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Yabba-Dabba-Dabba-Dabba-Doo Song From the 1961 episode of The Flintstones titled The Hit Songwriters (featuring a special guest appearance by Hoagy Carmichael), here's a catchy tune! Bonus: The rarely seen original closing to the show follows the song.
Tags: The  Flintstones  Hoagy  Carmichael  song 
Added: 26th April 2013
Views: 2152
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jim Joyce - Missed Call Fallout About a year ago I posted a photo of teary-eyed veteran MLB umpire Jim Joyce whose blown call at first base with two outs in the ninth inning cost Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Gallaraga a rare perfect game on June 2, 2010. Amazingly, Joyce became something of a folk hero for admitting his mistake and accepting the criticism that followed. Here is an excellent inteview that Joyce conducted with MLB.com six days after the blown call in which Joyce expresses his astonishment about the support he had received.
Tags: umpire  Jim  Joyce  blown  call  MLB 
Added: 4th July 2013
Views: 666
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 694
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bannister-Landy Miracle Mile 1954 One of the most famous track-and-field events of all time occurred on August 7, 1954. In May 1954 England's 25-year-old Roger Bannister became the first runner to record a sub-four-minute mile when he ran a 3:59.4 race at Oxford. About six weeks later, Australia's John Landy, age 24, claimed the world record by running the mile in an unheard of 3:58 flat in Finland. The two men would meet head-to-head in the British Empire Games in Vancouver in August 1954 in a race as eagerly anticipated as any in history. Landy had a reputation for establishing an insurmountable early lead in races and coasting to wins. Bannister, however, was known for possessing a strong finishing kick. This rare clip is from the CBC archives in Canada; it shows the entire race. Two things to watch: Look at how the front-running Landy constantly looks behind him to see where Bannister is. Also notice that every activity on the infield came to a standstill as all eyes were glued to the "Miracle Mile" race unfolding on the track.
Tags: Miracle  Mile  Roger  Bannister  John  Landy  Vancouver  British  Empire  Games 
Added: 12th October 2016
Views: 690
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Posted By: Lava1964
WWII Hawaii Overprint Money After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, there was a legitimate fear that the Japanese would next launch a full-scale invasion of the Hawaiian Islands and occupy them. Among the consequences if that nightmare scenario actually unfolded was that all the US paper money in Hawaii would be seized from banks, businesses and private citizens and be used to finance Imperial Japan's war machine. Accordingly, a remarkable decision was made: During the first half of 1942, Hawaii's residents were ordered take their paper money to special collection areas and exchange it for new bills. Each bill had a special overprint of the word HAWAII on its reverse side. If Hawaii ever did fall to the Japanese, the US government would immediately declare the Hawaii overprint bills to be worthless. The old bills that were exchanged--about $200 million of them--were burned under the supervision of the American military. Such a calamity never occurred, of course. The overprint notes are still acceptable as legitimate US money today, although they rarely are found in general circulation.
Tags: Hawaii  WWII  money  overprint  bills 
Added: 22nd May 2017
Views: 233
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rarest Canadian Coin - 1936 Dot Cent The rarest and most desirable coin in Canadian history is the "1936 dot" one-cent coin. Only three are known to exist. Why were they struck? On January 20, 1936, King George V died shortly after his 71st birthday. As is customary with Canadian coinage, if a monarch dies anytime during a year, his/her portrait remains on all the coins minted in that year. George V was succeeded on the throne by his eldest son, Edward VIII. Anyone with even passing knowledge of the history of the British royal family ought to know that Edward VIII abdicated late in 1936 in order to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. He was succeeded by his younger brother, who became George VI. This presented a problem for the Royal Canadian Mint. It had already prepared dies for its 1937 coins with the likeness of Edward VIII, which were now outdated and useless. It was feared that the new dies with George VI's head would not be ready for striking in 1937. The mint conceived a backup plan: They would reissue the 1936 coins bearing George V's likeness, but place a dot below the 1936 date to indicate they were made during the 1937 mintage year. Only three samples of the one-cent coin bearing the distinctive dot were struck--and all three were kept by the director of the mint. As it turned out, the dies for 1937 with George VI's head were ready in time for 1937 strikes, so the 1936 dot coins were not needed. One of the three rare coins sold at auction in 2013 for about $250,000 U.S.
Tags: 1936  dot  Canadian  cent  rare  numismatics 
Added: 7th December 2017
Views: 17
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Posted By: Lava1964

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