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             Peter Paul and Mary Peter, Paul and Mary were one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. The trio comprises Peter Yarrow, Noel "Paul" Stookey and Mary Travers. They recorded their first album, Peter, Paul and Mary, the following year. It included "500 Miles", "Lemon Tree" and the Pete Seeger hit tunes "If I Had a Hammer" and "Where Have All the Flowers Gone?". The album was listed on the Billboard Magazine Top Ten list for ten months and in the Top One Hundred for over three years. By 1963 they had recorded three albums. All three were in the Top 10 the week of President Kennedy's assassination. That year the group also released "Puff the Magic Dragon", which Yarrow and Leonard Lipton had written in 1959, and performed "If I Had a Hammer" at the 1963 March on Washington, best remembered for Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Their biggest hit single was the Bob Dylan song "Blowin' in the Wind," an international #1 and the fastest selling single ever cut by Warner Bros. Records. They also sang other Bob Dylan songs, such as "The Times They Are a-Changin'" or "When the Ship Comes In". For many years after, the group was at the forefront of the civil rights movement and other causes promoting social justice. "Leaving On A Jet Plane," which in December 1969 became their only #1 hit, was written by John Denver, and first appeared on their Album 1700 in 1967. "Day Is Done," a #21 hit in June 1969, was the last Hot 100 hit the trio recorded.
Tags: peter  paul  and  mary  60 
Added: 22nd October 2007
Views: 2862
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Posted By: Sophia
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 1504
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kelloggs Flying Superman Toy A very old Kellogg's TV commercial promoting a Superman toy that you can get if you collect the tokens. It sure didn't take much to make us happy back then did it?
Tags: kelloggs  corn  flakes  superman  toy  50s  commercial 
Added: 4th November 2007
Views: 2128
Rating:
Posted By: Sophia
ABC Network Promo for 1966 A promotional spot using the female leads of three ABC Thursday night sitcoms: Bewitched, Love On A Rooftop, and That Girl. (I had never heard of Love On A Rooftop. I looked it up; it lasted just one season.)
Tags: ABC  Bewitched  That  Girl 
Added: 20th November 2007
Views: 2069
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Posted By: Lava1964
Freddy Boom Boom Cannon Frederick Anthony Picariello, or as he was known to us, Freddy Cannon, was born in Boston in 1940. When he was very young he learned to play a guitar and in high school he formed his own band. As a vocalist, he copied the style of Little Richard. He eventually signed with Swan Records in Philadelphia, a recording studio in which master music promoter Dick Clark had an interest, and who brought him national exposure through numerous appearances on American Bandstand. In 1959 he changed his name to Freddy Cannon, and was dubbed "Boom Boom" because of his thundering musical renditions, he had three Top 10 hits. Freddy also played himself in the final episode of a teen soap opera called Never Too Young in 1966. He now lives in Tarzana, California, and at 67, still continues to perform in concert. I still remember listening to his songs on a little GE transistor radio...those were the days huh?
Tags: freddy  cannon  tallahassee  lassie 
Added: 20th November 2007
Views: 2101
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Posted By: Babs64
I Love Lucy promo A CBS promo for I Love Lucy. It uses a clip from the famous episode when Lucy gives birth to Little Ricky.
Tags: I  Love  Lucy 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 1576
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Posted By: Lava1964
Shipwreck Kelly - Flagpole Sitter One of the weirder phenomena of the 1920s was the popularity of flagpole-sitting, a strange publicity gimmick mastered by Alvin (Shipwreck) Kelly. In 1924 Kelly was hired by a Hollywood press agent to promote a new film by sitting on the flagpole above the Los Angeles theater where the movie was playing. He remained there for 13 hours and 13 days, starting a bizarre national craze. By 1928 Kelly was earning over $100 per day for his stunts--fantastic money in those days. The apex of Kelly's career occurred in 1930 when he spent 1,177 hours atop a 125-foot flagpole at Atlantic City's Steel Pier. The Great Depression, however, diminished the public's appetite for such stunts. By the end of 1930 Kelly's stunts were earning him little more than pocket change. His last public appearance of any significance occurred in 1939. Broke and on welfare, Kelly dropped dead in 1952 while walking between two parked cars in New York City. Clutched tightly in one arm was a scrapbook containing clippings and momentos from his glory days as King of the Flagpole Sitters.
Tags: Shipwreck  Kelly  Flagpole  Sitter 
Added: 21st November 2007
Views: 14735
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Posted By: Lava1964
Honus Wagner baseball card The most valuable sports card in the world features Pittsburgh Pirates shortstop Honus Wagner. Printed by the American Tobacco Company in 1910, the card is quite rare. Only about 60 are known to exist. Their scarcity can be attributed to Wagner himself. A non-smoker, Wagner objected to his likeness being used to promote tobacco. The company acquiesced to Wagner's wishes and withdrew the card from production--but not before a number had entered the market. The most splendid example of the Wagner Card sold at auction in February 2007 for $2.35 million.
Tags: Honus  Wagner  baseball  card 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 1678
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Gaedel Midget Pinch Hitter Probably my favorite sports story is the day a midget, Eddie Gaedel, batted in a major league game. The date was August 19, 1951. The lacklustre St. Louis Browns were hosting the Detroit Tigers in a Sunday doubleheader. Browns' owner Bill Veeck promised that anyone who bought a ticket would see a memorable sight. He was right. Gaedel, all 3'7" of him, took part in a brewery promotion between games. Gaedel, clad it a batboy's uniform bearing the number 1/8 and carrying a toy bat, made baseball history in the first inning of the second game when he batted for outfielder Frank Saucier. Bob Cain, the Detroit pitcher, nearly doubled over in laughter at the sight of Gaedel and walked him on four pitches--all of them high. Once Gaedel trotted down to first base he was replaced by pinch runner Jim Delsing. Gaedel's picture appeared in virtually every newspaper in North America the next day. That same day American League president Will Harridge banned midgets from baseball. Most of the players involved in the stunt relished their connection to it. Jim Delsing said, 'A lot of guys have hit 50 home runs in a season, but I'm the only guy who ever ran for a midget.'
Tags: Eddie  Gaedel  baseball 
Added: 22nd November 2007
Views: 4652
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ad Promoting C.A.R.E. Packages 1948 i still recognize a lot of the brands!
Tags: 1948  C.A.R.E.  Package 
Added: 23rd November 2007
Views: 2156
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Posted By: Teresa

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