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Side Step The Tragedy That Overtakes So Many Wives This ad for Dorothy Gray Salons begins with the subhead, "You may side-step the tragedy that overtakes so many wives..."
Tags: ad  Dorothy  Gray  wrinkle  cream 
Added: 1st November 2007
Views: 1529
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Her Jungle Love check out a sarong-clad Dorothy Lamour and Ray Milland in the 1938 film, HER JUNGLE LOVE.
Tags: film  Her  Jungle  Love  Dorothy  Lamour  Ray  Milland 
Added: 4th November 2007
Views: 1325
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Americas Sweetheart at 61 Happy Birthday to Sally Field! Sally is the daughter of actress Margaret Field and step-father Jock Mahoney, also an actor as well as a stuntman. Sally managed to finish high school, but early on it was clear she would follow in her parents' footsteps, and she soon got the lead role in the 1965 TV series "Gidget", quickly followed by "The Flying Nun" which ran from 1967-1970. American was in love with her wholesome, girl-next-door persona. The role that got Sally noticed as a more serious dramatic actress, was her portrayal of the title character in the TV movie Sybil, a woman suffering from a multiple personality disorder. The part won her an Emmy in the Best Actress category in 1976. Hollywood now saw Sally Field as more than just a pretty face. She had raw talent they were more than happy to exploit. But Sally didn't altogether abondon her comedic side and proved this by starring opposite Burt Reynolds in the two Smokey And The Bandit films. Nevertheless, her best work came through in dramatic roles, and Sally went on to win Oscars in the Best Actress category for both Norma Rae and Places In The Heart. Aside from acting, she has also produced and directed several projects for television, including directing an episode of the acclaimed mini-series, From The Earth To The Moon. Sally has two sons from her first marriage, Peter and Eli. And Samuel, from her second marriage.
Tags: sally  field  gidget  flying  nun  norma  rae  sybil  actresses 
Added: 5th November 2007
Views: 1540
Rating:
Posted By: Guido
Memories of Danny Kaye Danny was born David Daniel Kaminsky in Brooklyn in 1913, the son of an immigrant Russian tailor. After dropping out of high school he worked for a radio station and later as a comedian in the Catskills. After his solo success in the Catskills, he joined the dancing act of Harvey and Young in 1933. On opening night he lost his balance and the audience broke into a roar of laughter. He would later incorporate this into his act. Enjoying growing popularity in 1939, Danny won over the Broadway crowd that same year with his show-stopping comic singing in "Lady in the Dark," in which he rattled off the names of more than fifty polysyllabic Russian composers in 39 seconds in a song called "Tchaikovsky." Throughout the early 1940's he performed night club acts, on Broadway, and to support the troops overseas during WWII. Though he appeared in his first film in 1937, it wasnít until almost 10 years later that his film career hit its stride. Throughout his career he starred in seventeen movies, including THE KID FROM BROADWAY (1946), THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (1947), THE INSPECTOR GENERAL (1949), HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN (1952), and the incomparable THE COURT JESTER (1956). In one of his final performances, he proved the versatility of his talent and earned rave reviews for his impassioned portrayal of a Holocaust survivor in the 1981 television movie SKOKIE. In 1987 Danny died of a heart attack in Los Angeles. An amazing actor, singer, dancer, comic, and all-around entertainer, he was a Renaissance man off the stage as well as on, where he was a celebrated chef, a baseball team owner, and an airplane pilot, flying everything from Piper Cubs to Boeing 747ís. His deep and continued commitment to the betterment of the people of the world was an inspiration, and his intelligent humor created a style all his own that made him one of the most beloved entertainers of his time. In a clip from the 1952 film "Hans Christian Andersen", Danny shows off his incredible style with "Inchworm.
Tags: danny  kaye  actors  singers  comedians 
Added: 7th November 2007
Views: 2073
Rating:
Posted By: Sophia
Jethro dBodine Although not a major character, actress Sharon Tate, who was slain by the Manson Family in 1969, had a recurring role during the early years of the series. Tate appeared in a dark wig as Janet, an assistant to Miss Hathaway at the Commerce Bank.
Tags: sitcom  The  Beverly  Hillbillies  Buddy  Edsen  Irene  Ryan  Donna  Douglas  Max  Baer  Jr.  Raymon  Bailey  Nancy  Kulp  Bea  Benaderet  Harriet  E.  MacGibbon  Sharon  Tate 
Added: 8th November 2007
Views: 1647
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Frank Gorshin As Everybody Prior to his role as the Riddler in the Batman TV series, Frank Gorshin was amazing audiences with his impressions. This clip (put together from 2 parts) was taken from the Ed Sullivan Show, probably in the early 60's. If you listen closely you can hear conductor Ray Bloch give him the cue to wrap it up, which he handles with his usual finesse.
Tags: frank  gorshin  ed  sullivan  show  impressionists  60s  comedy 
Added: 12th November 2007
Views: 6142
Rating:
Posted By: Sophia
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2046
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Richard Dawson Unhappy Match Game Departure CBS had an immediate winner on its hands when it reintroduced TV audiences to Match Game in 1973. Gene Rayburn had hosted a more formal version of the game show in the 1960s, but it was never a big hit. However, the fun, free-wheeling 1970s version on CBS caught the fancy of viewers by the millions with its moderately risque questions in which TINKLE or BOOBS might be proffered as matches to the show's fill-in-the-blank format. Airing weekdays at 4:30 p.m., Match Game drew a wide variety of viewers from housewives to students getting home from school and everything in between. Although Rayburn was again the emcee, Richard Dawson, whose last major TV gig was his role as Corporal Peter Newkirk on Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1971, quickly became the show's centerpiece. Seated in the center of the bottom tier, he routinely engaged in witty and humorous banter with Gene and the contestants--and he was consistently the best player on the six-person panel. Match Game was the number-one daytime show in from 1973 until 1976. It was finally usurped by Family Feud, another game based on matching answers that was hosted by...Richard Dawson! His engaging manner absolutely shone in Family Feud. As Family Feud soared in popularity, Dawson became less interested in being a Match Game panelist. Still, Dawson was the clearly best player and would most often be selected by knowledgeable contestants when they were playing for the Super-Match jackpot question. In a candid interview long after Match Game went off the air, fellow regular panelist Brett Somers said she and Charles Nelson Reilly disliked Dawson because of his aloof personality to the point of them silently hoping he would not match the contestant. (Dawson, a non-drinker, did not socialize with the other five panelists during their boisterous lunch breaks where booze flowed freely.) In 1978, CBS expanded its afternoon soap operas to full hours and moved Match Game to a morning time slot. It was a horrendous blunder. The after-school crowd and working people could no longer watch the show. Moreover, a new gimmick--the star wheel-- was introduced. It randomized which celebrity would be used for the jackpot question. Dawson saw the star wheel as a personal slight and his mood on the show noticeably soured. His friendly banter with Gene virtually disappeared. Sensing Dawson was unhappy with Match Game, the show's producers asked if he wanted out of his contract. Dawson said yes. His final appearance on the daytime version of Match Game was episode #1285. He was shown in the opening montage holding a sign that said, "Fare thee well." At the episode's end, Gene made no announcement pertaining to Richard's impending departure--even after he was conspicuously not listed among the celebrity panelists who would be appearing on the following week's shows. Dawson left the studio without saying goodbye to anyone. He and Gene Rayburn never spoke again. Dawson coldly stated years later, "I moved on to greener pastures." Beset by declining ratings, Match Game was cancelled by CBS in 1979, although the syndicated Match Game PM ran until 1982. Rayburn died in 1999. Dawson died in 2012.
Tags: Match  Game  Richard  Dawson  unhappy  departure 
Added: 6th July 2017
Views: 303
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Kitty Genovese murder 1964 It was one of the most infamous murders in American history--not for the murder itself, but for the apparent apathy of people who presumably could have intervened to stop it. Twenty-eight year-old Kitty Genovese was returning home from her job as manager of a Hollis, New York sports bar in the early hours of March 13, 1964. She parked her red Fiat about 100 yards from her Queens, New York apartment building. Winston Moseley, a black man with no criminal record who later stated he just wanted to kill a woman, chased Genovese for a short distance, caught her, and began stabbing her repeatedly with a knife. Genovese screamed for help. One neighbor shouted, 'Leave that girl alone!' Moseley initially left the crime scene. Genovese, seriously wounded, crawled to her apartment building, but Moseley returned ten minutes later, stabbed her several more times, and sexually assaulted her. The brutal ordeal lasted for about 30 minutes. Only after Moseley left did anyone summon the police. Genovese was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital. Two weeks after she died, a scathing New York Times story (from which this photo was taken) claimed that 38 people saw or heard the assault but did nothing. Subsequent investigations into the crime claim that number was greatly exaggerated, but no fewer than 12 people probably had the opportunity to call police. One neighborhood resident preferred to drown out Genovese's screams by turning up the volume on his radio. Another, a recent immigrant from France, said she was reluctant to call the police because her English was not very good. The phrase, 'I don't want to get involved,' became synonymous with the case. Moseley was eventually caught and confessed to Genovese's murder and two others. He was originally sentenced to death, but his sentence was later reduced to life imprisonment. He once told a parole board that he had written the Genovese family a letter to apologize for the 'inconvenience' of having killed Kitty. In one interview with a parole board, Moseley tried to portray himself as the 'real victim' because he was being punished for decades while Kitty's ordeal was relatively short! Moseley's 13th attempt at obtaining parole was denied in March 2008.
Tags: Kitty  Genovese  murder   
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2048
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Gorgeous George Pro wrestling's first superstar was George Wagner, better known in the world of grappling thespians as Gorgeous George. His shtick was designed to outrage conservative-minded Americans of the 1950s. George was quick to realize it didn't matter if the patrons bought tickets to cheer him or jeer him--as long as they bought tickets. With Pomp and Circumstance as his entrance music, George would often climb into the ring clad in effeminate robes, his long hair pinned back with gold bobby pins. His valet would spray George's corner with perfume and his opponent with disinfectant. Gorgeous George was a TV icon in the early 1950s. His appearances on the tube often scored higher ratings than Milton Berle. Muhammad Ali cited Gorgeous George as the inspiration for his braggadocio. George retired from wrestling in November 1962. He died of a heart attack just 13 months year later, on December 26, 1963. He was only 48 years old.
Tags: Gorgeous  George 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 1739
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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