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Little Rascals This clip is odd for a couple of reasons: It's been colorized and the dialogue is in German! However, the important part--Alfalfa singing Let Me Call You Sweetheart--is in English. This is from the episode Hearts Are Thumps (1937) in which Alfalfa's buddies, angry that he has betrayed the principles of the He-Man Woman-Haters Club, sabotage his lunch with soap.
Tags: Little  Rascals  Alfalfa  sings 
Added: 17th October 2007
Views: 3055
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1144
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Hogans Heroes Flaming Arrow My favorite episode of Hogan's Heroes: Drums Along The Dusseldorf! In this episode the prisoners attempt to use Sgt. Carter's archery skills to sabotage a passing German truck carrying jet fuel. Here's the climactic 6.5 minutes of it. Lots of laughs. It first aired on March 30, 1968.
Tags: Hogans  Heroes  flaming  arrow 
Added: 14th December 2008
Views: 1349
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Cynthia Lynn Lovely Cynthia Lynn (pictured here in a CBS publicity photo with Bob Crane) played Fraulein Helga, Colonel Klink's secretary, in the first season of Hogan's Heroes (1965-66). In the series' pilot episode, Helga unabashedly works with the prisoners to sabotage the German war effort. In the first season however, Helga only assists Hogan and his cronies with small favors usually paid for with bribes of luxury items. The next season, Lynn was suddenly replaced by Klink's new secretary, Fraulein Hilda, played by Sigrid Valdis (who later became Bob Crane's second wife!). Why was Lynn replaced? No one has ever satisfactorily answered that question for Hogan's Heroes buffs. One persistent rumor had Lynn engaging in an off-screen affair with the married Crane. When the romance became known, Lynn quit the show. Lynn did return a few times late in the show's run in bit parts.
Tags: Cynthia  Lynn  Hogans  Heroes  Helga 
Added: 15th June 2010
Views: 4042
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
USS Maine Baseball Team The American battleship USS Maine mysteriously exploded in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898. About three-quarters of the ship's crew perished. Only 16 sailors onboard were completely uninjured. Accusations of sabotage led to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. (Evidence from modern investigations of the wreck suggests that a spontaneous internal explosion of coal near the ship's magazine likely caused the explosion--not sabotage.) Be that as it may, here is a photo of the USS Maine's baseball team. The man standing at the top left, J.H. Bloomer, was the only team member to survive the explosion.
Tags: USS  Maine  baseball  team 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 1746
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Sgt Kinchloe Ivan Dixon played prisoner of war Sgt. James Kinchloe on the CBS sitcom Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1970. By rank, Sgt. Kinchloe (nicknamed "Kinch") was third in command of the prisoners who stealthily engaged in sabotage and espionage capers to thwart the German war machine. Sgt. Kinchloe was a "communicatins specialist" whose typical job was to send and decode radio messages. After five seasons, Dixon grew tired of the role and sought more challenging TV and movie assignments, including directing. He once complained to the producers of Hogan's Heroes that only a few of the episodes centered around Kinch and that his most common line was "Message from London, Colonel." He left the show after season five concluded in 1970. For the final season, a new black prisoner, Cpl. Richard Baker (played by Kenneth Washington), replaced Kinch and took over his position as the Heroes' communications specialist. Kinch's absence from the cast was never explained. Based on the show's premise and ongoing plot, Sgt. Kinchloe's total disappearance is hard to accept. The prisoners made certain that Stalag 13 was supposedly "escape-proof" to ensure that the easily manipulated Colonel Klink would appear efficient and remain as the camp's commander. Thus one would think that Kinchloe did not escape. So what the heck happened to him?
Tags: Kinchloe  Hogans  Heroes  Ivan  DIxon 
Added: 5th November 2014
Views: 1668
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Oregon Poisoned Eggs Accident - 1942 On Wednesday, November 18, 1942 a horrible mistake killed 47 patients at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem--a facility housing those afflicted with mental illnesses. An evening meal of scrambled eggs was being prepared by the two-person kitchen crew. The cooking staff had been much larger, but the manpower demands of the Second World War had reduced it to just head cook Mary O'Hare and her male assistant A.B. McKillop. Against hospital policy, McKillop designated a trusted patient, 27-year-old George A. Nosen, to go to a downstairs storage room to get a scoopful of powdered milk to add to the frozen egg yolks. Nosen entered the wrong room and brought back a six-pound scoop of roach poison from an unmarked bin. The roach poison contained huge amounts of sodium fluoride. In very tiny amounts, sodium fluoride is harmless. It is found in most toothpastes in minuscule amounts to strengthen teeth. However, even an amount as small as an aspirin can be deadly to a human. Within a short time of the eggs being served, patients became violently ill, some vomiting blood. By midnight 30 patients had died. The death toll eventually rose to 47. About 460 patients in total suffered some ill effects. McKillop quickly suspected something had gone terribly amiss because of the powdered milk. This was confirmed when Nosen showed him the bin where it had come from. Investigators were perplexed as the kitchen staff initially reported that nothing outside the norm had happened in preparing the meal. Beyond the hospital theories abounded about what may have caused the deaths. Some people blamed them on a deliberate act of malice by a homicidal patient. Others thought it was an extreme case of salmonella due to improper food storage. Still others thought it might be war-related sabotage as the frozen egg yolks were the same type that were being sent overseas to feed American troops. Eventually McKillop's conscience bothered him and he told the truth about Nosen mistaking the roach poison for powdered milk. McKillop wanted to be held solely responsible for the mishap, but he, O'Hare and Nosen were all arrested. They were never charged as a Grand Jury ruled the incident to have been merely a tragic accident--one that killed nearly four dozen innocent patients. Nosen remained an inmate at the hospital--where he was looked upon as a pariah--until his death in 1983 at age 68. He suffered a fatal heart attack while scuffling with a 75-year-old patient.
Tags: poisoned  eggs  Oregon  1942 
Added: 27th April 2015
Views: 1066
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 510
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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