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             Peter Paul and Mary Peter, Paul and Mary were one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. The trio comprises Peter Yarrow, Noel "Paul" Stookey and Mary Travers. They recorded their first album, Peter, Paul and Mary, the following year. It included "500 Miles", "Lemon Tree" and the Pete Seeger hit tunes "If I Had a Hammer" and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?". The album was listed on the Billboard Magazine Top Ten list for ten months and in the Top One Hundred for over three years. By 1963 they had recorded three albums. All three were in the Top 10 the week of President Kennedy's assassination. That year the group also released "Puff the Magic Dragon", which Yarrow and Leonard Lipton had written in 1959, and performed "If I Had a Hammer" at the 1963 March on Washington, best remembered for Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Their biggest hit single was the Bob Dylan song "Blowin' in the Wind," an international #1 and the fastest selling single ever cut by Warner Bros. Records. They also sang other Bob Dylan songs, such as "The Times They Are a-Changin'" or "When the Ship Comes In". For many years after, the group was at the forefront of the civil rights movement and other causes promoting social justice. "Leaving On A Jet Plane," which in December 1969 became their only #1 hit, was written by John Denver, and first appeared on their Album 1700 in 1967. "Day Is Done," a #21 hit in June 1969, was the last Hot 100 hit the trio recorded.
Tags: peter  paul  and  mary  60 
Added: 22nd October 2007
Views: 2879
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Posted By: Sophia
LifeBouy5 Ad Pretty Funny
Tags: Teresas  got  it  right  There  are  some  good  oldies  out  there 
Added: 1st November 2007
Views: 1413
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Posted By: Marty6697
 Ferry Cross the Mersey Gerry and The Pacemakers were one of the few groups in the 60's to initially challenge The Beatles in popularity. Like The Beatles, they came from Liverpool and were also managed by Brian Epstein. Despite their early success, the group never had another number one single in the UK. Gerry Marsden began writing most of their own songs, including "It's Gonna Be All Right", "I'm the One", and "Ferry Cross the Mersey", as well as their first and biggest U.S. hit, "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying". All of these represented the band's light, poppy, enjoyable sound. By late 1965, their popularity was rapidly declining on both sides of the Atlantic. They lacked both the innovations of the Beatles and the rawer musical and visual edge of some of the other British Invasion groups, and they soon seemed un-hip. They disbanded in October 1966, with much of their latter recorded material never released in the UK. Drummer Freddie Marsden died on December 9, 2006, at age 66.
Tags: gerry  and  the  pacemakers  ferry  cross  the  mersey  60 
Added: 4th November 2007
Views: 2744
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Posted By: Naomi
Marisa Mell i remember seeing her in the saucy Italian comedy, ANYONE CAN PLAY . . here she is to the right with Claudine Auger . . but all i can really focus on are those hose!!
Tags: film  Marisa  Mell  Anyone  Can  Play  Claudine  Auger 
Added: 8th November 2007
Views: 1737
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Posted By: Teresa
CBS Cartoon Theatre he's right! those phones CAN be pesky!!
Tags: Dick  Van  Dyke  CBS  Cartoon  Theatre 
Added: 10th November 2007
Views: 1936
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Posted By: Teresa
Identify This Slugger He was the lone bright spot on some pretty dismal Pittsburgh Pirate teams of the early 1950s. Can you name him?
Tags: baseball  who  is  he 
Added: 21st January 2009
Views: 1172
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Posted By: Lava1964
Scopes Trial 1925 One of the most famous trials in American history was the 1925 Scopes trial in Dayton, Tennessee. John T. Scopes, a young science teacher, was charged with violating the Butler Act, a state law that, in a roundabout way, prohibited the teaching of evolution in public schools. Scopes was quickly relegated to a minor character in the trial as the two lawyers took center stage. Civil libertarian groups hired famed defense lawyer Clarence Darrow (on the left) to represent Scopes. The prosecution obtained the services of former presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan (right), a renowned creationist and famous orator. The highlight of the trial occurred when Darrow called Bryan to testify as an expert on the Bible. (The jury was out of the courtroom when Darrow cross-examined Bryan, and the entire exchange was expunged from the court record as the judge ruled it was irrelevant to whether or not Scopes had broken the law.) Scopes was eventually found guilty and fined $100. The conviction was later overturned on a technicality: the jury was supposed to establish the fine, not the judge. Actually, the trial should not have even occurred. Scopes was not at school on the day cited in the charge. The Butler Act remained on the books in Tennessee until 1976. The trial inspired the 1960 movie Inherit The Wind.
Tags: Scopes  trial  Bryan  Darrow 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2054
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Posted By: Lava1964
Alfred Mosher Butts Inventor of Scrabble One of my heroes! In 1948 Alfred Mosher Butts, an unemployed architect, invented the greatest word game in the history of the world: Scrabble Brand Crossword Game. He named it Criss-Cross Words and didn't make much money from it. He sold the rights to a family called the Brunots who renamed the game Scrabble and marketed it from their home. It got plenty of rave reviews in the early 1950s. Demand for Scrabble became so great that the Brunots could not keep pace with the orders. They in turn sold the rights to Scrabble to a manufacturer. Over the years Scrabble's ownership has passed through several companies. Hasbro presently owns the North American trademark name of Scrabble. Each year millions of games are sold and hundreds of tournaments are held under the aegis of the National Scrabble Association. (Yours truly is an expert ranked player who directs an official NSA club in Canada. I can often be spotted officiating major Scrabble events. Look for me at the 2008 U.S. Nationals in Orlando in July!)
Tags: Scrabble  Alfred  Butts 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2460
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Posted By: Lava1964
Beaver Lamb and Wombat coats The animal rights crowd won't like this 1929 ad. A wombat coat? Sounds weird, but what a deal! You save $14.
Tags: wombat  lamb  beaver  coats 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 3301
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Posted By: Lava1964
Quiz Show Scandal One of the most disillusioning moments in American TV history was the revelation that some of the big-money quiz shows of the 1950s were rigged. The most famous incident occurred on Twenty-One when longtime champion Herbert Stempel was dethroned by Charles Van Doren. Stempel was groomed by producer Dan Enright to look and behave like a know-it-all nerd--which had its desired effect. The public rooted for the handsome and sophisticated challenger, Charles Van Doren, to defeat him. Both players were coached on the questions they would receive. After a series of tie games, Stempel deliberately missed a relatively easy question that would have given him the win. The game ended in another tie and Van Doren won the next game. For 'taking a dive,' Stempel had been promised his own panel show by Enright. When Enright reneged, Stempel told the press that Twenty-One was rigged. At first his claims were thought to be those of a sore loser, but when contestants on another game show, Dotto, came forward with solid evidence of fixes, Stempel's accusations had to be investigated. The 1994 movie Quiz Show was based on this scandal.
Tags: Quiz  Show  Stempel  Van  Doren  Enright 
Added: 20th November 2007
Views: 2422
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Posted By: Lava1964

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