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Lynn Swann Leaps Car in NFL Game From a 1979 Cleveland-Pittsburgh NFL game at Three Rivers Stadium: Steelers' wide receiver Lynn Swann goes deep for a pass...and ends up having to leap over a parked car! (At the time the Pittsburgh Steelers had an automobile company as a sponsor.) After this incident, the promotional cars were moved far away from the field!
Tags: Lynn  Swann  Pittsburgh  Steelers  car 
Added: 2nd November 2012
Views: 2754
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bradford City Grandstand Fire - 1985 Here is video of a terrible sports calamity: On May 11, 1985, English soccer club Bradford City were celebrating their promotion from the third division to the second division, having mathematically clinched the championship with a week to spare. The final game of the 1984-85 season at Valley Parade Stadium was against Lincoln City. More than 11,000 spectators were on hand--about twice the home average that season--to witness the festive pregame ceremonies featuring the championship trophy presentation. Yorkshire Television, with John Helm providing the commentary, was present to record the match for a tape-delayed broadcast the following day. Everyone was in a jovial mood until about 40 minutes after the match began. A fire broke out underneath Section G of the wooden grandstand--an antiquated structure that had not been modified since 1911 and was slated for demolition at the end of the season. The blaze likely started from a discarded match or cigarette that fell through the grandstand's floor boards. Beneath the grandstand was an enormous amount of flammable material; the team used the area for storage of old programs, among other things. Because of windy conditions, within four minutes a huge fire had engulfed the grandstand. There were no extinguishers nearby and no easy way to exit the grandstand in the event of an emergency. Initially it appeared that everyone was able to escape the danger by jumping onto the pitch, but 56 people died and 265 others were injured. Most of the fatalities were fans under 20 years old or over 70. One victim was Sam Firth, the club's 86-year-old former chairman. Many fans perished near locked gates or in the washrooms under the stands. Wooden grandstands were outlawed at stadiums in the UK following the tragedy. There were many heroic actions during the fire. Some 50 fans later received commendations for their rescue efforts.
Tags: soccer  Bradford  City  Fire 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1680
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
KRON-TV computerizes newsroom A 1970s promotional film about KRON-TV San Francisco doing away with typewriters and installing a computer system in its newsroom
Tags: KRON-TV  computerizes  newsroom  Television  newsroom  news  computer  computerized  cpu   
Added: 5th August 2014
Views: 1274
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
Patterson-Rademacher fight 1957 The 1950s are often described as the golden age of boxing--when depth and talent were supposedly at their finest in the sweet science. People tend to forget that the heavyweight division was rather weak for much of the decade. Contenders for the world heavyweight title were so scarce that Pete Rademacher, the 1956 Olympic gold medalist, got a coveted shot at world heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson's title in his pro debut! Having won the heavyweight laurels in Melbourne in 1956 by scoring three knockouts in his only three bouts, Rademacher, a Washingtonian, somehow persuaded the powers that be that it would be a great idea if he could fight Patterson in Seattle' Sick Stadium in a unique amateur-versus-pro matchup. Patterson agreed if the promoters could guarantee him $250,000. They did--so the fight was set for August 22, 1957. Surprisingly, Rademacher did well in the first two rounds, pressing the action and even scoring a knockdown with a hard right hand. By the fourth round, however, Patterson's class began to show. He scored one of what would be seven knockdowns of the game challenger. Eventually Rademacher was knocked out in the fifth round. The promotion barely generated financial enough interest to meet Patterson's guaranteed payday. Depending on which source you believe, Rademacher got either absolutely nothing or a laughable $1.75 for his losing effort. Undaunted, Rademacher fought hard-hitting Zora Folley in his next bout--and was knocked out again. Rademacher ended his pro boxing career with a 15-7-1 record. All seven of his defeats came at the hands of world-class fighters. As of August 2015, Pete was still alive and kicking at age 86.
Tags: Pete  Rademacher  boxing  amateur  Floyd  Patterson 
Added: 17th August 2015
Views: 1158
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Henry Ford Invents Charcoal Most people realize that Henry Ford was responsible for the assembly line--a groundbreaking factory innovation that made the manufacturing of automobiles (and everything else) go much faster. Few people, however, know that Ford also invented modern charcoal briquets! Amazingly, Ford's auto assembly line led to the development of the blackened fuel chunks. Here's what happened: One day in the 1920s Ford visited his Dearborn automobile plant and was aghast at the amount of wood that was wasted in the manufacture of his Model T cars. Ford found all types of waste to be unacceptable, so he wanted the wood bits left over from his cars' wheels and interiors to be put to a good and profitable use. He figured that since wood chips were highly flammable, they could be used as a handy portable fuel source. He consulted with some chemists and came up with the idea of charcoal pieces suitable for barbecues. Furthermore, they fit in nicely with promotional literature of the era that encouraged American consumers to buy Ford automobiles for peaceful, long drives in the country. What better way to cap off a serene weekend drive than to have a cookout using Ford's charcoal? This photo shows a package of 1920s briquets bearing the familiar Ford logo.
Tags: Henry  Ford  charcoal  inventor 
Added: 11th February 2016
Views: 1222
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Second Hundred Years - Sitcom Flop The 1960s were famous for producing far-fetched sitcoms. Here is another that aired briefly on ABC: The Second Hundred Years. Starring Monte Markham and Arthur O'Connell, its crazy plot had O'Connell playing Edwin Carpenter, a man whose gold-prospecting father (Luke) was swept by an avalanche into an Alaskan glacier in 1900. Another avalanche 67 years later conveniently exposed Luke's frozen carcass. Miraculously he was revived--without having aged in the intervening years! Thus Luke now physically resembled his 33-year-old grandson, Ken. (Luke and Ken were played by the same actor, of course, Monte Markham.) Furthermore, for national security reasons, the general public was not allowed to know about this remarkable incident. The show's plots frequently focused on Ken and Luke being able to take the other's place in social situations, and in the culture shock Luke experienced in suddenly going from 1900 to 1967. (In one episode Luke saw a go-go dancer in a cage, thought she was being held against her will, and "rescued" her.) The Second Hundred Years premiered on September 3, 1967 to fairly strong ratings, but it was universally panned by TV critics. Within a very short time it dropped into the bottom 25 network shows and was cancelled after 26 episodes. Here is a promotional clip that aired on ABC just before its premier.
Tags: Monte  Markham  The  Second  Hundred  Years  sitcom  Arthur  O 
Added: 5th April 2018
Views: 669
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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