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Harold Lloyd Safety Last This is the final 10-1/2 minutes of Safety Last!--a silent 1923 Harold Lloyd film. Lloyd, despite his meek appearance, excelled at physical comedy. In this movie Lloyd has to take the place of a friend who was supposed to do a human fly act and climb the outside of the office building where Lloyd works. This is real, folks! There was no trick photography. Lloyd used a stunt double for the long shots in this clip, but all the harrowing closeups were of Lloyd. Lloyd had only a thin mattress on the sidewalk if he happened to fall. Safety last, indeed!
Tags: Harold  Lloyd 
Added: 2nd October 2007
Views: 2326
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Posted By: Lava1964
WHAM O WHEELIE BAR TV COMMERCIAL 1966 I'm the wheelie king,And the claim that this is the only way to do a real wheelie is false!You must lean back much further to achieve the center of gravity,to the point of flipping backwards for the balance required to keep riding on.That's why the kid is standing on the seat leaning back in order to keep it up.I have tried these and they don't work for any long period.Wheras I could ride for miles!Wheelie 101 And also that's the little old lady from Pasadena that's on the Jan and Dean album cover.I'm told
Tags: ed  roth  sting-ray  60s  dragster  surfing  surfer  skateboarding  sidewalk  super  Krateschwinn  frisbee 
Added: 2nd January 2008
Views: 2344
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Posted By: tommy7
Dovima Dovima or Dorothy Virginia Margaret Juba was a supermodel during the 1950s. Born in New York City, Dovima was discovered by an editor at Vogue on the sidewalk of New York, and had a photo shoot with Irving Penn the following day. . . i love these fairy tale discoveries!
Tags: dovima 
Added: 26th May 2009
Views: 1239
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Posted By: Teresa
Our Gang - Waldo Darwood Kaye played Waldo in the Our Gang shorts from 1937 to 1940. The bookish and officious Waldo was usually a minor character, although he also pursued the fair Darla. His first speaking part was in Hearts are Thumps (1937). His last was Waldo's Last Stand (1940). He had a few movie roles outside of the Our Gang series, including one alongside Lucille Ball. Following his acting days, Darwood became an ordained minister with the Seventh-Day Adventist church. He worked at various missions, including ones in Thailand. Sadly Darwood met a tragic end. On May 15, 2002, he was struck and killed by a hit-and-run driver while walking on a sidewalk near his home in Riverside, California. He was 72 years old.
Tags: Our  Gang  Waldo  Darwood  Kaye 
Added: 1st December 2009
Views: 1317
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 1574
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Posted By: Lava1964
Spittoons They'd be considered very unhygienic today, but in their day spittoons were actually a step up in public health. Used as a receptacle for spit generated by chewing tobacco, in the late 19th century spittoons became a common sight in pubs, brothels, saloons, hotels, stores, banks, railway carriages, and other places where people--especially adult men--gathered. Although brass was the most common material for spitoons, other materials ranged from basic functional iron to crafted cut glass and fine porcelain. At higher-class hotels, spittoons were often elaborately decorated. Spittoons were flat-bottomed, often weighted to minimize tipping over, and commonly had an interior lip to make spilling less likely even if they did tip over. Occasionally they'd have lids. Some had holes with an accompanying plug, to aid in draining and cleaning. Use of spittoons was considered an advance of public manners and health, intended to replace previously common habit of spitting on floors, streets, and sidewalks. Many jurisdictions passed laws against spitting in public--other than into a spittoon. Boy Scout troops organized campaigns to paint "Do not Spit on the Sidewalk" notices on city sidewalks. In 1909, Cincinnati scout troops allied with members of the Anti-Tuberculosis League painted thousands of such messages in a single night. A punny mass-produced sign common in saloons read: 'If you expect to rate as a gentleman, do not expectorate on the floor.' Spittoons were also useful for people suffering from tuberculosis who would cough up phlegm. Public spittoons would sometimes contain a solution of an antiseptic such as carbolic acid with the aim of limiting transmission of disease. With the start of the 20th century, medical doctors urged tuberculosis sufferers to use personal pocket spittoons instead of public ones; these were jars with tight lids which people could carry. After the deadly 1918 flu epidemic, both hygiene and etiquette advocates began to disparage public use of the spittoon, and use began to decline. Chewing gum replaced tobacco as the favorite chew of the younger generation. Cigarettes were considered more hygienic than spit-inducing chewing tobacco. While it was still not unusual to see spittoons in some public places as late as the 1930s, vast numbers of old brass spittoons met their ends when they were melted down during the scrap metal drives of the Second World War.
Tags: spittoons  hygiene  tobacco 
Added: 17th July 2012
Views: 3482
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Posted By: Lava1964

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