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Fred Snodgrass 1912 World Series Goat This is a photo of the first in a long line of World Series 'goats'--ballplayers who made critical blunders in the spotlight of the Fall Classic. In 1912, Fred Snodgrass of the New York Giants dropped Clyde Engel's routine fly ball in the bottom of the 10th inning of the deciding game of the World Series. The muff led to the Boston Red Sox turning a one-run deficit into a stunning 3-2 win. Sports writers called it the '$30,000 muff' because that was the difference between the winners' share of the 1912 World Series receipts and the losers' share. Despite an enormously successful real estate career in California after he retired from baseball, Snodgrass could never escape his infamous error. On April 5, 1974, the headline of Snodgrass' obituary in the New York Times read, 'Snodgrass, 86, Dead. Ballplayer Muffed 1912 Fly.'
Tags: Fred  Snodgrass  baseball  goat 
Added: 21st March 2009
Views: 1474
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Posted By: Lava1964
 2000 Year Old Man The 2000 Year Old Man was a creation of Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner starting around 1961. Brooks played the oldest man in the world, interviewed by Reiner in a series of comedy routines that appeared on television as well as being made into a collection of records. Brooks would ad lib answers to topics such as the earliest known language ("basic Rock"), the creation of the Cross ("it was easier to put together than the Star of David"), and Joan of Arc ("Know her? I went with her!"). The inspiration for the skit was a tape-recorded exchange between Brooks and Reiner at a party. The tape recorder was brought in and the two of them had the party audience in stitches.
Tags: the  two  thousand  year  old  man  mel  brooks  carl  reiner  comedy 
Added: 12th November 2007
Views: 2753
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Posted By: Sophia
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2068
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Posted By: Lava1964
Diffrent Strokes cast photo This is a cast photo from Diff'rent Strokes, a popular NBC sitcom that ran from 1978 through 1985. The show was about a Park Avenue millionaire widower who decides to adopt two black kids. (I'm sure that happens all the time!) The cst members were Todd Bridges as Willis, Conrad Bain as Mr. Drummond, Dana Plato as Kimberley, and Gary Coleman as Arnold. Today the show is cynically remembered for the legal and social troubles that befell its youthful stars. A Johnny Carson Carnac routine summed it up best: The answer is coffee, donuts, and a Diff'rent Strokes cast member. The question is name three things you find in the back seat of a police car!
Tags: Diffrent  Strokes  cast 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 1411
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Posted By: Lava1964
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 348
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple Dances with Buddy Ebsen Shirley Temple and Buddy Ebsen dance 'At The Codfish Ball.' This is from the movie Captain January (1936). Given the huge disparity in size between the two of them, this must have been a tough number to choreograph! Apparently Shirley learned the routine perfectly in about an hour.
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Buddy  Ebsen  Captain  January 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 7486
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shirley Temple Military Man Dance When Hollywood was Hollywood! Eight-year-old Shirley Temple dances 'Military Man' with Alice Faye and Jack Haley in the final scene of Poor Little Rich Girl (1936). Shirley's fans generally consider this long and complex dance routine to be the toughest she was ever required to do. Shirley nails it, of course!
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Jack  Haley  Alice  Faye  Military  Man 
Added: 9th December 2007
Views: 2500
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lindbergh Kidnapping Case 1932 One of the most famous criminal cases in American history was the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh, Jr., son of the famous aviator. On March 1, 1932, sometime between 8 and 10 p.m., the toddler was snatched from his upstairs nursery at the Lindberghs' still-under-construction retreat home near Hopewell, New Jersey. A note in badly written English was found on the window sill. It demanded $50,000 in ransom for the safe return of the child. A crude homemade ladder was also found leaning against the house. There were few other clues. The case took an odd turn when a 72-year-old good samaritan named John F. Condon took out a newspaper ad volunteering to act as an intermediary to negotiate with the kidnappers. His offer was accepted but neither Lindbergh nor Condon immediately informed the police for fear of putting the child's life in danger. Eventually the money--much of it in rare gold certificates--was paid to a man in a cemetery but the child was not returned. Shortly afterward a child's body was found in a wooded area not far from the Lindbergh home. It was badly decomposed and was identified as the Lindbergh child based on a slight deformity on its right foot. The child had died from a severe skull fracture. Eventually Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant with a criminal record in his homeland, was tracked down for spending one of the gold certificates at a gas station. About $15,000 in ransom money was found in his house. Planks from his garage matched the wood used to make the crude ladder. Hauptmann proclaimed his innocence, claiming he was only holding the money for a man named Isador Fisch who had returned to Germany and died there. Hauptmann said he only began spending the money after learning of Fisch's death. Hauptmann was tried, found guilty, and executed in 1936. There is little doubt that Hauptmann was somehow connected with the kidnapping, but there are lingering suspicions that he was assisted by someone who knew the routine and the goings-on at the Lindbergh household. The Lindberghs were not even supposed to be at their Hopewell home on the night of the kidnapping. The kidnapper(s) also had to know precisely when and where the boy would be left unattended.
Tags: Lindbergh  kidnapping 
Added: 14th December 2007
Views: 1442
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mickey Rooneys Silent Film Days Mickey Rooney, whose real name was Joseph Yule, began performing at the age of fifteen months as part of his parents' vaudeville routine, wearing a specially tailored tuxedo. His parents separated in 1924. A year later, Mrs Yule moved with Joseph to Hollywood, where she managed a tourist home. Fontaine Fox had placed a newspaper ad for a dark haired child to play the role of "Mickey McGuire" in a series of short silent films, and, lacking the money to have her son's hair dyed, she took him to the audition after applying burnt cork to his scalp. Joseph got the role and became "Mickey" for 78 of the comedies, running from 1927 to 1936, starting with Mickey's Circus, released September 4, 1927. During an interruption in the series in 1932, Mrs. Yule made plans to take her son on a ten week vaudeville tour as "Mickey McGuire", but Fox sued successfully to stop him from using the name. Mrs. Yule suggested the stage name of "Mickey Looney" for her comedian son, which he altered slightly to a less frivolous version. Rooney did other films, including a few more of the McGuire films in his adolescence, and signed with MGM in 1934, where they cast him as the teenage son of a judge in 1937's "A Family Affair", setting Rooney on the way to another successful film series, and the rest is show business history.
Tags: joseph  yule  mickey  rooney  mcquire  silent  films 
Added: 28th December 2007
Views: 1668
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Posted By: Guido
Michael Flatley on Dancing Irish step-dancing sensation Michael Flatley choreographs and performs this routine specially for the US version of "Dancing with the Stars", performed during Season 5 Week 9 Results show, Nov-20-2007
Tags: michael  flatley  dancing  with  the  stars  irish   
Added: 29th January 2008
Views: 1279
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Posted By: geminat

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