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Kim Novak the Lavender Blonde Kim Novak was born Marilyn Pauline Novak in Chicago, Illinois. She is perhaps best known for her performance in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo (1958). Her films include The French Line (1954) Pushover (1954) Phffft! (1954) Son of Sinbad (1955) 5 Against the House (1955) Picnic (1955) The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) The Eddy Duchin Story (1956) Jeanne Eagels (1957) Pal Joey (1957) Vertigo (1958) Bell, Book and Candle (1958) Middle of the Night (1959) Strangers When We Meet (1960) Pepe (1960) (Cameo) The Notorious Landlady (1962) Boys' Night Out (1962) Showman (1963) (documentary) Of Human Bondage (1964) Kiss Me, Stupid (1964) The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965) The Legend of Lylah Clare (1968) The Great Bank Robbery (1969) The White Buffalo (1977) Just a Gigolo (1979) The Mirror Crack'd (1980) I Have Been Very Pleased (1987) (short subject) The Children (1990) Liebestraum (1991) She has always been one of my favorite actresses and I think she's one of the most underrated and overlooked actresses of her generation. Kim Novak was a unique phenomenon. As the last of the "manufactured" screen goddesses and Columbia's answer to Marilyn Monroe, Kim had a more refined sex appeal than the other blond goddesses of the 1950's. She radiated a kind of mystery that harked back to the days of Garbo and Dietrich. Onscreen Kim Novak seems distant, enigmatic, thoughtful and somehow sad. She has been referred to as the reluctant goddess, the melancholy blonde and the lavender blonde. The studio created the idea that lavender was Kim Novak's favorite color as part of her movie star image. However, I think the term Lavender Blonde fits Kim Novak - it sets her apart from the sunny Doris Day or the gilded Marilyn Monroe. Lavender is closer to blue - makes you think of Madeleine in Vertigo, lost in thought by the seashore.
Tags: kim  novak  actresses  vertigo 
Added: 27th September 2007
Views: 4100
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Posted By: Naomi
Men Are Better Than Women ok, the ad for Drummond Climbing Sweaters reads: Men are better than Women! Indoors, women are useful-even plesant. On a mountain they are somthing of a drag. So don't go hauing them up a cliff just to show off your Drummond climbing sweater . . . ok!!! we'll push u off first!
Tags: ad  Drummond  climbing  sweaters 
Added: 3rd November 2007
Views: 2732
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Posted By: Teresa
Would She Still Push Them Today In 1952, opera singer Margaurite Piazza made this commercial for Camel cigarettes. In 1968, she endured three operations on her face to remove cancer, and, in 1973, she was treated for cervical and uterine cancer.
Tags: camel  cigarettes  margaurite  piazza  commercials   
Added: 15th November 2007
Views: 1106
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Posted By: Guido
Superman Loved His Sugar Smacks This integrated commercial was usually seen at the end of the show during the 1953-'54 season. That's the period when Kellogg's was pushing Sugar Smacks on The Adventures of Superman. By 1955, Clark was plugging Corn Flakes....
Tags: adventures  of  superman  george  reeves  kelloggs  commercials 
Added: 29th November 2007
Views: 1709
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Posted By: Babs64
1979 Cotton Bowl - Final Seconds Here are the final seconds of the famous 1979 Cotton Bowl game between Notre Dame and Houston. The game has gone down in Fighting Irish lore as one of Notre Dame's greatest ever comebacks--and it was. It was also a game that very few people actually saw. It was played simultaneously with the Sugar Bowl game in which Penn State and Alabama were vying for the national championship, so most neutral viewers were tuned into that game. The stadium was less than half filled because a horrible ice storm descended on Dallas the night before, preventing many of the 72,000 ticketholders from even getting to the Cotton Bowl. The temperature was around 11 degrees Fahrenheit but the wind chill pushed the temperature to below zero, which chased even more people away. By the time the game ended, there may have been about 15,000 people in attendance. The high winds severely affected play. All but one scoring play occurred at the north end of the field. Notre Dame scored the game's first 12 points, but Houston scored the next 34 to take a 22-point lead into the fourth quarter. Notre Dame quarterback Joe Montana, playing his last collegiate game, was sidelined early, suffering badly from the flu. With a body temperature of only 96 degrees Fahrenheit, he was smothered in blankets and bolstered with bowls of instant chicken soup by Notre Dame's team physician. Montana famously returned to the game in the third quarter to be its hero. People, though, tend to forget Montana's awful stats for the game: He was only 13 for 34 and had four interceptions against just one touchdown pass. Kris Haines, who caught the game-tying touchdown pass, had a temperature of 102 degrees and had secretly hoped the overnight ice storm would cause the game to be postponed.
Tags: 1979  Cotton  Bowl  Notre  Dame  Houston  Joe  Montana 
Added: 24th December 2013
Views: 1564
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Posted By: Lava1964
 Aussie and Kiwi Songs of the 60s and 70s Here's a collection of popular Aussie songs of the 60's and 70's. How many of these do you remember? Frank Ifield - Lucky Devil; Rolf Harris - Tie Me Kangaroo Down; Easybeats - Friday On My Mind; The Seekers - Georgie Girl; Bee Gees - To Love Somebody; Mixtures - Pushbike Song; Helen Reddy - I Am Women; Olivia Newton John - Let Me Be There; Noosha Fox - S-s-s Single Bed; Sherbet - Howzat
Tags: aussie  music  from  the  60s  and  70s  helen  reddy  olivia  newton  john  frank  ifield  rolph  harris  seekers  bee  gees 
Added: 26th January 2008
Views: 1824
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Posted By: Naomi
Pushin too hard The seeds 1967 The shabang show
Tags: 60's  music 
Added: 10th June 2008
Views: 1003
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Posted By: Marty6697
Sears 1970s Optical Department Spot This is a Sears ad from the 1970s. It's for their optical department, a department they pushed so hard that it had it's own jingle.
Tags: Sears  Optical  Department  1970s 
Added: 27th June 2008
Views: 1099
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Posted By: BadWX
Krakatoa Erupts 1883 The beginning of the amazing events at Krakatoa in 1883 date to May 20 when there were initial rumblings and venting from the volcano, which had been dormant for about 200 years. Over the next three months, there were regular small blasts from Krakatoa out of three vents. On August 11, ash started spewing from the small mountain. Eruptions got progressively stronger until August 26, when the catastrophe began. At noon, the volcano sent an ash cloud 20 miles into the air and tremors triggered several tsunamis. This turned out to be just a small indication, however, of what would follow the next day. For four-and-a-half hours beginning at 5:30 a.m. on August 27, there were four major and incredibly powerful eruptions. The last of these made the loudest sound ever recorded on the planet. It could be heard as far away as central Australia and the island of Rodrigues, 3,000 miles from Krakatoa. The air waves created by the eruption were detected at points all over the earth. The eruption had devastating effects on the islands near Krakatoa. It set off tremendous tsunamis that overwhelmed hundreds of villages on the coasts of Java and Sumatra. Water pushed inland several miles in certain places, with coral blocks weighing 600 tons ending up on shore. At least 35,000 people died, though exact numbers were impossible to determine. The tsunamis traveled nearly around the world--unusually high waves were noticed thousands of miles away the next day. The volcano threw so much rock, ash and pumice into the atmosphere that, in the immediate area, the sun was virtually blocked out for a couple of days. Within a couple of weeks, the sun appeared in strange colors to people all over the world because of all the fine dust in the stratosphere. Over the ensuing three months, the debris high in the sky produced vivid red sunsets. In one case, fire engines in Poughkeepsie, New York, were dispatched when people watching a sunset were sure that they were seeing a fire in the distance. Further, there is speculation that Edvard Munch's 1893 painting "The Scream" depicting a psychedelic sunset may have actually been a faithful rendering of what Munch saw in Norway in the years following the eruption of Krakatoa. The amount of dust in the atmosphere also filtered enough sun and heat that global temperatures fell significantly for a couple of years. Krakatoa was left only a tiny fraction of its former self. However, in the intervening years, a small island, Anak Krakatoa ("Son of Krakatoa") has arisen from the sea. It is growing at an average of five inches every week. This island is receiving a great deal of scientific attention, as it represents a chance to see how island ecosystems are established from scratch.
Tags: History 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 466
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
The Push Bike Song One for the Antipodean YRT members.
Tags: The  Mixtures 
Added: 18th July 2008
Views: 900
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Posted By: donmac101

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