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Father Mulcahy MASH Interview Some of the most innovative episodes of MASH were those that featured the characters being interviewed by a newsreel crew. One of the most memorable sequences was when Father Mulcahy was asked if he had been changed by his wartime experiences.
Tags: MASH  interview  Father  Mulcahy 
Added: 29th March 2009
Views: 5493
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mr. Machine by Ideal Toy Corporation 1962 An Ideal Classic that was so popular that Ideal adopted Mr. Machine as their official logo! This toy was designed by Marvin Glass a freelance toy designer and he fashioned Mr. Machine after a henpecked husband. He squawks as he walks. You could take Mr. Machine apart and even though they say it was desinged for a 5 year to do, many a Mr. Machine laid in pieces only to be tossed out by parents who couldn't figure out how to put him back together either. I repair and take apart old toys to clean them and I had one heck of a some fun putting him back together-NOT! LOL. There were two variations of Mr. Machine that came out in the 70s and one in the 80s, but nothing compares to the original Mr. Machine!!!! His orginal box is shown too!
Tags: Ideal  Toys  Old  60s  Classic 
Added: 14th August 2007
Views: 3572
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Posted By: dezurtdude
Sony TC-755 Reel to Reel Tape Deck A wonderful mmachine that was one of the first to introduce electronic switching to replace the older, manually operated levers. Still working great!
Tags: Reel  Sony  Electronics  Stereophile  Stereo 
Added: 16th August 2007
Views: 4061
Rating:
Posted By: jimmyjet
Career Academy Reel to Reel Tape Machine This is a small, portable reel to reel tape recorder that was made in Japan for the "Career Academy School of Famous Broadcasters." I attended that Academy in Milwaukee, Wisconsin back in 1969. These tape recorders were offered to students so that we had something on which to practice our "announcer voice" while we were not in class. It could handle 5" or smaller reels. It still works. At the time I attended the school two rather famous people were sponsors of it. Broadcaster, author and lecturer Robert St. John, and NBA star Kareem Abdul Jabbar, (of course, back then in 1969 he was known as Lew Alcindor, and played for the Milwaukee Bucks.) I got to meet both of these gentlemen. Mr. St. John was actually the author of the textbook we used. I became a radio broadcaster… but never a famous one. :-( This was back in the days when you could lose your broadcasting license and even your job for saying ‘hell’ or ‘damn’ over the air. Somewhere along the way the FCC has curled up and died!
Tags: reel  tape  career  academy  radio 
Added: 22nd August 2007
Views: 3979
Rating:
Posted By: jimmyjet
J C Penney Reel to Reel This is a J.C. Penney model 6217 reel to reel tape recorder from the early '70s. All it says on the back is "made in Japan," possibly by Sony, I'm not sure. This was the first reel to reel that I ever owned... if you don't count a cassette player as a reel to reel machine. It had two speakers but was not a stereo. It played monaural out of both speakers which were built into the sides of the machine. A nice little reel to reel machine for a young man like me who didn't have a lot of $$$. Lightweight, with a protective cover, it got the job done rather nicely. I worked as a radio announcer when I owned his and it was super easy to record all my own music onto reels using the station’s equipment. Quite a fringe benefit!
Tags: reel  tape  recorder  jc  penny 
Added: 23rd August 2007
Views: 2526
Rating:
Posted By: jimmyjet
Sony TC 630 Tape Recorder This is a Sony TC-630 reel to reel tape player. I had one of them back in the mid '70s. I bought it so that I could record a two man group that my buddy and I had. He played a 12 string guitar and I played a harmonica and the drums, (not at the same time... I wasn't that coordinated.) For those of you who might have had one of these wonderful machines you'll remember that it had what Sony called "Sound on Sound" capabilities. Simply put, that meant that after you had made a recording you could go back to whatever point you wanted to and record something else on top of what you had just recorded, without erasing your original recording. What I would do is record my friend and I playing a song, with me on my harmonica, usually playing something by John Denver. When we were through I would go back to the beginning of the song and using headphones, listen to what we had just recorded while playing my drums using the Sound on Sound function. When we would play back the recording it would play everything just as if we had three members in the group! What a great machine this was! It weighed about a zillion pounds, though.
Tags: sony  reel  tape  recorder 
Added: 23rd August 2007
Views: 6830
Rating:
Posted By: jimmyjet
1929 Wightman Cup Tennis Here's some great old silent newsreel footage of the 1929 Wightman Cup tennis matches at Forest Hills between the best American and British female players. The focus is on Helen Wills, one of the greatest tennis champions ever.
Tags: tennis  Wightman  Cup 
Added: 19th March 2009
Views: 1144
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2045
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 295
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Posted By: Lava1964
There Is A Santa  Bewitched this is one of my all-time favorite episodes . . i would play it all if it could!! I remember recording it another year on a olive green reel-to reel tape recorder that my parents had gotten me for Christmas! do u recognize Billy Mummy from LOST IN SPACE?
Tags: sitcom  Bewitched  Darrin  Dick  York  Sam  Elizabeth  Montgomery 
Added: 27th November 2007
Views: 2099
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Posted By: Teresa

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