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Call Her Savage   1932 Clara Gordon Bow was born in Brooklyn, New York (1905). Her early life was marred by poverty, mental illness (her mother was schizophrenic) and violence. Her mother slit Clara's throat in a rage over her decision to pursue a film career. During the early 1920s, Clara won a magazine beauty contest which led to a successful screen test. Her film career spanned eleven years from 1922 to 1933. During that time, Bow made 56 films. In 1928, she was the highest paid screen actor making $35,000 per week. With her nasal tone and heavy Brooklyn accent, her career began to decline with the advent of sound. Bow's career was damaged further by several highly publicized lawsuits for alienation of affection. She was also plagued by mental health problems that lead to repeated institutionalization throughout the remainder of her life. She died of a heart attack at age 60 in West Hollywood. . .
Tags: Clara      Bow      Call  Her  Savage      1932 
Added: 31st August 2008
Views: 1444
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Posted By: Teresa
Bewitched Switches Darrins A great many TV sitcoms have experienced cast changes during their runs. None, however, was more startling to the average viewer than when the role of Darrin Stephens on Bewitched went suddenly from Dick York to Dick Sargent in 1969. York had portrayed Darrin since the series premiered in 1964. However, York had suffered a severe back injury while filming a movie in 1959. He became heavily dependent on pain killers for sleeping and getting through the day. By 1968 York's back injury was so crippling that he had to be written out of several episodes and/or the show's shooting schedule had to be changed to accommodate his absences. Often, when York was able to work, his scenes were structured so he could lie down on a couch or a bed. Finally in January 1969 he passed out during a taping and had to be rushed to a hospital. During York's hospitalization, producer William Asher asked York if he wanted out of the show. York knew he couldn't continue so he reluctantly agreed. He was replaced by the much taller Dick Sargent who played a more assertive version of Darrin. How did the show account for the dramatic change in appearance of its leading male character? One idea was to have Darrin the victim of a spell that made him grow. Eventually it was decided that nothing would be said; Sargent just assumed York's old role without explanation. Sargent played Darrin until the show's run ended in 1972. Bewitched fans constantly debate which actor played Darrin better. Sadly, York fell on hard times after leaving the series. Bad investments drained his savings. He died in poverty in 1992.
Tags: Bewitched  two  Darrins 
Added: 21st October 2009
Views: 1560
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Posted By: Lava1964
American Cult Our new President! We now finally have a President of the people and for the people. Who better to represent a melting pot country other than a melting pot American. God Bless our new President and God Bless Our Country.
Tags: Barack  Obama  cult  war  poverty  crime  economy  president  iraq  isreal  america  american  election  current  events  mccain  bush  hope  change  tax  taxes  us  u.s.  jobs  elect 
Added: 10th January 2009
Views: 1216
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Posted By: newyork2philly
Readers Digest August 1970 Issue Date: August 1970; Vol. 97, No. 580 Articles, subjects and contributors in this issue: COVER: Bicycle Byway by Ralph Avery. From Bach to Books by Jeffrey R. Haskell. The Crow and the Oriole by James Thurber. Boss of the Park -- Umpires -- by Bill Surface. The Plains a Boy a Summer Day by Hal Borland. 41 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Living. Russia's Menacing New Challenge in the Middle East by Joseph Alsop. We Need Our Young Activists by John D. Rockefeller 3rd. Portrait of a Mobster -- Carlos Marcello -- by William Schulz. Sexual Inadequacy -- And What Can Be Done About It by Will Bradbury. How to Talk With Your Teen Ager About Drugs by Herman W. Land. Toward a Livable Environment: I Victory in the Everglades by Jean George. II A Sensible Plan for Future Development by James Nathan Miller. The Car in the River by E. D. Fales Jr. Bold New Directions for U S High Schools by Arlene Silberman. Poverty at the Border by Lester Velie. Try Giving Yourself Away David Dunn. Japan -- All Asia Watches and Wonders by Carl T. Rowan. The Gifts of Gregory Menn by Joseph P. Blank. Better Living With Machinery by Charles McDowell Jr. L Dopa Has Set Me Free by Floyd Miller. Time to Knock Out the Vote Thieves! by Louis B. Nichols. Provocative; Prophetic Margaret Mead by David Dempsey. How to Murder Your Husband by Jean Mayer. Rugged Idaho by Don Wharton. They Go to Prison on Purpose Arthur Gordon. What the Moon Rocks Reveal by Fred Warshofsky. The Lesson of the Lemmings by Ola and Emily d'Aulaire. Bottoms Up! by Jack Goodman and Alan Green. The Duel That Changed Our History by Thomas Fleming. Paper Magic of Origami by and Akira Yoshizawa by Leland Stowe. KGB: The Swallows' Nest "KGB" by John Barron.
Tags: Readers  Digest  August  1970  articles  magazine   
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 2119
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Posted By: Cathy

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