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Vanishing TV Character - Sgt Kinchloe Ivan Dixon played prisoner of war Sgt. James Kinchloe on the CBS sitcom Hogan's Heroes from 1965 to 1970. By rank, Sgt. Kinchloe (nicknamed "Kinch") was third in command of the prisoners who stealthily engaged in sabotage and espionage capers to thwart the German war machine. Sgt. Kinchloe was a "communicatins specialist" whose typical job was to send and decode radio messages. After five seasons, Dixon grew tired of the role and sought more challenging TV and movie assignments, including directing. He once complained to the producers of Hogan's Heroes that only a few of the episodes centered around Kinch and that his most common line was "Message from London, Colonel." He left the show after season five concluded in 1970. For the final season, a new black prisoner, Cpl. Richard Baker (played by Kenneth Washington), replaced Kinch and took over his position as the Heroes' communications specialist. Kinch's absence from the cast was never explained. Based on the show's premise and ongoing plot, Sgt. Kinchloe's total disappearance is hard to accept. The prisoners made certain that Stalag 13 was supposedly "escape-proof" to ensure that the easily manipulated Colonel Klink would appear efficient and remain as the camp's commander. Thus one would think that Kinchloe did not escape. So what the heck happened to him?
Tags: Kinchloe  Hogans  Heroes  Ivan  DIxon 
Added: 5th November 2014
Views: 2882
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Readers Digest August 1970 Issue Date: August 1970; Vol. 97, No. 580 Articles, subjects and contributors in this issue: COVER: Bicycle Byway by Ralph Avery. From Bach to Books by Jeffrey R. Haskell. The Crow and the Oriole by James Thurber. Boss of the Park -- Umpires -- by Bill Surface. The Plains a Boy a Summer Day by Hal Borland. 41 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Living. Russia's Menacing New Challenge in the Middle East by Joseph Alsop. We Need Our Young Activists by John D. Rockefeller 3rd. Portrait of a Mobster -- Carlos Marcello -- by William Schulz. Sexual Inadequacy -- And What Can Be Done About It by Will Bradbury. How to Talk With Your Teen Ager About Drugs by Herman W. Land. Toward a Livable Environment: I Victory in the Everglades by Jean George. II A Sensible Plan for Future Development by James Nathan Miller. The Car in the River by E. D. Fales Jr. Bold New Directions for U S High Schools by Arlene Silberman. Poverty at the Border by Lester Velie. Try Giving Yourself Away David Dunn. Japan -- All Asia Watches and Wonders by Carl T. Rowan. The Gifts of Gregory Menn by Joseph P. Blank. Better Living With Machinery by Charles McDowell Jr. L Dopa Has Set Me Free by Floyd Miller. Time to Knock Out the Vote Thieves! by Louis B. Nichols. Provocative; Prophetic Margaret Mead by David Dempsey. How to Murder Your Husband by Jean Mayer. Rugged Idaho by Don Wharton. They Go to Prison on Purpose Arthur Gordon. What the Moon Rocks Reveal by Fred Warshofsky. The Lesson of the Lemmings by Ola and Emily d'Aulaire. Bottoms Up! by Jack Goodman and Alan Green. The Duel That Changed Our History by Thomas Fleming. Paper Magic of Origami by and Akira Yoshizawa by Leland Stowe. KGB: The Swallows' Nest "KGB" by John Barron.
Tags: Readers  Digest  August  1970  articles  magazine   
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 2388
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Posted By: Cathy
Mohammed Ali refuses to join the Army Cassius Clay alias Mohammed Ali refuses to join the Army. He won't kill people of his kind in Vietnam. He even risks going to prison when he refused.
Tags: Mohammed  Ali  refuses    join  U.S.  Army  Vietnam  prison  Cassius  Clay  The  Greatest  Boxing  Stripped  of  Title 
Added: 28th April 2015
Views: 925
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Tie A Yellow Ribbon - 1973 In 1972 songwriter Irwin Levine read a newspaper story about a prisoner who was overcome with angst as his pending release from jail drew nearer. He was deeply concerned that his wife would not want to remain married after his long absence from her. The prisoner, in advance of his release, asked his wife to provide a symbol of acceptance before he arrived home. Levine and co-writer L. Russell Brown took the story and turned it into one of the truly great songs from the 1970s: Tie A Yellow Ribbon (Round The Ole Oak Tree). It was recorded by Tony Orlando and Dawn, a group which hadn't had a major hit song in nearly three years. It sold three million copies in two weeks. The song revived the group and led to their getting a CBS variety show that began as a summer replacement program in 1974 and lasted for two seasons. Tie A Yellow Ribbon reached the top of the charts in April 1973 and remained there for a month. It had equal success in the UK where it sold more than one million copies and hit the top of the charts there too. According to one source, it was the second most covered song of the 1970s, trailing only Yesterday by the Beatles. It's a classic upbeat singalong tune that is a favorite at karaoke parties. Tie A Yellow Ribbon has frequently been used to welcome home troops from overseas since the 1980s. This clip shows Tony Orlando and Dawn performing it. I bet you can't listen to it without singing along!
Tags: Tie  A  Yellow  Ribbon  Tony  Orlando  Dawn 
Added: 20th May 2015
Views: 1182
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Katyn Forest Massacre - 1940 One of the most horrifying events during the Second World War was the Katyn Forest massacres which occurred in the spring of 1940. About half the officer corps of Poland was put to death by the Soviet Union's secret police (NKVD). In August 1939 Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union--two ideological enemies--shocked the world by signing a non-aggression pact. As part of the deal, Germany was allowed a free hand to invade Poland from the west on September 1. The Soviets would invade from the east half a month later. The Poles were utterly overwhelmed. The Soviet Red Army met almost no opposition as the Polish Army was told by its government to not confront the Russians. In effect, conquered Poland was divided into two sections: one controlled by Nazi Germany, the other under the heel of the Soviet Union. Polish prisoners in the Soviet Sphere numbered about 30,000. At least 22,000 were executed methodically by gunshots to the back of their heads from close range. Along with most of the Polish officer corps, numerous intellectuals, journalists, doctors, lawyers, and professors were also killed by the NKVD on the special order of Josef Stalin. Their corpses were hastily buried in mass graves in the Katyn Forest. After the Germans attacked the Soviet Union in 1941, they learned about the mas graves. Sensing a propaganda bonanza that would demonize the USSR, they exhumed thousands of corpses. International Red Cross officials and top forensic scientists were called in by the Germans to make a report. They all agreed the massacre was done by the Soviets. Some Allied POWs were also brought in to witness the scene. One American agreed, saying the Russians were undeniably to blame. After reconquering the area, the Soviets blamed the Germans for the massacre. It took until 1990 before the Soviet Union accepted responsibility for the mass extermination of the cream of Poland's officer corps and much of its intellectual community half a century before.
Tags: Katyn  Forest  massacre  NKVD  Second  World  War 
Added: 11th June 2015
Views: 2063
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Posted By: Lava1964
James Scott - Prisoner Boxer One of the most controversial professional athletes in history was James Scott--a light heavyweight boxer who was permitted to pursue a professional ring career from within the confines of a New Jersey state prison. By the time Scott was 28 years old he had spent about half his life in reformatories or prisons. After serving time in Rahway State Prison for robbery, Scott began boxing professionally in Miami under the tutelage of Angelo and Chris Dundee in the mid-1970s. He compiled a record of 11-0-1 before trouble found him again. A car he owned was linked to a robbery and murder. Scott maintained he had merely loaned the car to friends and was utterly unaware of their plans. Law enforcement didn't buy his story and Scott was returned to Rahway prison to serve a 30-year term for parole violation. While there Scott persuaded correctional officials that a prison boxing program would benefit everyone: Prisoners would be able to release their frustrations in an acceptable manner, they could pursue professional careers upon their releases, and the overall camaraderie among all prisoners would be improved. The state thought Scott's idea had merit. Remarkably, they also allowed Scott to resume his pro boxing career--as long as his opponents were willing to fight inside the prison. Scott--whose fitness regimen reputedly included 1,500 push-ups per day--became a force to be reckoned with. He earned a top-10 ranking from the World Boxing Association in an era when the light heavyweight division was very deep. NBC and CBS each aired Scott's bouts. ABC, however, kept its distance from Scott due to his criminal convictions. Scott's biggest win came over Eddie Gregory in 1977. Gregory was the number-one-ranked contender at the time and would eventually win the WBA championship. Whenever a Scott bout was shown on TV there were numerous complaints forwarded to the network from people who did not think an incarcerated person should be allowed to pursue a pro sports career in prison. The rival World Boxing Council agreed and never did rank Scott. Eventually the WBA dropped Scott from its rankings too, largely because he would most likely have to leave Rahway to fight for a championship. With no hope of ever fighting for a title, Scott's career waned. Scott lost two of his last three fights to end his career with a record of 19-2-1. Scott's final bout, a 1981 defeat, came at the hands of Dwight Braxton who would later win world titles in the light heavyweight and cruiserweight divisions. Ironically, Braxton had been a former Rahway inmate himself. Scott was finally released from prison in 2005 when he was in his mid-sixties.
Tags: boxing  James  Scott  prisoner 
Added: 6th July 2015
Views: 1004
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jenny Jones Talk Show Guest Driven to Murder On March 6, 1995, Jenny Jones, the hostess of a TV talk show that bore her name, attempted to shock one her guests. The talk show had debuted in 1991 but had failed to deliver significant ratings until its subject matter became more sleazy starting in 1993. Jones' plan that day was to have a homosexual Michigan man named Scott Amedure admit to having a crush on his neighbor Jonathan Schmitz. Schmitz, a heterosexual, agreed to appear on the program because he had been led to believe that his secret admirer was a female. Unbeknownst to the show's staff, Schmitz had a history of mental illness, so Amedure's revelation weighed negatively on his mind. The media at the time gave a woefully incomplete account of what happened. It portrayed Schmitz as someone who became violent almost immediately. However this clip from the show--which never aired--shows that Schmitz accepted the news as gracefully as could be expected given the circumstances. Only after he received a sexually charged letter from Amedure after taping the show did Schmitz snap. He took some money from his savings account, purchased a shotgun, and fatally wounded Amedure in the latter's mobile home. Schmitz called police shortly thereafter to report what he had done. Schmitz was found guilty of second degree murder and sentenced to between 25 and 50 years in prison. A successful appeal resulted in a retrial--where Schmitz was again found guilty and the prison term was reinstated. Amedure's family won a $25 million lawsuit against The Jenny Jones Show. That decision was later overturned on appeal. The Jenny Jones Show ended in 2003.
Tags: talk  show  Jenny  Jones  murder  gay  crush  Scott  Amedure 
Added: 5th November 2015
Views: 1027
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hans Schmidt - Murdering Priest Father Hans Schmidt, a handsome Catholic priest originally from Germany, is the only person from his profession ever to be executed in American history. Born in Bavaria in 1881, Schmidt immigrated to the United States in 1909. He was first assigned to a church in Louisville, KY, but a dispute with a fellow priest prompted his relocation to St. Boniface Church in New York City. He quickly gained a reputation of being a fiery orator whose sermons often warned about the temptations of the flesh. Anna Aumuller, an attractive Austrian housekeeper employed by the rectory, caught his eye. The feeling was mutual. Contrary his vows of celibacy, Schmidt became sexually involved with Anna. It was later discovered the two were secretly married in a service of dubious legal standing performed by Schmidt himself! Anna became pregnant shortly thereafter. Schmidt realized this development would be the end of his priesthood, so he slit Anna's throat on September 2, 1913, dismembered her body, and dumped the pieces into the Hudson River. Nevertheless, the victim was identified because parts of the body had been wrapped in monogrammed linen that Anna had specially ordered. Confronted with this evidence, Schmidt confessed to the murder but attempted an insanity defense. It resulted in one hung jury but he was convicted in a second trial. Schmidt went to his death at Sing Sing Prison's electric chair on February 18, 1916. Police later found that Schmidt had another criminal enterprise: a secret apartment well stocked with counterfeiting equipment. Worse still, it was discovered that a nine-year-old girl had been murdered at Schmidt's former church in Louisville and the body--which the killer had tried to dismember--was buried in the church's basement. The church's janitor had been convicted of the crime, however.
Tags: Hans  Schmidt  murderer  priest 
Added: 14th January 2016
Views: 1084
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Posted By: Lava1964
Wall Street Bombing - 1920 One of the least remembered terrorist attacks in American history occurred just past noon on Thursday, September 16, 1920 in the hub of America's financial center--New York City's Wall Street. An unattended horse-drawn wagon loaded with a bomb containing dynamite and 500 pounds of small iron weights was parked in front of 23 Wall Street. The corner building was then the headquarters of J.P. Morgan & Co., the nation's most powerful bank. At 12:01 p.m., the timer on the bomb reached zero and a terrific explosion rocked the street. The concussion from the blast was so severe that it derailed a trolley car two blocks away. Several hundred people were injured by flying shrapnel and broken glass falling from the surrounding buildings. There were 38 fatalities--most of whom were not major financial magnates, but average Wall Street employees: clerical staff and messengers on their lunch breaks. Anarchist literature was found nearby threatening violence unless unnamed political prisoners were released. No arrests were ever made in the case, but historians and crime buffs strongly believe the bombing was carried out by an anti-capitalist/anarchist named Mario Buda who fled to Italy shortly after the bombing and stayed there until his death in 1963. Buda apparently was motivated by the arrests of fellow anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti earlier that year for the April 15, 1920 robbery of a Massachusetts shoe factory's payroll in which a security guard was killed. The only two deadlier terrorists attacks on American soil in the 20th century were the Bath School bombing of 1927 and the massive explosion at the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995. Despite the passage of nearly a century, deep shrapnel marks from the 1920 explosion are still visible on the limestone facade of 23 Wall Street.
Tags: Wall  Street  Bombing  terrorism 
Added: 15th February 2016
Views: 1426
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pickles the Pooch Finds Stolen World Cup The Jules Rimet Trophy--more commonly known as soccer's World Cup--was stolen on March 20, 1966. It was snatched from a glass display case at Methodist Central Hall in the Westminster section of London, England when the security guard assigned to keep an eye on it was temporarily absent from his post. England was going to host the quadrennial soccer tourney in three months--and the theft was a huge embarrassment for the country's Football Association. Shortly thereafter Joe Mears, the president of the F.A., received a parcel containing part of the World Cup. It was accompanied by a ransom note from a man calling himself Jackson. It demanded 15,000 British pounds in small denominations or else he would melt down the golden symbol of soccer supremacy. Mears contacted the police who arranged for a detective named Len Buggy to act on behalf of the ailing Mears who suffered from heart trouble. Buggy agreed to meet Jackson at London's Battersea Park at a specified time. Buggy brought a briefcase containing only about 500 pounds but Jackson did not bother to count it. Instead he got into Buggy's car and instructed him to drive aimlessly around London for 10 minutes. Jackson noticed a police van tailing the car. He panicked and attempted to escape on foot. He was quickly apprehended and identified as Edward Betchley, a 46-year-old army veteran. He claimed to be acting as a middle-man for a mysterious fellow he called The Pole. Betchley was the only man who was ever arrested in connection with the crime. He served two years in prison and died shortly thereafter of emphysema in 1969. The World Cup was missing for a week until David Corbett took Pickles--his mongrel dog--for a walk in the Norwich section of London on March 27. Pickles was drawn to a bundle tightly wrapped in newspaper lying near a parked car. Corbett removed the newspaper and there was the World Cup! Corbett immediately contacted police--who promptly interrogated him as a possible suspect. They finally let him go at 2:30 a.m. for lack of evidence. Pickles became a celebrity pooch. He was named Dog of the Year, was awarded a year's supply of dog food, appeared on several British TV shows, and had a feature role in a movie. Pickles was also invited to appear on TV programs in Chile, Yugoslavia and Brazil, but Corbett declined the offers as they would have required Pickles to go through strict quarantine measures and get several vaccinations to travel abroad. Corbett estimates that Pickles earned him 3000 pounds--money he put toward the purchase of a new house. When England won the World Cup on July 30, Pickles was invited to attend the team's private post-match victory party--a gathering so exclusive that even the players' wives were barred by the F.A.! Sadly Pickles accidentally suffocated in 1967 when his choke leash became entangled in a tree.
Tags: Pickles  dog  stolen  World  Cup  soccer 
Added: 19th February 2016
Views: 2264
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Posted By: Lava1964

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