Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Australian PM Vanishes - 1967 Harold Holt, the 58-year-old prime minister of Australia, who had been in office only 22 months, vanished while swimmiming in the ocean late in 1967. On the morning of Sunday, December 17, Holt together with friends Christopher Anderson, Jan Lee and George Illson and his two bodyguards, drove down from Melbourne to see the British yachtsman Alec Rose sail through Port Phillip Heads in his boat Lively Lady to complete a leg of his solo circumnavigation of the globe, which started and ended in England. Around noon, the party drove to one of Holt's favorite swimming and snorkelling spots, Cheviot Beach on Point Nepean near Portsea, on the eastern arm of Port Phillip Bay. Holt decided to go swimming, although the surf was heavy and Cheviot Beach was notorious for its strong currents and dangerous rip tides. Ignoring his friends' pleas not to go in, Holt began swimming, but soon disappeared from view. Fearing the worst, his friends raised the alarm. Within a short time, the beach and the water off shore were being searched by a large contingent of police, Royal Australian Navy divers, Royal Australian Air Force helicopters, Army personnel from nearby Point Nepean and local volunteers. This quickly escalated into one of the largest search operations in Australian history, but no trace of Holt was ever found. Two days later, the government made an official announcement that Holt was presumed dead. Deputy Prime Minister John McEwen was sworn in as caretaker Prime Minister until such time as the governing Liberal party could elect a new leader. There were many rumors surrounding Holt's strange death, including claims that he had committed suicide or faked his own death in order to run away with his mistress. The mystery became the subject of numerous urban myths in Australia, including persistent claims that he was kidnapped (or rescued) by a Chinese submarine, or the far-fetched claim that he had been abducted by a UFO.
Tags: Australia  Harold  Holt  PM  vanishes 
Added: 6th February 2014
Views: 1138
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
George O Leary Resume Scandal In December 2001, the University of Notre Dame hired George O'Leary to be its new head football coach. Five days later O'Leary was fired because of falsehoods on his resume. Portions of O'Leary's resume, which had been made public by the university, claimed that O'Leary had earned a master's degree in education from NYU-Stony Brook University and three football letters from the University of New Hampshire. None of it was true. O'Leary had obtained only two credits from NYU and never graduated. Moreover, NYU-Stony Brook University does not exist. Also, records proved he had never played football at New Hampshire. The inaccuracies came to light when a newspaper reporter from New Hampshire wanted to write a favorable local-angle story about Notre Dame's new coach--and discovered that no one on the New Hampshire football team remembered O'Leary. O'Leary had successfully coached Georgia Tech to a national championship in 1991 and no one had thought to question his resume then.
Tags: George  O  Leary  Notre  Dame  resume  fraud 
Added: 3rd September 2009
Views: 12021
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Donald Haines - Our Gang War Casualty Donald Haines was a supporting character in the Our Gang comedies just after the transition from silent movies to sound. Haines's tenure began during the early talkies up through the "Miss Crabtree episodes," when he would leave for feature films at Paramount only to return a few months later. His tenure continued through 1933. Haines's first short was Shivering Shakespeare, which featured the youngster giggling his way through his lines. On the next short The First Seven Years, he was a main character, playing opposite Jackie Cooper. After that, he was a recurring character with a few small speaking roles until 1931. At that time he was offered a contract with Paramount, which would begin with a role in a feature called Skippy. Jackie Cooper also was offered a role on that feature and a contract. Cooper would remain at Paramount. Haines, on the other hand, would quickly leave Paramount to return to Hal Roach Studios just in time for the 1931-1932 season. At that point, several major characters had left the series because they were perceived as too old. This left a depleted Our Gang of only three regulars and a few recurring characters. Haines would resume his role as a recurring character with an occasional speaking role for the next two seasons. Shortly after Pearl Harbor was attacked in 1941, Haines joined the Army Air Force and rose to the rank of lieutenant. He was listed as missing in action in February 1943. His body was never found.
Tags: Donald  Haines  Our  Gang  MIA 
Added: 10th September 2011
Views: 1786
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The 33-Inning Baseball Game - 1981 The longest game in pro baseball history occurred at McCoy Stadium in 1981 between the home Pawtucket (RI) Red Sox and visiting Rochester (NY) Red Wings of the AAA International League. It lasted a mind-boggling 33 innings. The game began on Saturday, April 18 and lasted 32 innings before being stopped. Play resumed on June 23. Only one additional inning was required as Pawtucket won 3-2 in the bottom of the 33rd inning. The game included future Hall-of-Famers Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken Jr. and 23 others who would eventually advance to MLB. Ominously the start of the game was delayed 30 minutes while a bank of lights was repaired. The game was tied 1-1 after nine innings. It remained knotted for the next 11 innings due to strong performances by both bullpens. In the top of the 21st inning, Red Wings' catcher Dave Huppert doubled, driving in a run giving Rochester a 2-1 lead. In the bottom of the inning, Pawtucket's Wade Boggs hit a double to score Dave Koza and tie the game 2-2. According to league rules, a curfew was supposed to take effect at 1 AM. However, plate umpire Dennis Cregg had an out-of-date rule book; it was missing that provision. Thus the game continued for 11 more scoreless innings. At 2 AM Pawtucket reliever Luis Aponte, who had pitched the seventh through tenth innings, received permission to go home. When Aponte got home at 3 AM, his wife Xiomara angrily asked, "Where have you been?" The pitcher responded, "At the ballpark." His wife snapped, "Like hell you have!" Because news of the game didn't appear in most newspapers until Monday, Aponte spent two nights on the couch. At the start of the 30th inning, the game became the longest in professional history, surpassing a 29-inning game in the Florida State League on June 14, 1966. As the game dragged on, food supplies ran out in the clubhouse and players took drastic measures to keep warm in the April chill. This included burning the benches in the bullpens and the broken bats in the dugouts. Meanwhile, Pawtucket general manager Mike Tamburro was attempting to reach IL president Harold Cooper so he could intervene. Cooper was eventually reached. Horrified, he ordered the game suspended after the completion of the current inning. At 4:09 AM, at the end of the 32nd inning, the game was stopped and would be resumed at a later date. At this point, there were just 19 fans left in the ballpark from the original 1,740. (One was the nephew of umpire Cregg. He had fallen asleep.) Each was given a lifetime pass to McCoy Stadium by Pawtucket owner Ben Mondor. As the players left the stadium they encountered people on their way to sunrise church services for Easter Sunday. Play resumed on June 23 when the Red Wings next returned to Pawtucket. On hand for the resumption was a sellout crowd of 5,746 fans, four television networks, and 140 members of the press from around the world. The game required just one inning and 18 minutes to finish. Pawtucket's first three batters singled. Dave Koza's drove home Marty Barrett. This photo shows on-deck hitter Wade Boggs congratulating Barrett as he touches the plate. The game had lasted a combined 8 hours and 25 minutes. A total of 882 pitches had been thrown.
Tags: minor  league  baseball  marathon  33  innings 
Added: 12th September 2011
Views: 2160
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 4070
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Marion Lorne - Aunt Clara Even though Marion Lorne had five decades of stage work on her resume, she didn't become widely famous as an actress until the last few years of her life. Her occasional role as the befuddled, forgetful, and utterly lovable Aunt Clara on the sitcom Bewitched made her a TV favorite. In her episodes on the show, Clara (who was one of Samantha Stevens' relatives, and thus a witch) would unintentionally cause chaos in the Stevens household with her inability to control her spell-casting powers. Lorne was awarded a well deserved Emmy for her role in 1968. Sadly, the award came posthumusly; she had died of a heart attack at age 82 a few weeks earlier. Elizabeth Montgomery accepted the Emmy on Lorne's behalf.
Tags: Bewitched  Marion  Lorne 
Added: 27th April 2012
Views: 2442
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Isner-Mahut Wimbledon Marathon A first-round men's singles match at the 2010 Wimbledon tourney between American John Isner and Frenchman Nicolas Mahut was, in many respects, the greatest tennis match ever contested. It is the longest match in tennis history, measured both by time and number of games. The extraordinary match, contested over three days, lasted 11 hours and 5 minutes with Isner eventually prevailing 64, 36, 67(79), 76(73), 7068 for a total of 183 games. The match began at 6:13 pm on Tuesday, June 22. At 9:07 pm, due to fading light, play was suspended at two sets all. After resuming on Wednesday, at 2:05 pm, the record for longest match was broken at 5:45 pm. The light faded again, and so play was suspended at 9:10 pm, with the final set tied at 59 games all. Play resumed at 3:43 pm on Thursday. Isner won at 4:48 pm, the final set having lasted 8 hours, 11 minutes. Both players broke numerous Wimbledon and tennis records, including each serving over 100 aces, with the match being referred to as "the endless match." Twice the score of the final set exceeded the scoreboard's ability to record it. (A computer technician was called in to address the problem both times.) Of course such a lengthy match is only possible at events such as Wimbledon where no tiebreaker is played in the final set.
Tags: tennis  Isner  Mahut  Wimbledon 
Added: 31st August 2013
Views: 865
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ben Hogan - 1949 Car Crash Ben Hogan had been on the PGA tour since 1938 and was an established star when his life nearly came to a premature end in 1949. Hogan and his wife, Valerie, survived a head-on collision with a Greyhound bus on a fog-shrouded bridge, early in the morning, east of Van Horn, Texas on February 2, 1949. Hogan threw himself across Valerie in order to protect her, and would have been killed had he not done so, as the steering column punctured the driver's seat. This accident left Hogan, age 36, with a double-fracture of the pelvis, a fractured collar bone, a left ankle fracture, a chipped rib, and near-fatal blood clots: he would suffer lifelong circulation problems and other physical limitations. His doctors said he might never walk again, let alone play golf competitively. While in hospital, Hogan's life was endangered by a blood clot problem, leading doctors to tie off the vena cava. Hogan left the hospital on April 1, 59 days after the accident. After regaining his strength by extensive walking, he resumed golf activities in November 1949. He returned to the PGA Tour to start the 1950 season, at the Los Angeles Open, where he tied with Sam Snead over 72 holes, but lost the 18-hole playoff.
Tags: golf  Ben  Hogan  car  crash 
Added: 27th June 2013
Views: 2313
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
James Scott - Prisoner Boxer One of the most controversial professional athletes in history was James Scott--a light heavyweight boxer who was permitted to pursue a professional ring career from within the confines of a New Jersey state prison. By the time Scott was 28 years old he had spent about half his life in reformatories or prisons. After serving time in Rahway State Prison for robbery, Scott began boxing professionally in Miami under the tutelage of Angelo and Chris Dundee in the mid-1970s. He compiled a record of 11-0-1 before trouble found him again. A car he owned was linked to a robbery and murder. Scott maintained he had merely loaned the car to friends and was utterly unaware of their plans. Law enforcement didn't buy his story and Scott was returned to Rahway prison to serve a 30-year term for parole violation. While there Scott persuaded correctional officials that a prison boxing program would benefit everyone: Prisoners would be able to release their frustrations in an acceptable manner, they could pursue professional careers upon their releases, and the overall camaraderie among all prisoners would be improved. The state thought Scott's idea had merit. Remarkably, they also allowed Scott to resume his pro boxing career--as long as his opponents were willing to fight inside the prison. Scott--whose fitness regimen reputedly included 1,500 push-ups per day--became a force to be reckoned with. He earned a top-10 ranking from the World Boxing Association in an era when the light heavyweight division was very deep. NBC and CBS each aired Scott's bouts. ABC, however, kept its distance from Scott due to his criminal convictions. Scott's biggest win came over Eddie Gregory in 1977. Gregory was the number-one-ranked contender at the time and would eventually win the WBA championship. Whenever a Scott bout was shown on TV there were numerous complaints forwarded to the network from people who did not think an incarcerated person should be allowed to pursue a pro sports career in prison. The rival World Boxing Council agreed and never did rank Scott. Eventually the WBA dropped Scott from its rankings too, largely because he would most likely have to leave Rahway to fight for a championship. With no hope of ever fighting for a title, Scott's career waned. Scott lost two of his last three fights to end his career with a record of 19-2-1. Scott's final bout, a 1981 defeat, came at the hands of Dwight Braxton who would later win world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. Ironically, Braxton had been a former Rahway inmate himself. Scott was finally released from prison in 2005 when he was in his mid-sixties.
Tags: boxing  James  Scott  prisoner 
Added: 6th July 2015
Views: 1004
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Incomplete 1919 Stanley Cup Final The NHL has not always had sole possession of the Stanley Cup as its championship trophy. It was originally donated by Lord Stanley of Preston, Canada's fifth governor-general, to be awarded to the championship amateur hockey team of Canada. By 1910, the rules were liberalized and professional teams were competing for it. Beginning in the 1910s, the professional champions of the west annually met the champions of the eastern-based National Hockey Association (and later the National Hockey League) for the Cup with the venue alternating between east and west each year. In 1919, the Seattle Metropolitan were pitted against the Montreal Canadiens in a best-of-five contest in Seattle. After five games, the series was tied with each team having won twice and one game ending in a tie. A sixth game was necessary to decide the Cup winner, but by the end of the fifth game, both teams were feeling the effects of illness as the Spanish Influenza pandemic hit Seattle. The Canadiens were especially hard hit by the flu bug. Several players were hospitalized. One, defenseman Joe Hall, died. The series was abandoned and never resumed. Thus there was no Stanley Cup winner in 1919.
Tags: hockey  Stanley  Cup  final  cancelled  1919  flu  epidemic 
Added: 11th November 2017
Views: 552
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] of 1 | Random