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Louella Parsons on Judy Garland i wish Louella Parsons "GOOD NEWS" from a 1949 MODERN SCREEN magazine had indeed been correct . . . she died twenty years later of an accidental overdose of barbiturates. . " WHAT IS really the matter with Judy Garland? That is the question hurled at me everywhere I go. All right, let's get at it. Judy is a nervous and frail little girl who suffers from a sensitiveness almost bordering on neurosis. It is her particular temperament to be either walking in the clouds with excitement or way down in the dumps with worry. The least thing to go wrong leaves her sleepless and shattered. She has never learned the philosophy of "taking it easy." Last year, when she was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she got in the habit of taking sleeping pills -- too many of them -- to get the rest she had to have. I'm not revealing any secrets telling you that. It was printed at the time. But for a highly emotional and highly strung girl to completely abandon sedatives, as Judy attempted to do when she realized she was taking too many, puts a terrific strain on the nervous system. The trouble is, Judy does not take enough time to rest. The minute she starts feeling better she wants to go back to work. She cried like a baby when she learned she was not strong enough to make The Barkleys of Broadway with Fred Astaire so soon following The Pirate and Easter Parade. "I'm missing the greatest role of my career," she sobbed. With Judy -- each role is always the greatest. Sometimes I believe Judy's frail little form is packed with too much talent for her own good. She is an artist, and I mean ARTIST, at too many things. She sings wonderfully and dances almost as well. And as for her acting -- well, listen to what Joseph Schenk, one of the really big men of our industry and head of 20th Century Fox (not Judy's studio) has to say. I sat next to Joe the night we saw Easter Parade. He told me, "Judy Garland is one of the great artists of the screen. She can do anything. I consider her as fine an actress as she is a musical comedy star. There is no drama I wouldn't trust her with. She could play such drama as Seventh Heaven as sensitively as a Janet Gaynor or a Helen Mencken." And I agree with every word Joe said. I am happy to tell you as I report the Hollywood news this month that Judy is coming along wonderfully, resting and getting back the bloom of health. Soon we will have her back on the screen -- her long battle with old Devil Nerves behind her and forgotten."
Tags: modern  screen  magazine  judy  garland  louella  parsons 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 1521
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Posted By: Teresa
One Froggy Evening My choice for the best Warner Bros. cartoon ever made: One Froggy Evening (1955). It's the story of greed, disappointment, a shattered life--and the devious singing frog responsible for it all.
Tags: One  Froggy  Evening  cartoon 
Added: 8th October 2007
Views: 1638
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Posted By: Lava1964
Darryl Dawkins Shatters Backboards In the space of a month in 1979 Darryl Dawkins of the Philadelphia 76ers twice shattered NBA backboards with his power dunks. Here they are.
Tags: Darryl  Dawkins  backboards  shattered 
Added: 6th January 2008
Views: 2412
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wilbur Wood SI Cover A friend recently asked me a great baseball trivia question: Which MLB pitcher holds the post-1900 record for most games started over two consecutive seasons? My gut reaction was it had to be someone in the first decade of the twentieth century. When he said it was set after 1970, I correctly guessed Wilbur Wood of the Chicago White Sox. Wood, pictured here on a 1973 Sports Illustrated cover, was a steady knuckleball hurler who started 49 games in 1972 and 48 in 1973 to set the record of 97 starts over two consecutive seasons! Wood's career pretty much ended in May 1976 when a line drive shattered his kneecap. After a long rehab session, Wood returned to baseball but was not nearly as skillful on the mound as he had been before the injury.
Tags: Wilbur  Wood  Sports  Illustrated  cover 
Added: 27th April 2009
Views: 545
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 917
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Posted By: Lava1964

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