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Rosie the Riveter Here are some great photos from the Library of Congress. I first heard about this when I was a kid, from my mom, who worked as a riveter for an aircraft plant during WWII. Rosie was an actual person, a riveter from Kentucky who represented the six million women who worked in the manufacturing plants that produced munitions and material during World War II. These women took the places of the male workers who were absent fighting in the Pacific and European theaters. The character is now considered a feminist icon in the US, and a herald of women's economic power to come. Rosie and her slogan were featured on posters, magazines, and more. These hard working women were paid a whopping $31.21 a week compared to men who brought home $54.65. Now....over 60 years later we're still fighting for equal pay!
Tags: rosie  the  riveter 
Added: 22nd January 2008
Views: 2087
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Kilroy Was Here During the Second World War, the odd phrase "Kilroy Was Here" began appearing on American military ships. Alongside the phrase was often a cartoon figure of a man with a huge nose peering over a wall. It was not until the war ended that the origin of the quirky character was known. James Kilroy was an inspector at a shipbuilding company in Halifax, MA. His job was to count the rivets used in each piece of work and make a checkmark with a wax pencil near the finished rivets. The riveters were paid for each rivet, so often unscrupulous ones would erase Kilroy's checkmarks in the hope that their work would be counted twice. To thwart this type of underhandedness, Kilroy began using the cartoon figure with the three-word phrase instead of a checkmark. No riveter ever tried to remove the artwork. Kilroy was supposed to remove it before the ships left the shipyard, but often he did not get the chance to do so. Thus, ships bearing the strange phrase and artwork headed into service. "Kilroy Was Here" became a catchphrase that was universally adopted throughout every American theater of war. It became fashionable to write it in strange places as an indication that the US military was omnipresent. It was often left behind by espionage agents and advance parties prior to mass invasions. According to one story, it was written inside the latrine used by Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill during the historic Yalta Conference in 1945. The phrase has endured for more than 70 years. It was written on the wall of the compound where Osama Bin Laden was hiding out.
Tags: Kilroy  Was  Here  WWII 
Added: 7th December 2014
Views: 1534
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Model for Rosie The Riveter Passes Mary Doyle Keefe, the model for Norman Rockwell's iconic 1943 Rosie the Riveter painting that symbolized the millions of American women who went to work on the home front during World War II, has died. She was 92.
Tags: Model  for  Rosie  The  Riveter  Passes  Mary  Doyle  Keefe  Norman  Rockwell  1943  iconic  American  woman  World  War  II  WWII  WW2 
Added: 23rd April 2015
Views: 461
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Posted By: Freckles

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