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Remco Toys Shark Racing Car 1963 A really large and cool U-CONTROL toy racing car from 1963. Battery and kid operated. I think many kids got dizzy from this toy.
Tags: racing  collectibe  toys  old 
Added: 20th July 2009
Views: 2299
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Posted By: dezurtdude
Shirley Temple - Laugh You Son of a Gun This is a clip from the 1934 Paramount film Little Miss Marker starring Shirley Temple. Shirley was newly under contract to 20th Century Fox in 1934, but she was loaned to Paramount for this film which turned out to be a big hit. It was a mistake 20CF would not make again. Despite Temple's winning presence, this is an adult film. The movie's plot revolves around bookie Sorrowful Jones (played by Adolphe Menjou) who accepts Marthy Jane (Temple) as security for a "marker"--gamblers' lingo for an IOU--to cover a $20 horse racing wager placed by her down-and-out father. When his horse loses, the father kills himself, so Jones and his gambling syndicate cronies are left in charge of Marthy. Here Shirley, who is not quite six years old, sings Laugh, You Son of a Gun. Dorothy Dell, the actress in this clip, died shortly after the film's release in an auto accident on June 8, 1934. Although Dell looked much older, she was only 19 years old.
Tags: Shirley  Temple  Laugh  You  Son  of  a  Gun  Little  Miss  Marker 
Added: 11th February 2014
Views: 2080
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Posted By: Lava1964
ALPEN CEREAL COMMERCIAL with MELISSA SUE ANDERSON I can hear Lava's heart racing now!
Tags: VINTAGE  70  ALPEN  CEREAL  COMMERCIAL  with  MELISSA  SUE  ANDERSON   
Added: 11th April 2010
Views: 1416
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Posted By: Cliffy
Smith Corona Typewriters Smith Corona manufactured quality typewriters for more than a century--from 1886 until 1995--and was very successful at doing so until the advent of personal computers. Smith Corona's directors steadfastly refused to accept the reality that newer technology was replacing typewriters. Instead of embracing computer word processing, Smith Corona kept trying to improve its typewriter which the public had no interest in buying anymore. The company laid of 750 workers and declared bankruptcy in 1995. Smith Corona didn't go completely under, however. It still exists today--ironically as a company that produces parts and technologies for computers.
Tags: Smith  Carona  typewriters 
Added: 19th May 2010
Views: 1211
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Posted By: Lava1964
Beatrix Schuba - Figure Skater Austria's Beatrix (Trixi) Schuba was singlehandedly responsible for changing the scoring rules of figure skating--because she was so boring. Schuba won the women's world championship in both 1971 and 1972 and the gold medal at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. At the time 'compulsory figures' (also known as 'school figures') counted for a huge percentage of a skater's score and gave the sport its name. These consisted of skaters tracing patterns along the ice. Schuba was totally dominant at this aspect of her sport, but she was only a mediocre performer in the free skate. At the 1972 world championships in Calgary, Schuba had such a commanding lead after the compulsory figures that all she needed to do to win was show up for the free skate. That's basically what Schuba did. She came on the ice and skated only for a few seconds--but it was good enough for gold. The goings-on did not sit well with television audiences nor with the crowd in Calgary who felt Canada's Karen Magnussen, an excellent free skater, had been robbed of the gold medal. The next year FIS added a short program to the championships to reduce the importance of the compulsory figures. Schuba opted to retire. Compulsory figures were discontinued altogether in 1990.
Tags: Beatrix  Schuba  figure  skating 
Added: 6th June 2010
Views: 3420
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jill Kinmont 1936-2012 Jill Kinmont Boothe (February 16, 1936 February 9, 2012) was a former alpine ski racer who competed in the mid-1950s. Jill Kinmont grew up in Bishop, California, skiing and racing at Mammoth Mountain. In early 1955, she was the reigning U.S. national champion in the slalom, and a top prospect for a medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina, Italy. While competing in the downhill at the Snow Cup in Alta, Utah on January 30, 1955, she suffered a near-fatal accident which resulted in paralysis from the neck down. It ironically occurred the same week that Kinmont, about two weeks shy of her 19th birthday, was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated dated January 31, 1955. After her rehabilitation, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a B.A. in German and earned a teaching credentials from the University of Washington. She had a long career as an educator first in Washington and then in Beverly Hills, California. She taught special education at Bishop Union Elementary School from 1975 to 1996 in her hometown of Bishop. She was an accomplished painter who had many exhibitions of her artwork. Kinmont was the subject of two movies: The Other Side of the Mountain in 1975, and The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 in 1978. Both films starred Marilyn Hassett as Kinmont. Jill married trucker John Boothe in November 1976, and they made their home in Bishop until her death.
Tags: SI  jinx  Jill  Kinmont  skier 
Added: 13th February 2012
Views: 7175
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 2144
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Posted By: Lava1964
Great 1980s commercials A bunch of commercials that aired on NBC on March 25th, 1987. 1. Mounds and Almond Joy (The bars are bigger!) 2. Diet 7up (With John Goodman!) 3. McDonald's (With Happy Meal Stencils! "'Scuse me Daddy!") 4. Promo for "Stone Fox" (Starring Buddy Ebsen) 5. Pampers (Baby Racing: America's greatest sport!) 6. Promo for the "Build A Perfect Cheeseburger" contest (Sponsored by the California Beef and Dairy boards naturally) 7. Diet 7up (Guy reminds me of Larry from "Perfect Strangers") 8. Kraft Rancher's Choice Creamy Salad Dressing 9. Promo for "Roomies" (With Corey Haim!) and "Amazing Stories" (Daddy?) 10. Pepsi (This is probably my favorite commercial ever) 11. 7-Eleven (These low prices make me sad) 12. Teddy Ruxpin (And his pal Grubby) 13. Luvs (What's with all of the diaper advertising?) 14. Pizza Hut Flintstones Kids Glasses (Watch out for the Ginger Kid!) 15. New Coke (With Max Headroom!) 16. Sure Deodorant 17. Pepto Bismol 18. TV Spot for "Police Academy 4: Citizens On Patrol" (Another 80's comedy classic from Steve Gutenberg) 19. Promo for "Night Court", "The Tortelli's" and "The Bronx Zoo" ("The days of the little red brick schoolhouse are over!" You tell 'em Asner!)
Tags: 1980s  commercials  commercials  80s 
Added: 11th August 2012
Views: 3685
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Posted By: dusman
Affirmed Wins Triple Crown - 1978 When Affirmed won the thoroughbred racing's Triple Crown in 1978, the feat did not receive near as much publicity in the mainstream sports media as it should have, perhaps with good reason. There had been three Triple Crown champions in six years, including one just the year before (Seattle Slew). However, it would be 37 years before another horse (American Pharaoh) repeated the achievement. Here is Affirmed's narrow victory in the 1978 Belmont Stakes. Renowned CBS announcer Chic Anderson calls the race--the last major one of his career as he died of a heart attack the following March at age 47. Runner-up Alydar finished second in all three Triple Crown races in 1978.
Tags: Affirmed  Triple  Crown    horse  racing  Belmont  Stakes 
Added: 8th June 2015
Views: 866
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Posted By: Lava1964
John Sellers Carry Back Jockey on WML In 1961 a Florida-based thoroughbred race horse named Carry Back won both the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes. Of course Carry Back was also the odds-on favorite to complete a rare Triple Crown by winning the Belmont Stakes. Carry Back finished a disappointing seventh, however. The following night, jockey John Sellers appeared as a mystery guest on What's My Line?
Tags: Carry  Back  John  Sellers  Whats  My  Line  horse  racing 
Added: 7th October 2018
Views: 563
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Posted By: Lava1964

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