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Babe Ruth sings Another musical performance by someone totally out of his element: From the 1937 Vitaphone short film Home Run on the Keys, Babe Ruth sings--sort of.
Tags: Babe  Ruth  sings 
Added: 7th October 2007
Views: 1939
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Truth or Consequences 1966 A short clip showing the introduction of a 1966 episode of Truth or Consequences. A youthful Bob Barker is the host.
Tags: Truth  or  Consequences  Bob  Barker 
Added: 8th October 2007
Views: 1911
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Marilyn Monroe funeral A short clip of the scene surrounding Marilyn Monroe's funeral.
Tags: Marilyn  Monroe  funeral 
Added: 8th October 2007
Views: 1580
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Jan and Dean Surf City Video Jan Berry and Dean Torrence, both born in Los Angeles, began singing together as a duo after football practice at University High School. They first performed on stage as The Barons at a high school dance. Their first commercial success was "Jennie Lee" (1958), a top 10 ode to a local, Hollywood, Ca, burlesque performer that Jan Berry recorded with fellow Baron Arnie Ginsburg. "Jan & Arnie" released three singles in all. After Torrence returned from a stint in the army reserves, Jan Berry and Dean Torrence began to make music as "Jan and Dean". Jan and Dean's commercial peak came between 1963 and 1966, as the duo scored an impressive sixteen Top 40 hits on the Billboard and Cash Box magazine charts, with a total of twenty-six chart hits over eight years. Jan and Brian Wilson collaborated on roughly a dozen hits and album cuts for Jan and Dean, including the number one national hit "Surf City" in 1963. Subsequent top 10 hits included "Drag City" (1963), "The Little Old Lady from Pasadena" (1964), and the eerily portentous "Dead Man's Curve" (1964). On April 12,1966, Berry received severe head injuries in a motor vehicle accident, ironically just a short distance from Dead Man's Curve in Los Angeles, two years after the song had become a hit. He was angry while driving because he had learned he was to be inducted into the military when had already completed two years of medical school, which he had been secretly attending. Berry had also separated from his girlfriend of seven years. As a result of his accident, Jan and Dean did not perform again until the mid-1970s, after the release of the feature film Deadman's Curve in 1978, which opened the doors for Jan and Dean to launch a successful and amazing comeback especially for Jan Berry. On February 3, 1978, CBS aired a made-for-TV movie about the duo entitled Deadman's Curve. The biopic starred Richard Hatch as Jan Berry and Bruce Davison as Dean Torrence, as well as appearances by Dick Clark, Wolfman Jack, and Mike Love and Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys. Following the release of the film, the duo made steps toward an official comeback that year, including touring with the Beach Boys. In the early 1980s, while Berry struggled to overcome drug addiction, Torrence toured briefly as "Mike & Dean," with Mike Love of the Beach Boys. But Berry got sober, beating the odds once again, and the duo reunited for good. Jan and Dean continued to tour on their own throughout the 1980s, 1990s, and into the new millennium with 1960s nostalgia providing them with a ready audience. On August 31, 1991, Berry married Gertie Filip at The Stardust Convention Centre in Las Vegas, Nevada. Torrence was Berry's best man at the wedding. Jan and Dean ended with Jan Berry's death on March 26, 2004, at the age of 62. Berry was an organ donor, and his body was cremated. On April 18, 2004, a "Celebration of Life" was held in Jan's memory at The Roxy Theatre on the Sunset Strip in West Hollywood, California. Celebrities attending the event included Dean Torrence, Lou Adler, Jill Gibson, and Nancy Sinatra. Also present were many family members, friends, and musicians associated with Jan and Dean and the Beach Boys.
Tags: jan  and  dean  surf  city  video 
Added: 15th October 2007
Views: 4720
Rating:
Posted By: Sophia
Charlie Rich From a concert back in 1975 which was performed over in the uk charlie sings big boss man mohair sam behind closed doors although mohair sam is a short song i love this version watch as charlie pulls funny faces at the audience.
Tags: charlie  rich  1975 
Added: 22nd October 2007
Views: 1780
Rating:
Posted By: dave
John Denver Rocky Mountain High In 1972, Denver scored his first top ten album, with Rocky Mountain High, while its title track reached the Top Ten in 1973. In 1974, "Sunshine on My Shoulders" and "Annie's Song" both went to number one, and "Back Home Again" made it to number five. In 1975, he again had two number ones, "Thank God I'm A Country Boy" and "Calypso/I'm Sorry," and a top twenty hit, "Sweet Surrender." Key to Denver's success were his many appearances on television, which in the pre-MTV era of the 1970s, with his long blond hair, embroidered 'western' shirts, affable manner & granny glasses, made him one of the first truly "tele-genic" pop stars. In subsequent years, Denver had a lower-profile career. He had a few more U.S. Top 30 hits as the 1970s ended, but nothing to match the success he enjoyed earlier. As his career slowed down, Denver focused more on humanitarian and sustainability work. He worked extensively on conservation projects and helped to create the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. On October 12, 1997, Denver was killed when the Long-EZ aircraft he was piloting crashed just off the coast of California at Pacific Grove, shortly after taking off from the Monterey Peninsula Airport.
Tags: john  denver  rocky  mountain  high 
Added: 31st October 2007
Views: 2740
Rating:
Posted By: Babs64
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1176
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Comedy of Nichols and May This is one of the funniest sketches I've ever seen. It's about as close to the mother-child relationship as you can get. Mike Nichols and Elaine May created perfectly improvised scenes that were outrageously funny, yet simply understated. Their dry wit and wry satire allowed them to lampoon faceless bureaucracy and such previously sacrosanct institutions as hospitals, politics, funeral homes, and even motherhood. Like other great comedy duos, Nichols and May perfectly complemented each other. They seemed so attuned and at ease with each other that the mis-communication they often based their skits on were all the funnier. Within a short while of arriving in New York, they were the talk of the town, appearing on The Steve Allen Show, introducing a nationwide audience to a humor unlike any on television. Nichols and May spent much of the next three years traveling the country performing together on stage, radio, and television. In 1960, "An Evening with Mike Nichols and Elaine May" had opened on Broadway to rave reviews, but by 1961, Nichols and May would announce the end of their partnership. Interested in pursuing individual careers, the two left behind one of the most popular and imitated comedy acts of its time. Mike Nichols has directed and produced a variety of hit films, such as The Graduate, Silkwood, The Birdcage, Primary Colors, and The Remains of the Day. Elaine May is a two-time Academy Award nominated director, screenwriter, and actress.
Tags: mike  nichols  elaine  may  improvisational  comedy 
Added: 6th November 2007
Views: 3560
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2311
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Was Dorothy Kilgallen Murdered Here's one for you conspiracy theorists to ponder: Was newspaper columnist Dorothy Kilgallen murdered? Famous for her role as a permanent panelist on the CBS show What's My Line? and for her Voice of Broadway entertainment/gossip column in the New York Journal American, Kilgallen often covered major news events--especially murder trials. She reported on the Sam Sheppard murder trial and the Lindbergh kidnapping case, among others. She also expressed serious doubts about the Warren Commission's investigation of JFK's murder. Kilgallen interviewed Jack Ruby in prison shortly before her death on November 8, 1965. Just hours after she had appeared live and quite chipper on What's My Line? from 10:30 to 11 p.m., the 52-year-old Kilgallen was found dead in her Manhattan home, fully clothed, sitting up on a bed in which she did not sleep still wearing the makeup and false eyelashes she had on the previous night. (Dorothy always removed her false eyelashes before retiring for the night.) A book she had finished reading months ago was on her bed. She needed glasses to read but her spectacles were nowhere near her. Although alcohol and barbiturates were found in her blood stream and a mysterious pink liquid in her stomach, Kilgallen's official cause of death was listed as undetermined. At least three different people in the household claim to have been the first to discover Dorothy dead on the bed: Her secretary, her hairdresser, and her maid. Reports of the time when Dorothy's body was discovered vary wildly--anywhere from about 10:30 a.m. to about 3 p.m. The coroner who did the paperwork was responsible for autopsies in Brooklyn--not Manhattan. Kilgallen's notes from her interview with Jack Ruby were never found--leading conspiracy theorists to wonder whether she had been silenced.
Tags: Dorothy  Kilgallen  death  conspiracy 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2746
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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