.
Tags: Frank  Cady,  Hooterville,  Sam  Drucker,  Green  Acres,  Petticoat  Junction,       
Added: 11th June 2012
Views: 2095
Rating:
Posted By: Old Fart
Taxi - Reverend Jim Drivers Exam One of the best written sitcoms ever was Taxi. In the show's first season, Christopher Lloyd appeared in one episode as "Reverend Jim," a burnt-out relic from the 1960s who was hastily procured to officiate at Latka's sham wedding. In the third episode of the second season Jim was brought back and made a regular character. In this famous scene, Jim applies for his driver's license so he can become a cabbie. The episode is titled "Reverend Jim: A Space Odyssey."
Tags: Taxi  Reverend  Jim  driving  test 
Added: 7th November 2012
Views: 3847
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bewitched - Final Scene Today we are used to favorite sitcoms ending their runs with big finishes. That seldom used to be the case. Here is the last scene of the 252nd and final episode of Bewitched. It was produced in December 1971 and aired in March 1972. The episode's title is "The Truth, and Nothing But the Truth, So Help Me Sam." It's ordinary plot revolves around a unicorn pin which, because of a spell that Endora has placed on it, compels any mortal close to it to always tell the truth. There is no farewell scene--just Samantha and Darrin fittingly expressing their love for each other as the episode ends. By 1972, Bewitched had been moved by ABC to a deadly Saturday time slot directly against All in the Family. Neverthless, it still attracted decent enough ratings. There were initial plans for a ninth season. However, Elizabeth Montgomery and her husband Bill Asher (who produced the show) were divorcing, so the continuation of Bewitched would have been awkward.
Tags: Bewitched  sitcom  final  scene  1972 
Added: 28th June 2013
Views: 2322
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Life With Lucy - Opening Credits After being away from sitcoms for 12 years, Lucille Ball returned to TV in the fall of 1986 with great fanfare at age 75 as the star of the ABC comedy Life With Lucy. (Here is the opening montage. The theme song was performed by Eydie Gorme.) Madelyn Davis and Bob Carroll, who had written scripts for I Love Lucy, were the show's producers. The premise of the show was that the recently widowed Lucy Barker decides to help out at the hardware store her husband ran. The only problem was she had had nothing to do with the store while her husband was alive, so she was clueless about everything. Eighty-year-old Gale Gordon also came out of retirement to play Lucy's husband's business partner Curtis McGibbon. Lucy had just moved in with her daughter Margo's family. Margo was married to Curtis's son, a law student. At the end of the first episode Curtis moves into the same house too. Got it? After a decent showing in the ratings for the first episode, Life With Lucy steadily plummeted downward. Even guest appearances by John Ritter and Audrey Meadows failed to halt the show's decline. After eight weeks it was dismally ranked 73rd out of 76 shows. Even though ABC had committed to 22 episodes, the scripts for 14 shows had been written, and 13 had been filmed, ABC pulled the plug after the eighth episode aired. Lucy was said to have been heartbroken that the public no longer wanted to see her on TV. She died about 30 months later.
Tags: Life  With  Lucy  sitcom  Lucille  Ball 
Added: 5th February 2015
Views: 930
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Bub OCasey My Three Sons was one of televisions's longest-running sitcoms, airing 380 episodes over 12 seasons. It first aired on ABC from 1960 through 1965 and then on CBS from 1965 through 1972. The premise of the show was that Stephen Douglas (played by Fred MacMurray) was a widowed aeronautical engineer with three sons whose ages spanned about 12 years. We never learn much about his deceased wife--not even her first name. With Stephen Douglas often busy, his father-in-law, crusty but good-natured Bub O'Casey, was brought into the family fold to be the equivalent of the 'mother': the person who would cook, clean, shop, do laundry, mend clothes, and so forth. Bub was played by William Frawley who had earlier gained TV fame as Fred Mertz on I Love Lucy in the 1950s. The show was immediately popular but never quite managed to crack the Nielsen top 10 in ratings. Fred MacMurray, who was once the highest paid actor in Hollywood, only agreed to be in the show if he could shoot all his scenes in three months. ABC agreed to this unusual demand. This meant the scripts for an entire season had to be prepared so MacMurray's scenes could all be shot over the space of three months and then pieced together with scenes involving only the other cast members who had a standard shooting schedule. Four seasons into the show, a problem arose: Frawley's health was declining to the point where ABC could not get him insured in case it had to pay for an entire season of episodes to be re-shot with a replacement if Frawley died or was incapacitated by illness. Thus ABC felt it was financially prudent to unceremoniously drop Frawley from the cast midway through the 1964-65 season. (It was explained that Bub had gone to Ireland to look after his 104-year-old Aunt Katie.) Enter William Demarest, who took on the role of Charley O'Casey--Bub's seafaring brother. He was persuaded to become the new Mr. Mom at the Douglas home and proved to be even more grumpy than Bub, but just as lovable deep down. Bub was seldom mentioned again once Uncle Charley entered the scene. Apparently Frawley resented Demarest for replacing him in the cast. Because only the 1965 to 1970 episodes are widely syndicated, many newer fans of My Three Sons are utterly unaware of Bub O'Casey. The insurance concerns were very valid: Frawley died suddenly in March 1966 at age 79.
Tags: Bub  OCasey  My  Three  Sons  William  Frawley 
Added: 9th March 2015
Views: 1927
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Don Drysdale Warns Greg Brady About Pro Baseball Some lessons from old TV sitcoms are timeless. Some aren't. In this clip from a 1970 episode of the Brady Bunch (titled The Dropout), recently retired superstar pitcher Don Drysdale warns Greg Brady that being a pro ballplayer isn't all it's cracked up to be. Considering what the average MLB player earned back then, he had a point. Today however...
Tags: Don  Drysdale  Brady  Bunch 
Added: 25th May 2015
Views: 1101
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
He And She - Failed Sitcom 1967 In the fall of 1967 CBS introduced one of its first urbane, "sophisticated" situation comedies--He & She. It flopped despite having an excellent cast. Real-life husband and wife Richard Benjamin and Paula Prentiss played Dick and Paula Hollister. Dick was a cartoonist; Paula worked for Travelers' Aid in New York City. Dick's creation of Jetman was turned into a TV series with Jack Cassidy playing the role. Even though it had two blockbuster hits (The Beverly Hillbillies and Green Acres) preceding it in CBS' Wednesday night lineup, viewers generally did not stick around for He & She. Benjamin believed that the two popular lead-in shows actually served to hurt He & She because its urban comedy was a world apart from that of the rural sitcoms. Twenty-six episodes were made in the lone season it aired. Here is the opening montage.
Tags: He  and  She  CBS  sitcom  flop 
Added: 6th November 2015
Views: 935
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Mr Barnsdahl Fans of The Lucy Show immediately think of Mr. Mooney (played by Gale Gordon) as the tight-fisted banker with whom Lucy Carmichael constantly clashed. However, Mr. Mooney was a second-season replacement for Mr. Barnsdahl, played by Charles Lane. Lane was a longtime character actor who specialized in playing officious, unlikable authority figures. A familiar face for generations of TV and movie fans, Lane's acting career began in 1929. Four years later he was a founding member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG). He was a favorite of director Frank Capra and became a good friend of Lucille Ball. He had roles in several episodes of I Love Lucy. (He was a fellow expectant father in the 1953 episode when Little Ricky is born.) When Lucy's second sitcom series, The Lucy Show, began in the fall of 1962, she played a widow who lived off a trust fund left to her by her late husband. Lane played Mr. Barnsdahl, the humorless, no-nonsense banker who managed the fund. Lane appeared in just four episodes, however. According to one book about Lucille Ball's sitcoms, Lane had difficulty remembering his lines when performing in front of a live audience and happily stepped aside for Gordon. (Shortly thereafter Lane was cast as heartless railroad official Homer Bedloe on Petticoat Junction--which was not shot in front of a live audience.) Another explanation for Lane's departure is that he was only an interim character until Gale Gordon--Lucy's first choice to play her banker--was freed from other contractual obligations and could become the miserly Mr. Mooney whom every Lucy fan remembers. Lane lived to be a centenarian, dying at age 102 in 2007. His last acting credit was as a narrator at age 101. He was the oldest SAG member at the time of his death.
Tags: Charles  Lane  Lucy  Show  Mr  Barnsdahl 
Added: 4th April 2018
Views: 515
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Second Hundred Years - Sitcom Flop The 1960s were famous for producing far-fetched sitcoms. Here is another that aired briefly on ABC: The Second Hundred Years. Starring Monte Markham and Arthur O'Connell, its crazy plot had O'Connell playing Edwin Carpenter, a man whose gold-prospecting father (Luke) was swept by an avalanche into an Alaskan glacier in 1900. Another avalanche 67 years later conveniently exposed Luke's frozen carcass. Miraculously he was revived--without having aged in the intervening years! Thus Luke now physically resembled his 33-year-old grandson, Ken. (Luke and Ken were played by the same actor, of course, Monte Markham.) Furthermore, for national security reasons, the general public was not allowed to know about this remarkable incident. The show's plots frequently focused on Ken and Luke being able to take the other's place in social situations, and in the culture shock Luke experienced in suddenly going from 1900 to 1967. (In one episode Luke saw a go-go dancer in a cage, thought she was being held against her will, and "rescued" her.) The Second Hundred Years premiered on September 3, 1967 to fairly strong ratings, but it was universally panned by TV critics. Within a very short time it dropped into the bottom 25 network shows and was cancelled after 26 episodes. Here is a promotional clip that aired on ABC just before its premier.
Tags: Monte  Markham  The  Second  Hundred  Years  sitcom  Arthur  O 
Added: 5th April 2018
Views: 579
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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