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Louella Parsons on Judy Garland i wish Louella Parsons "GOOD NEWS" from a 1949 MODERN SCREEN magazine had indeed been correct . . . she died twenty years later of an accidental overdose of barbiturates. . " WHAT IS really the matter with Judy Garland? That is the question hurled at me everywhere I go. All right, let's get at it. Judy is a nervous and frail little girl who suffers from a sensitiveness almost bordering on neurosis. It is her particular temperament to be either walking in the clouds with excitement or way down in the dumps with worry. The least thing to go wrong leaves her sleepless and shattered. She has never learned the philosophy of "taking it easy." Last year, when she was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she got in the habit of taking sleeping pills -- too many of them -- to get the rest she had to have. I'm not revealing any secrets telling you that. It was printed at the time. But for a highly emotional and highly strung girl to completely abandon sedatives, as Judy attempted to do when she realized she was taking too many, puts a terrific strain on the nervous system. The trouble is, Judy does not take enough time to rest. The minute she starts feeling better she wants to go back to work. She cried like a baby when she learned she was not strong enough to make The Barkleys of Broadway with Fred Astaire so soon following The Pirate and Easter Parade. "I'm missing the greatest role of my career," she sobbed. With Judy -- each role is always the greatest. Sometimes I believe Judy's frail little form is packed with too much talent for her own good. She is an artist, and I mean ARTIST, at too many things. She sings wonderfully and dances almost as well. And as for her acting -- well, listen to what Joseph Schenk, one of the really big men of our industry and head of 20th Century Fox (not Judy's studio) has to say. I sat next to Joe the night we saw Easter Parade. He told me, "Judy Garland is one of the great artists of the screen. She can do anything. I consider her as fine an actress as she is a musical comedy star. There is no drama I wouldn't trust her with. She could play such drama as Seventh Heaven as sensitively as a Janet Gaynor or a Helen Mencken." And I agree with every word Joe said. I am happy to tell you as I report the Hollywood news this month that Judy is coming along wonderfully, resting and getting back the bloom of health. Soon we will have her back on the screen -- her long battle with old Devil Nerves behind her and forgotten."
Tags: modern  screen  magazine  judy  garland  louella  parsons 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 2828
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Posted By: Teresa
Howard Cosell picks Foreman to beat Ali Like most boxing fans, Howard Cosell figured 32-year-old Muhammad Ali had no chance to regain the world heavyweight title whe he stepped into the ring to face 25-year-old George Foreman in Zaire in 1974. (Ali won by an eighth-round knockout.) In 1964 Cosell picked Sonny Liston to beat Ali (then Cassius Clay) in one round. Clay won the title that night when Liston failed to come out for the seventh round.
Tags: Muhammad  Ali  Howard  Cosell 
Added: 17th October 2007
Views: 2618
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnny Rivers BABY I NEED YOUR LOVIN Here's another performer whose career was launched with the help of Ed Sullivan. Johnny Rivers was born John Henry Ramistella, on Nov 7, 1942, in New York. He was versatile enough to do folk songs, blues, covers of old-time rock 'n' roll songs, and some original material, all of them in his own unique style. Rivers's greatest success came in the mid and late 1960s with a string of hit songs (including "Seventh Son," "Poor Side of Town" and "Secret Agent Man"), but he has continued to record and perform to the present.
Tags: johnny  rivers  baby  i  need  your  lovin  ed  sullivan  show  60s  music 
Added: 7th November 2007
Views: 3652
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Posted By: Naomi
Steve Smith hockey blooper On April 30, 1986 Steve Smith of the Edmonton Oilers committed the ultimate hockey gaffe--he scored on his own net. Hey, it was only the deciding goal in the seventh game of a Stanley Cup playoff series!
Tags: Steve  Smith  goal  blooper 
Added: 2nd January 2008
Views: 1992
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Posted By: Lava1964
Anchors Aweigh Gene Kelly had a novel idea for his seventh film, the 1945 production Anchor's Aweigh. He wanted to dance with an animated character. As luck would have it a partnership of animators, William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, who had arrived at MGM around the same time as Kelly, had created the cat and mouse duo Tom and Jerry. In 1944, when Kelly was looking for a dancing partner, the Tom and Jerry series was riding high having just received back to back Academy Award wins for Animated Short Film. Jerry therefore was an obvious next choice. Gene Kelly and Jerry Mouse made cinematic history as the first dance partnership between a live person and an animated character. This is also pretty much the only time you will hear Jerry Mouse speak and sing.
Tags: anchors  aweigh  gene  kelly  jerry  mouse  live  action  animation 
Added: 29th January 2008
Views: 2077
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Posted By: Naomi
Parachutist Disrupts Heavyweight Title Fight I thought I'd seen every weird occurrence at a sports event until I saw this. During a 1993 bout between Evander Holyfield and Riddick Bowe for the world havyweight title at an outdoor venue in Las Vegas, a parachutist attempted to descend into the ring in the seventh round. His chute snagged and he became entangled in the ropes. Reports say Bowe's entourage gave the intruder a pretty good pummeling before security staff intervened.
Tags: parachutist  Bowe  Holyfield  boxing 
Added: 14th February 2008
Views: 1526
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Posted By: Lava1964
1952 World Series Game 7 Vintage TV coverage of the seventh game of the 1952 World Series between the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees. Watch Mickey Mantle belt a homer over Ebbets Field's right field wall!
Tags: World  Series  baseball 
Added: 6th March 2008
Views: 3958
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Posted By: Lava1964
Walter Johnson One of my all-time favorite baseball players: Walter Johnson of the Washington Senators. The scouting report on Johnson's blazing fastball noted, 'You can't hit what you can't see.' Once Johnson pitched three complete-game shutouts in a single weekend. For years his lifetime total of 3,508 strikeouts seemed insurmountable. Johnson retired in 1927. It took nearly 50 years for another pitcher to reach 3,000 strikeouts. Johnson became a beloved baseball figure--largely because he had the misfortune to spend his entire career with the lowly Senators. In 1924, when Johnson finally got to pitch in a World Series at age 36, the public rejoiced when he won the seventh and decisive game to give Washington its only World Series triumph.
Tags: Walter  Johnson  baseball 
Added: 17th July 2008
Views: 1287
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Bartman Incident The most infamous example of a sports fan influencing the outcome of a game occurred on October 14, 2003. It was the sixth game of the National League Championship Series. The hard-luck Chicago Cubs led the Florida Marlins three games to two and 3-0 in the top of the eighth inning. With the Cubs just five outs away from advancing to the World Series for the first time since 1945, a foul ball drifted one row into Wrigley Field's seats along the third base line. Cubs' left fielder Moises Alou drifted over to make the catch, but spectator Steve Bartman--and several other fans--tried to catch the ball. Bartman (shown here with his arms outstretched) got his hands on it briefly, thus preventing Alou from having a chance to make the catch. Fan interference could not be called because the ball was actually over the seating area. Bartman was escorted from Wrigley Field to protect him from furious fellow Cub fans. Six police cars surrounded his home. Bartman has been in hiding ever since. The Marlins ended up scoring eight runs that inning and won the game 8-3. They also won the seventh game of the NLCS and the 2003 World Series.
Tags: baseball  Steve  Bartman  incident 
Added: 8th September 2008
Views: 3680
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Posted By: Lava1964
1965 Stanley Cup Final Game 7 The 1964-65 NHL season came down to a deciding seventh game of the finals at the Montreal Forum on May 1, 1965 to decide the Stanley Cup winner. Montreal beat Chicago 4-0 that night. Here is Jean Beliveau's goal 14 seconds into the game that turned out to be the clincher. The announcer is Danny Gallivan of Hockey Night In Canada.
Tags: NHL  Stanley  Cup  Jean  Beliveau  goal 
Added: 7th December 2008
Views: 3143
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Posted By: Lava1964

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