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Springhill Mining Disaster 1958 One of the first major 'ongoing' news stories to be covered live on television was the coal mining disaster in Springhill, Nova Scotia, Canada on October 23, 1958. That night 174 miners were trapped 13,000 feet below ground when a 'bump' caused a huge section of the mine to collapse. It was the third major disaster at the mine since 1891. Exactly 100 miners were rescued; some were trapped for five days before being saved. The bodies of the other 74 were all eventually recovered. Because of the heat at that depth, many of the corpses had badly decomposed by the time they were found. The mine never reopened.
Tags: Springhill  mine  disaster 
Added: 13th June 2009
Views: 2716
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Posted By: Lava1964
Edmund Fitzgerald God Bless the 29 sailors who perished that cold stormy November day May they rest in peace There bodies were never recovered
Tags: Let  them  rest  in  peace 
Added: 6th October 2007
Views: 1855
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Posted By: Marty6697
Montreal Expos Tribute For 36 seasons, the Montreal Expos were Canada's National League team. Over those years they fluctuated from near-greatness to ineptitude. They had the best record in major league baseball when the 1994 labor stoppage cancelled the season. The team never recovered its fan support after that. Kind of sad to see a team that was once so strongly supported go down the tubes. Here's a tribute to the guys who wore those odd uniforms.
Tags: Montreal  Expos 
Added: 11th March 2008
Views: 1257
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Posted By: Lava1964
1915 Scottish Railroad Disaster The worst railroad disaster in history occurred on May 22, 1915 near Gretna Green, Dumfriesshire, Scotland. It is commonly known as the Quintinshill Disaster, having been named for the location of a nearby intermediate signal box with passing loops on each side on the Caledonian Railway Main Line linking Glasgow and Carlisle. The crash, which involved five trains, killed a probable 226 people and injured 246 others. Those killed were mainly territorial soldiers from the Royal Scots heading for the Gallipoli front in the First World War. The precise number of dead was never established with certainty as the roll list of the regiment was destroyed by the fire. The crash occurred when a troop train travelling from Larbert, Stirlingshire to Liverpool, Lancashire collided with a local passenger train that had been shunted on to the main line, to then be hit by an express train to Glasgow which crashed into the wreckage a minute later. Gas from the lighting system of the old wooden carriages of the troop train ignited, starting a fire which soon engulfed the three passenger trains and also two goods trains standing on nearby passing loops. A number of bodies were never recovered, having been wholly consumed by the fire. The bodies that were recovered were buried together in a mass grave in Edinburgh's Rosebank Cemetery. Such was the scope of the disaster that many of the rescuers wrongly assumed the trains had been targets of German saboteurs. Four bodies, believed to be of children, were never identified or claimed and are buried in the Western Necropolis, Glasgow. The cause of the accident was poor working practices on the part of the two signalmen involved. It was discovered that the two men often colluded to falsify their records of when they relieved each other, routinely did not follow regulations properly, and engaged in other unsafe practices. The results of the official inquiry into the disaster led to their imprisonment for culpable homicide after legal proceedings in both Scotland and England. A memorial to the dead soldiers was erected soon after the accident. There are a number of more recent memorials at various locations. An annual remembrance service is held at Rosebank Cemetery.
Tags: Scotland  1915  train  disaster 
Added: 13th December 2014
Views: 663
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ben Johnson Steroid Scandal Can it be 20 years ago that this major sports scandal broke? Canada's Ben Johnson won the men's 100-metre sprint at the 1988 Seoul Olympics in a world-record time of 9.79 seconds. He didn't keep his gold medal very long. Two days later he tested positive for stanozolol--a banned steroid and was stripped of his gold medal. Track and field has never recovered from the scandal. Numerous other drug cheats have been busted since that infamous day in 1988. Whenever a world record is now broken, people tend to view it with great suspicion.
Tags: Ben  Johnson  steroids  Olympics 
Added: 10th July 2008
Views: 848
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Crucified Soldier One enduring controversy about the First World War is a grisly tale of a Canadian soldier who was allegedly found crucified to a wall of a barn in Belgium. The unsettling incident is said to have happened following the terrible Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915 where the Germans first used poison gas. Rumors abounded that the enraged Canadians were not too interested in capturing German prisoners. According to the story, the Germans retaliated by crucifying a random Canadian prisoner. According to reports form three Canadian soldiers, they witnessed a comrade, Sgt. Harry Band, impaled on a wall by five German bayonets. The tale, which spread quickly around the world through newspaper stories, was dismissed by many people as wartime propaganda. Depicting this event is this 32-inch bronze scultpure titled Canada's Golgotha. It was removed from a post-war art exhibit after formal complaints by the Germans who insisted the story was bogus. As late as 1989 the sculpture was hidden from public view. In 2002, a war researcher uncovered letters from supposed witnesses to the event that were written to Band's sister. These letters attest that the awful story was true. Band's body was never recovered. He is still listed among the missing in action.
Tags: First  World  War  crucified  soldier 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 2280
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ray Combs The original ABC version of Family Feud was hosted by Richard Dawson from 1976 through 1985. Three years later the game show returned to the air on CBS (and then syndication) with Ray Combs as its host. Combs was originally a comedian who was successful as a warm-up act for studio audiences at TV tapings. His favorable reputation once got him a stand-up gig on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. When Family Feud was resurrected, Combs was inevitably compared to Richard Dawson--usually unfavorably. When Mark Goodson, Family Feud's creator, died in 1993, his son took control of the show. With ratings noticeably falling, it was announced that Combs would be replaced by old favorite Richard Dawson in 1994. At the end of the final Family Feud that Combs hosted, he left the stage immediately after he said goodbye--instead of mingling with the competing families, as was the custom. Combs never recovered from losing the show. A car accident caused a spinal injury that put him in constant pain. The comedy clubs he owned closed; he suffered major financial losses and lost his home. His wife of 18 years left him. Displying suicidal tendencies, Combs was hospitalized shortly after his 40th birthday. Not long after his release, police were called to Combs' home which he was violently trashing. He was taken to a mental institution. A short time later Combs committed suicide by hanging himself with his bed linen. In a weird coincidence, Richard Dawson died 16 years to the day that Ray Combs did.
Tags: Ray  Combs  suicide  game  show  host 
Added: 24th July 2010
Views: 5498
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Liz and Debbie Gossip Magazine In the late 1950s, the premier showbiz scandal focused on singer Eddie Fisher dumping wife Debbie Reynolds for Elizabeth Taylor. Fans could not get enough news--real or otherwise--about the messy love triangle, as this period gossip magazine cover indicates. Fisher, who had been a leading pre-rock-and-roll teen idol, was perceived as a villain. His career went into an immediate tailspin and never recovered.
Tags: Eddie  Fisher  Liz  Talyor  Debbie  Reynolds 
Added: 28th September 2010
Views: 1264
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Posted By: Lava1964
1916 New Jersey Shark Attacks During an 11-day period during a 1916 heatwave, five people were attacked by sharks along the coast of New Jersey. Only one victim survived. These well chronicled events inspired Peter Benchley's famous novel Jaws. The first attack occurred on Saturday, July 1 at Beach Haven, a resort town off New Jersey's southern coast. Charles Epting Vansant, 25, of Philadelphia was vacationing at the Engleside Hotel. Before dinner, Vansant decided to take a quick swim in the Atlantic. Shortly after entering the water, Vansant began shouting. He was rescued by lifeguard Alexander Ott who pulled the bleeding Vansant from the water. Vansant's left thigh had been stripped of its flesh. He bled to death on the hotel manager's desk. The second attack occurred 45 miles north of Beach Haven at the resort town of Spring Lake, New Jersey. The victim was Charles Bruder, 27, a hotel bellhop. Bruder was killed on Thursday, July 6, 1916, while swimming 130 yards from shore. A shark bit him in the abdomen and severed his legs. Lifeguards Chris Anderson and George White pulled Bruder into their canoe but he bled to death before they reached the shore. The next two attacks occurred on Wednesday, July 12. They shockingly took place in fresh water in Matawan Creek near the town of Matawan, 30 miles north of Spring Lake and 16 miles inland! Around 2 p.m. some local boys, including Lester Stillwell, 11, were playing in the creek at an area called the Wyckoff Dock. A dorsal fin appeared and the boys realized it was a shark. Before Stillwell could leave the creek, the shark pulled him underwater. Stillwell's friends ran to town for help. Several men, including local businessman Watson Stanley Fisher, 24, came to investigate. Fisher jumped into the creek to find Stillwell's body, but he too was attacked by the shark in front of several horrified witnesses. Fisher was pulled from the creek without recovering Stillwell's body. His right thigh was severely injured and he bled to death at Monmouth Memorial Hospital in Long Branch. Stillwell's body was recovered 150 feet upstream from the Wyckoff Dock on July 14. The fifth and final victim, Joseph Dunn, 14, of New York City was attacked a half mile from the Wyckoff Dock nearly 30 minutes after the attacks on Stillwell and Fisher. The shark bit his left leg, but Dunn was rescued by his brother and a friend after a vicious tug-of-war with the shark. Dunn was taken to Saint Peter's University Hospital in New Brunswick. Dunn lost his leg, but otherwise recovered. There is some debate whether just one shark was responsible for all five attacks. However, there were no further attacks after a shark, that was found to have human bones in its stomach, was killed. What prompted the rash of attacks in 1916? One grisly theory is that Atlantic sharks had grown accustomed to feeding on humans after German submarine attacks.
Tags: shark  attacks  New  Jersey 
Added: 7th December 2010
Views: 3514
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Posted By: Lava1964
Death of Sam Cooke - 1964 Popular singer Sam Cooke is best remembered for his million-selling 1957 hit You Send Me. The married Cooke was something of a serial philanderer and died a rather unseemly death at age 33 on December 11, 1964, at the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles from a fatal gunshot wound to the torso. The motel's manager, Bertha Franklin, said she shot Cooke in self-defense after he broke into her office and attacked her. However, the details of the case are still in dispute. Cooke's body was found in Franklin's apartment-office, clad only in a sports jacket and shoes, but no shirt, pants or underwear. The official police record states that Franklin fatally shot Cooke who had checked in earlier that evening with a young woman. Franklin claimed that Cooke had broken into the manager's office-apartment in a rage, wearing nothing but a shoe and a sports coat demanding to know the whereabouts of the woman who had accompanied him to the hotel only a few minutes earlier. Franklin told Cooke the woman was not in the office, but the enraged Cooke did not believe her. He violently grabbed her, demanding again to know the woman's whereabouts. According to Franklin, she grappled with Cooke and the two of them fell to the floor. She got up and ran to retrieve her gun. She said she then fired at Cooke in self-defense because she feared for her life. Cooke was struck once in the torso, and according to Franklin, he exclaimed, "Lady, you shot me!" before mounting a last charge at her. She said that she beat him over his head with a broomstick before he finally fell. He was mortally wounded by the gunshot. Franklin noted she fired the gun at least three times. Franklin and the motel's owner, Evelyn Carr, had been speaking on the telephone together at the time of the incident. Thus, Carr claimed to have overheard Cooke's intrusion and the ensuing conflict and gunshots. Carr called the police to request they go to the motel, as she believed a shooting had occurred. A coroner investigated the incident. The woman who had accompanied Cooke to the motel was identified as Elisa Boyer, who had also called the police that night shortly before Carr. Boyer had called police from a telephone booth near the motel, telling them she had just escaped being kidnapped. Boyer told police that she had met Cooke earlier that night and had spent the evening in his company. She claimed that after they left a local nightclub together, she had repeatedly requested that he take her home, but he instead took her against her will to the Hacienda Motel. She claimed that once they had rented one of the motel's $3 rooms, Cooke physically forced her onto the bed and that she was certain he was going to rape her. According to Boyer, when Cooke stepped into the bathroom for a moment, she quickly grabbed her clothes and ran from the room. She claimed that in her haste, she had also scooped up most of Cooke's clothing by mistake. She said that she ran first to the manager's office and knocked on the door seeking help. However, she said the manager took too long in responding, so, fearing Cooke would soon be coming after her, she fled the motel before the manager opened the door. She claimed she put her own clothing back on, hid Cooke's clothing, and went to the telephone booth where she called police. Boyer's story is the only account of what happened between the two that night; however, her story has long been called into question. Inconsistencies between her version of events and details reported by other witnesses, as well as circumstantial evidence (e.g., thousands in cash that Cooke was reportedly carrying were never recovered, and Boyer was soon after arrested for prostitution), invited speculation that Boyer may have gone willingly to the motel with Cooke, then slipped out of the room with Cooke's clothing in order to rob him, rather than to escape an attempted rape.
Tags: Sam  Cooke  death 
Added: 15th December 2012
Views: 1700
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Posted By: Lava1964

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