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The New Andy Griffith Show 1971 After eight successful seasons, The Andy Griffith Show went off the air in 1968 as television's number-one show. In September 1970, CBS created a new series for Griffith, a comedy-drama titled 'Headmaster,' in which Griffith played the headmaster of a co-ed California prep school. Viewers, accustomed to Griffith playing a southern sheriff, rejected the show. It was scrapped after just three months. Undeterred, CBS then cast Griffith in a more folksy-type role as a small-town North Carolina mayor in The New Andy Griffith Show. Even though it was written and created by Aaron Ruben (who had created the original Andy Griffith Show) it too never caught on with viewers. It was yanked after just 12 episodes in CBS' infamous 'rural purge' when all its non-urban sitcoms were axed. Here is the opening of Griffith's second failure of the 1970-71 season.
Tags: New  Andy  Griffith  Show 
Added: 19th March 2009
Views: 3477
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Denver Declines 1976 Winter Olympics Remember Denver hosting the 1976 Winter Olympics? No? That's because the Colorado capital was supposed to host the Games but didn't. In May 1970, the International Olympic Committee chose Denver to host '76 Winter Games ahead of bids from locales in Switzerland, Finland, and Canada. The USOC was ecstatic, but the taxpayers of Colorado were far less enthusiastic when they learned they would be footing much of the Games' costs. Within a very short time, an anti-Games movement grew in the state. During the 1972 election campaign, a plebiscite asked Coloradoans what they thought about a $5-million bond issue to finance the Games. On the same night Richard Nixon was re-elected, Colorado voters rejected the bond issue by a substantial 60/40 ratio. (In retrospect, that $5 million would have only covered a small fraction of the Games' actual costs.) A week after the voters spoke, Denver officially withdrew as the host city for 1976 Winter Olympics. The Games were hastily given to Innsbruck, Austria--where the 1964 Games had been held--because the facilities were already in place.
Tags: Olympics  Winter  Denver  declined 
Added: 16th September 2010
Views: 2741
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Marriage Proposal Rejected At Basketball Game I've been waiting for this to happen at one of these public marriage proposals: At a February 13, 2008 basketball game, a Houston Rockets fan asks his girlfriend to marry him--and she says no! (On the bright side, the Rockets did beat the Sacramento Kings 89-87 that night. I'm sure that cheered up the poor fellow!)
Tags: marriage  proposal  rejected  basketball 
Added: 16th August 2008
Views: 2689
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Marion Parker Murder - 1927 Fair warning: This story is unsettling. One of the most brutal crimes in American history was the kidnapping and murder of 12-year-old schoolgirl Marion Parker. On Thursday, December 15, 1927 a young man appeared at Mount Vernon Junior High School in Los Angeles claiming to be an associate of Perry Parker, a prominent local banker. The man coolly told the school's registrar that the banker had been seriously injured in a car accident and had requested to speak to his daughter. There were actually twin Parker sisters enrolled in the school--Marion and Marjorie. By chance the registrar fetched Marion who rode off with the man. He was later identified as 19-year-old William Edward Hickman. The Parker family became alarmed when Marion did not return from school. Shortly thereafter they received a ransom note and phone calls from the kidnapper asking for $1500 in gold certificates in exchange for Marion's safe return. One attempt by Marion's father to pay the ransom was thwarted when Hickman spotted police detectives lurking nearby. Another meeting time was secretly arranged by Hickman and Marion's father on December 17 where the money was given to a man in a parked car. Perry Parker saw his daughter wrapped in a blanket slumped in the back seat with her eyes open. At gunpoint the ransom was paid and the driver pushed the girl onto the street and drove away. Marion's father was horrified to find that his daughter was dead. Her eyelids had been sewn open to give the illusion that she was alive. Worse, her head had been severed, her arms and legs had been cut off and she had been disemboweled. (The missing limbs were found the next day in a city park.) The ghastly crime spawned the largest manhunt in southern California's history, one that included 20,000 volunteers. A reward of $100,000 was offered for the capture of the culprit. Several clues, including the discovery of the stolen car used on the night of the money exchange, led to Hickman being named as the key suspect. He was eventually arrested in Echo, OR after spending some of the gold certificates there. Hickman had been a former employee at Parker's bank and had been fired for embezzlement in a forged check scam. He served prison time for the crime. The fingerprint records from the embezzlement charge were used to match those found on the stolen car from the kidnapping. Hickman willingly told police in graphic detail that he had decided to kill Marion because she had discovered his name. She had only been dead about 12 hours before the money exchange. Hickman said he had choked her with a towel to make her unconscious and then began his dismemberment while she was still alive. Hickman--who said he intended to use the $1500 to pay his tuition to attend a bible college!--hoped to avoid the gallows by claiming insanity. He was one of the first defendants in California to try that ploy after it had become an acceptable legal defense. It failed when a fellow prisoner claimed Hickman had asked his advice on how to appear crazy. A jury rejected Hickman's insanity defense in February 1928. Hickman was executed at San Quentin Prison eight months later on October 19. His hand-written confession is on display at the Los Angeles Police Museum. Marion Parker's ghost is said to occupy her former house.
Tags: Marion  Parker  murder  kidnapping  1927 
Added: 13th April 2015
Views: 1660
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Edward R Murrow Edward R. Murrow was arguably the most important and influential journalist in American history. His first-person radio reports from hot-spot European locales in the late 1930s gave his CBS listeners a sense of how the world was moving towards war. Murrow is most renowned for his compelling radio broadcasts from London during the Blitz. They always began, 'This...is London.' Murrow's distinguished career continued into the television era with See It Now and various specials. He famously took on Senator Joseph McCarthy when a friend, Laurence Duggan, committed suicide after McCarthy accused him of being a communist spy. (An examination of decrypted Soviet archives years later proved McCarthy was correct!) One ominous episode of See It Now examined the dangers of cigarettes--while the chain-smoking Murrow puffed away on his indispensible Camels. Murrow said he couldn't possibly go more than 30 minutes without a cigarette. He died in 1965, two days after his 57th birthday, of lung cancer. He was featured on a 29-cent stamp in 1994. The original stamp design showed him with a cigarette in his hand. It was rejected.
Tags: Edward  R  Murrow  journalist 
Added: 30th October 2009
Views: 1898
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Posted By: Lava1964
Name This Ambulance Driver This famous American was rejected for service in the First World War because he was underage. Instead he joined the Red Cross and went to France as an ambulance driver. Can you name him?
Tags: name  this  ambluance  driver 
Added: 7th November 2009
Views: 1253
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Manchester United Plane Disaster - 1958 One of the great sports tragedies of the twentieth century was the Munich Air Disaster. It occurred on February 6, 1958, when British European Airways Flight 609 crashed on its third attempt to take off from a slush-covered runway at Munich-Riem Airport in Munich, West Germany. On board the plane was the glamorous Manchester United football team, nicknamed the "Busby Babes" (after manager Matt Busby), along with a few supporters and sports journalists. Twenty of the 44 people on board the aircraft died instantly in the crash. The injured, some of whom had been knocked unconscious, were taken to the Rechts der Isar Hospital in Munich where three more died, resulting in a total of 23 fatalities with 21 survivors. The team was returning from a European Cup match in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, against Red Star Belgrade, but had to make a stop in Munich to refuel the aircraft. After refuelling, the pilots, Captains James Thain and Kenneth Rayment, attempted to take off twice, but had to abandon both attempts due to boost surging in the port engine. Fearing that they would get too far behind schedule, Captain Thain rejected an overnight stay in Munich in favour of a third take-off attempt. By the time of the third attempt, it had begun to snow, causing a layer of slush to build up at the end of the runway. When the aircraft hit the slush, it lost velocity, making take-off impossible. It plowed through a fence past the end of the runway, before the port wing hit a nearby house and was torn off. Fearing that the aircraft might explode, Captain Thain set about getting the surviving passengers as far away as possible. Despite this threat, Manchester United goalkeeper Harry Gregg remained behind to pull survivors from the wreckage. An investigation by West German airport authorities originally blamed Captain Thain for the crash, claiming that he had failed to deice the wings of the aircraft, despite statements to the contrary from eyewitnesses. It was later established that the crash had, in fact, been caused by the build-up of slush on the runway, which had resulted in the aircraft being unable to achieve take-off velocity. Accordingly Thain's name was eventually cleared in 1968--a decade after the incident. At the time of the disaster, Manchester United were trying to become only the third club to win three successive English league titles; they were six points behind League leaders Wolverhampton Wanderers with 14 games to go. They were also holders of the Charity Shield and had just advanced into their second successive European Cup semi-final. The team was also on an 11-match unbeaten run, and had advanced to the Fifth Round of the FA Cup tournament two weeks before the crash. Real Madrid won the European Cup in 1958, but team officials generously offered to have Manchester United declared the winners. This plan was not approved by UEFA, however. Manchester United did win the European Cup ten years later. Two of the survivors from 1958 were on that 1968 team.
Tags: soccer  Manchester  United  disaster  airplane 
Added: 7th June 2012
Views: 4402
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 1957
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Harold Lloyd Bomb Mishap - 1919 On August 24, 1919, ascending silent movie comedian Harold Lloyd arrived at Pathe Studios to begin a publicity campaign to celebrate his new contract. He was posing for some publicity stills--unaware that such a seemingly benign activity was about to dramatically change his life. In one posed shot Lloyd was supposed to light a prop bomb with a cigarette dangling from his mouth. (The image supposedly played up Lloyd's typical devil-may-care attitude in his films.) Unbeknownst to anyone in the studio, some actual bombs from another film--which had been rejected for being too dangerous--had been placed in a box among some dummy bombs. The photographer innocently handed Lloyd one of the live bombs. When the fuse was lit, Lloyd sensed something was mildly wrong because it produced excessive smoke that would surely ruin any photographs. Just as Lloyd discarded the bomb on a nearby table, it exploded. Miraculously Lloyd was not killed as the blast ripped open a a 16-foot swath in the room. Nevertheless, Lloyd suffered numerous facial injuries and temporarily lost his eyesight. Only when extreme pain set in did Lloyd become aware that his right thumb and forefinger had been severed. He spent six weeks in a hospital recovering. He was overwhelmed by the number of fan letters which he said helped him overcome his depression about the accident. In all his subsequent films Lloyd wore a special prosthetic device concealed within a white glove to make it look like his right hand was absolutely normal. Lloyd did not want to dwell on his injury as he did not want moviegoers to watch his films due to pity. Lloyd continued to engage in very active physical comedy routines despite the handicap. His famous building-climbing scene in Safety Last occurred after the bomb accident--making it all the more incredible. Some years ago I posted Lloyd's 1953 mystery guest appearance on What's My Line. His deformed hand can clearly be seen when he shakes hands with the WML panelists as he departs.
Tags: Harold  Lloyd  bomb  injury  hand 
Added: 20th April 2015
Views: 3727
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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