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Man Catches Bullet Between His Teeth This clip is an excerpt from an old 50's TV program called 'You Asked For It', a popular human-interest show that originally aired on TV between 1950-59. On the show, viewers were asked to send in postcards describing something that they wanted to see on television, such as the reenactment of William Tell shooting an apple off his son's head. (1950 US National Archery Champion Stan Overby performed the feat, shooting an apple off his assistant's head.) Short film clips were also presented, with the selections based upon viewer requests. As a consequence, many of the clips were presented multiple times. Some of the more popular clips included a tour of the bizarre Winchester Mystery House and the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge. The program was named 'The Art Baker Show', after the series creator and host. In April 1951, the show's title was changed to 'You Asked For It'. Originally airing on the cash-strapped DuMont Network from December 1950 to December 1951, it moved to ABC, where it remained until the end of its original run in September 1959. The show was sponsored by Skippy peanut butter and Studebaker Automobiles. I remember watching this series as a kid, but if I'd seen this show it would have definitely stood out in my memory! No way did this man perform this 'feat', but it sure must have left kids wondering back then..he probably had the bullet already in his mouth and the officer was shooting blanks...duh..I mean..shooting a real bullet almost point blank into a man's face on live tv is going to be messy, to say the least..
Tags: you  asked  for  it  art  baker  dumont  network  abc 
Added: 5th January 2008
Views: 4625
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
Lynch Mob Violence A victim of a lynch mob dangles from a bridge, circa 1910. Between 1889 and 1941, there were at least 3,811 known cases of lynching in the United States. There was never any federal anti-lynching legislation passed because southern politicians saw lynching as a necessity to maintain order in their communities. Many of these acts of vigilantism were photographed and sold as souvenir postcards!
Tags: lynching 
Added: 8th September 2008
Views: 1447
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Posted By: Lava1964
Penny Postcards In 1873 American postmaster John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped penny postcards. These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago that year. The postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. They were an instant hit with the public. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 1893 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards 'postcards,' so they were instead known as 'souvenir cards.' To adhere to the law, these cards had to be labeled 'Private Mailing Cards.' This prohibition was finally rescinded in December 24, 1901 when private companies could legally use the word 'postcard' as they pleased. The golden age of American postcards lasted until 1915. In 1908 alone, more than 677 million postcards were mailed in the United States. Below is a sample from 1905.
Tags: penny  postcards 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 1259
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bowling for Dollars Bowling for Dollars was a program that began in Baltimore in the 1960s and rapidly spread across the North American local TV landscape. Sports Illustrated once ran a story about the phenomenon. The show's concept was simple: Local bowlers tried to win a growing jackpot by rolling two consecutive strikes. If the jackpot wasn't won, it was increased for the next bowler. (If they didn't win the jackpot, contestants usually got paid a dollar per pin they knocked down.) Five-pin bowling is popular in Canada. In the version of Bowling for Dollars that aired on CKCO-TV in Kitchener, Ontario, three strikes were needed to win the jackpot--which was split with a lucky "pin pal" whose name was drawn from a Plexiglass drum of postcards sent in by viewers. The jackpot once reached a lofty $9,000. As many as nine different bowlers sometimes appeared on a 30-minute episode. Despite being low-budget and corny, Bowling for Dollars ran for a remarkable 24 years on CKCO-TV from 1971 to 1995. For most of its run, the show aired weeknights at 6:30 p.m.--right after the six o'clock news ended. This clip is likely from the early 1980s. Bill Inkol (who had the longest tenure as host) is the man holding the microphone.
Tags: Bowling  for  Dollars  Kitchener  CKCO-TV 
Added: 30th November 2013
Views: 1178
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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