Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Bringing Up Father this is a 1919, comic strip re-print book. .i had NO IDEA it had been around this long: "Bringing Up Father" was a comic strip created by George McManus that ran from January 12, 1913 to May 28, 2000. Most readers, however, called it Maggie and Jiggs, after its two main characters. The strip was about an Irishman named Jiggs living in the United States who comes into wealth but still wants to keep his old pals, eat corned beef and cabbage (sometimes called Jiggs dinner), and hang out at the tavern, much to the consternation of his wife, Maggie, a social climber.
Tags: book  comic  strip  bringing  up  father  george  mcmsnus 
Added: 6th July 2007
Views: 2863
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Awww Happy Birthday Snoopy Snoopy first made his appearance on the strip on October 4, 1950, two days after the strip premiered, and was identified by name on November 10. Schulz was originally going to call him "Sniffy" (as described in 25th anniversary book, Peanuts Jubilee, (pg. 20)), until he discovered that name was used in a different comic strip. Snoopy was a silent character for the first two years of his existence, but on May 27, 1952 he verbalized his thoughts to readers for the first time via a thought balloon; Schulz would utilize this device for nearly all of the character's appearances in the strip thereafter. In addition to Snoopy's ability to "speak" his thoughts to the reader, many of the human characters in Peanuts have the uncanny knack of reading his thoughts and responding to them.
Tags: snoopy  beagles  peanuts  comic  strips 
Added: 3rd October 2007
Views: 2347
Rating:
Posted By: Sophia
Featured Member- Lava1964 I was born in a small Canadian city in 1964. I am unmarried. Miss Right has not yet come along. I'm beginning to think she never will. As a kid, I loved acquiring knowledge on a variety of topics, hence my love of trivia. My father got me interested in history by making me watch documentaries when I was eight years old. I am truly grateful he did this. I developed my own passion for sports history. My favorite sports are baseball, boxing, tennis, hockey, football, and soccer. Baseball is far and away my favorite. I live and die with the exploits of the Boston Red Sox. (I was a Red Sox fan long before it became fashionable.) I played fastpitch softball as a kid when that was a popular pastime in Canada. I was a second baseman: Good glove, weak arm, decent contact hitter, not much power. I normally batted second. I have been a softball umpire since 1978. Last time I counted, I had worked over 2,300 games. I've always loved words and the English language. Its possibilities are truly limitless. I modestly say I am a writer of some repute. I began writing pieces for sports encyclopedias at age 19 and really haven't stopped penning sports articles since then. I used to write a weekly sports nostalgia column for a local newspaper. I allegedly had half a million readers at one time. (My column ran for five years before a dim-witted editor took over the sports department and dismissed all the freelance columnists and replaced them with hand-picked toadies. Accordingly, I have put a curse on him and his family. I've had three books on baseball history published. All have received kind reviews. I still write the occasional piece for nostalgia publications. If anyone is really interested in my stuff, I sell collections of my columns on demand. My books are available through mail order from my publisher in North Carolina. I am a tournament Scrabble player and official. I have an expert rating (which I am quite proud of) and I'm usually ranked in the top 40 in Canada. I help run a local club and local tourneys, and, for some reason, I am much in demand to officiate and organize tournaments in many places. Scrabble has allowed me to travel to Las Vegas, Reno, Phoenix, New Orleans, and this summer...Orlando. It's nice work if you can get it. It must be my aptitude for organization which I acquired from both my parents. Scrabble is quite a diverse and odd subculture. Nevertheless, my best friends are Scrabble players. The game helps me retain what is left of my sanity. Along those same lines, I enjoy all competitive endeavors. I always play to win. This is why I love game shows too, I suppose. Occasionally I do real jobs too. I've been a private tutor since 1994. My students think I'm brilliant. I always try to live up to their expectations. I think I have a good sense of humor. It's a hybrid of American and British mirth. I especially love puns. I am cuddly.
Tags: Featured  Member-  Lava1964 
Added: 1st May 2008
Views: 1653
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
Ripleys Believe It Or Not Ripley's Believe It Or Not was a regular feature in newspapers for many decades. Its creator, Robert Ripley, hoped to be a professional baseball player but an arm injury ended that dream. Instead, Ripley decided to write about sports. He compiled some odd sports facts and presented them in cartoon form. Ripley intended to call it Champs & Chumps, but settled on Believe It Or Not so he could go beyond sports. His first cartoon panel premiered in the New York Globe on December 19, 1918. At one point, there were 80 million loyal readers of Believe It Or Not in daily newspapers. Much of Ripley's research was done by Norbert Pearlroth. For 52 years, Pearlroth spent 10 hours per day, six days a week in the New York Public Library searching for obscure facts and trivia for Ripley's cartoons!
Tags: Ripleys  Believe  It  Or  Not 
Added: 29th April 2008
Views: 1561
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Dynamite Magazine Dynamite was a celebrity-oriented publication geared for young teen readers. It was available through Scholastic Book Services. The appeal of the magazine was the large number of posters it usually contained. Often there was no advertising. Robert Hegyes of Welcome Back, Kotter is featured on the cover of this issue from 1977.
Tags: Dynamite  magazine  teen  readers 
Added: 22nd October 2009
Views: 2052
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bigfoot Tabloid Story Well, I guess readers of the Weekly World News think bigfoot is real and is engaging in all sorts of naughty behavior...
Tags: bigfoot  story  tabloid 
Added: 3rd November 2009
Views: 1885
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Cat Davis Ring Magazine Cover 1978 The cover of the August 1978 issue of The Ring magazine featured boxer Cathy (Cat) Davis. Readers' responses to women's boxing in 1978 were overwhelmingly negative. To date she is the only female boxer to appear on The Ring's cover in its 88-year history.
Tags: boxing  Cat  Davis   
Added: 7th February 2010
Views: 2754
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Japanese Skull Controversy This odd photograph was published in the May 22, 1944 issue of Life magazine. It shows the girlfriend of an American soldier writing her beau a thank-you note for sending her part of the skull from a dead Japanese soldier. The photo inspired overwhelmingly negative reposnses from Life readers. Furthermore, it was a propaganda bonanza for the Japanese who used it to portray Allied servicemen as barbaric. Indeed, the mistreatment of enemy corpses was outlawed by the Geneva Convention in 1929. The soldier who mailed the partial skull stateside was reprimanded.
Tags: skull  Second  World  War  Japanese 
Added: 1st April 2010
Views: 4443
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Actor Charlie Sheen Dead At Age 46 Charlie Sheen the beloved actor of the hit TV show Two And A Half Men, embattled with alcohol, cocaine, prostitutes and adult film stars died Monday at the age of 46. To avoid a “media circus” his family had his body prepared for burial for later this week. YouRememberThat.com staffers acquired this cell phone photo from unidentified sources. In 2010, Sheen was the highest paid actor on television, earning US$1.8 million per episode of Two and a Half Men. Sheen's personal life has also made headlines, including reports about alcohol and drug abuse and marital problems as well as allegations of domestic violence. He was fired from his role on Two and a Half Men by CBS and Warner Bros. on March 7, 2011.. It is unknown if an autopsy has been performed for the cause of death; certainly after this report is made public an investigation into the cause his death will be launched. Sheen was born Carlos Irwin Estevez in New York City, the youngest son and third of four children of actor Martin Sheen and artist Janet Templeton Sheen has two older brothers, Emilio Estevez and Ramon Estevez, and a younger sister, Renée Estevez. Sheen has been married three times and has five children and it is unknown how many readers have read this article this point so far. On May 20, 1998, Sheen overdosed while using cocaine and was hospitalized. On March 7, 2011, CBS and Warner Bros. fired Sheen from Two and a Half Men. The official statement read: “After careful consideration, Warner Bros. Television has terminated Charlie Sheen's services on Two and a Half Men effective immediately.” If readers are still paying attention this, ths is an april fools joke. On February 28, 2011, during a national television interview in his home, Sheen publicly demanded a 50% raise for the show Two and a Half Men. On March 10, 2011, Sheen announced a nationwide tour, "My Violent Torpedo of Truth/Defeat is Not An Option", which is scheduled to begin in Detroit on April 2.
Tags: Charlie  Sheen  Dead,  Dead  Charlie  Sheen,  Two  and  half  men,    charlie  sheen,  harper  ,emilio  esteves,  jon  cryer,  comedy  ,spit  ,devil,funeral,jake,berta  april  fools  joke,  my  violent  torpedo  of  truth 
Added: 1st April 2011
Views: 2333
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
KO Magazine KO Magazine ('The Knockout Boxing Magazine,' as it was billed) was a boxing publication that at one time rivalled The Ring, the longtime stately 'Bible of Boxing,' for readership. It first appeared in 1980 as a monthly publication when pro boxing was experiencing a renaissance. KO quickly captured the attention of boxing fans with its well written stories, lengthy interviews--and especially its color centerfolds of prominent fighters. Its annual award issue was often filled with laugh-provoking absurdities. (One such kudo targetting TV's irritating boxing announcers was the Howard Cosell Talks A Lot But Says Nothing Award. The shortest TV fight of the year was given the Don't Get Up To Get A Beer Award.) Steve Farhood, who now writes excellent boxing pieces for Sports Illustrated, got his start at KO. KO eventually became a victim of boxing's declining popularity. It was eventually acquired by The Ring and absorbed into the latter. The last distinct issue of KO was published in 2006. Heavyweight champion Larry Holmes is shown on the cover of this issue from 1982.
Tags: boxing  magazine  KO 
Added: 12th July 2011
Views: 2362
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: [1] 2 of 2 | Random