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Raymond Johnson Chapman Grave Raymond Johnson Chapman (January 15, 1891 – August 17, 1920) was an American baseball player, spending his entire career as a shortstop for Cleveland. He is the second of only two Major League Baseball players to have died as a result of an injury received in a game. Chapman was hit in the head by a pitch thrown by Yankees pitcher Carl Mays. His death led Major League Baseball to establish a rule requiring umpires to replace the ball whenever it became dirty. His death was partially the reason MLB banned the spitball after the season.
Tags: Raymond  Johnson  Chapman  Grave  baseball  player    Yankees  pitcher  Carl  Mays  shortstop  for  Cleveland  spitball 
Added: 31st October 2009
Views: 1284
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Posted By: Cliffy
Steve Carlton Underwear Ad A few months ago I posted a Jockey underwear magazine ad from 1977 featuring Pete Rose. Here's another hideous ad from that series. This one features Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Steve Carlton. Would any male be caught dead in those undergarments?
Tags: Steve  Carlton  underwear  ad 
Added: 30th October 2009
Views: 2922
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Posted By: Lava1964
1919 Black Sox Scandal The worst sports scandal in American history revolved around the 1919 Chicago White Sox. The White Sox won their second American League pennant in three years and were heavily favored to beat the National League champion Cincinnati Reds in the best-of-nine World Series. But, lo and behold, the Reds won in eight games. Reporters and baseball insiders who watched the games knew something was amiss. White Sox pitchers Eddie Cicotte and Lefty Williams, the team's two aces, combined for all five Chicago losses. Their pitches seemed to lack zip. The White Sox also made uncharacteristic errors in the field and amateurish mental mistakes. It took nearly a year for evidence to surface that the eight of the White Sox had thrown the Series for gamblers. The press dubbed them the 'Black Sox,' and the eight were banned from pro baseball. Among them was the great Shoeless Joe Jackson, whose .356 career batting average is the third best ever. In order to restore the public's faith in Major League Baseball, Judge Kenesaw M. Landis was hired by the 16 team owners to serve as the sport's commissioner. He was given a lifetime contract and extraordinary powers. The White Sox did not play in another World Series until 1959.
Tags: baseball  Black  Sox  scandal 
Added: 20th November 2009
Views: 1366
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseball Hitting Famine 1968 This 1968 issue of Sports Illustrated discussed the 'hitting famine' in Major League Baseball. The offensive dearth reached its depths during the 1968 season, which baseball historians rightfully call 'the year of the pitcher.' That season Don Drysdale set a new record for consecutive shutout innings pitched. Bob Gibson's ERA was a ridiculous 1.12. Carl Yastrzemski won the American League batting title with a mere .301 average. The decline in offense can be traced back to 1962 when MLB allowed teams to raise the pitching mound beyond its rulebook height of 15 inches, if they so desired. (It was done as a knee-jerk reponse to the the big home run season of 1961.) However, the new height of the mound gave the pitchers a huge edge. The mound at Dodger Stadium was reputedly 20 inches high in the heyday of Sandy Koufax and Drysdale. The decline in offense adversely affected attendance. The hitting famine era ended when the pitcher's mound was reduced to its modern height of ten inches in 1969.
Tags: baseball  hitting  famine 
Added: 7th December 2009
Views: 1250
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Posted By: Lava1964
Steve Blass Disease Steve Blass of the Pittsburgh Pirates was one of the most dominating pitchers in the National League in 1971 and 1972. In the 1971 World Series Blass pitched two complete-game victories against the powerful Baltimore Orioles, allowing just two runs. He won a career-high 19 games in 1972 and was a member of the NL All-Star team. Then in 1973, inexplicably, the wheels fell off. Blass mysteriously lost his control. Blass' ERA ballooned to 9.85. He walked 84 batters and struck out just 27 in 88-2/3 innings. (His WHIP was 2.177; on average more than two batters per inning reached base.) Medical exams showed nothing was wrong. Blass spent most of 1974 in the minors trying to regain his form. In 1975, after a miserable spring training with the Pirates, Blass retired from baseball a month before his 33rd birthday. Scholarly baseball fans ever since have referred to a pitcher's swift, sudden, and irreversible loss of control as 'Steve Blass disease.'
Tags: Steve  Blass  baseball 
Added: 18th December 2009
Views: 2132
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jackie Robinson - First Home Run Here's a bit of baseball history: This news photo captures Jackie Robinson touching home plate after hitting his first major league home run. The date was April 18, 1947. The site was the Polo Grounds; it was the New York Giants' 1947 home opener. Robinson's homer came in the top of the third inning off Giants' pitcher Dave Koslo. The blow gave the visiting Brooklyn Dodgers a short-lived 2-1 lead. The Giants went on to win the game 10-4. Shaking Robinson's hand is #17 Tommy Tatum (who played only four games for Brooklyn in 1947). The Giants' catcher is #5 Walker Cooper.
Tags: Jackie  Robinson  home  run  baseball 
Added: 30th January 2010
Views: 12851
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Cuellar Passes Away Ex-major league pitching star Mike Cuellar died of cancer at a hospital in Florida on Friday, April 2, 2010 at the age of 72. Cuellar was the first Cuban pitching star in the majors and the first foreign-born pitcher to win a Cy Young Award. Cuellar was one of four 20-game winners the Baltimore Orioles had in 1971.
Tags: Mike  Cuellar  baseball  death 
Added: 3rd April 2010
Views: 831
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bryce Florie Injury On September 8, 2000, in a game Red-Sox Yankees televised by ESPN, Boston pitcher Bryce Florie was hit in the face with a line drive. He suffered several fractures and damaged vision. The injury ended his 2000 season. He pitched only seven games for Boston in 2001 before he was released. He lingered in the low minor leagues until 2007.
Tags: baseball  Bryce  Florie  injury 
Added: 25th April 2010
Views: 2814
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Posted By: Lava1964
Harvey Haddix Tough Loss Baseball losses don't come much tougher than the one suffered by Harvey Haddix of the Pittsburgh Pirates on May 26, 1959. Pitching in Milwaukee's County Stadium against the defending National League champion Braves, the diminutive left-handed Haddix set down batter after batter. The trouble was that Milwaukee's Lew Burdette was fashioning a shutout too. After nine innings the score was tied 0-0, but only Haddix was perfect. Haddix got through 12 innings unscathed. However Milwaukee's Felix Mantilla reached first base on a throwing error by Pirates' third baseman Don Hoak to open the bottom of the 13th inning. Mantilla advanced to second base on a sacrifice bunt by Eddie Mathews. Hank Aaron was intentionally walked to set up a force play. Joe Adcock blasted an apparent home run to end the game. Aaron foolishly left the basepath after Mantilla scored. Adcock was called out for passing Aaron and only got credit for a double. The game officially went into the books as a 1-0 Braves' win. Haddix went into the books as the man who retired 36 straight batters from the start of a game--yet lost.
Tags: Harvey  Haddix  baseball  pitcher 
Added: 5th June 2010
Views: 1132
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Posted By: Lava1964
First MLB All-Star Game 1933 The first MLB All-Star Game was played n 1933. Arch Ward, the Chicago Tribune's sports editor, came up with the idea for the game. It was to coincide with the celebration of the city’s 'Century of Progress' Exposition. By the 1930s, baseball had already established itself as America’s favorite pastime and the national exposition provided the perfect stage to introduce baseball’s best to the rest of the country. The game was originally conceived as a single, one-time event to help lift the spirits of the country during the Great Depression. However, its enormous popularity made the All-Star Game an annual event. That first All-Star Game was played on July 6, 1933 at Comiskey Park in Chicago on a day when both leagues had no games scheduled. Retired Giants' manager John McGraw was chosen to manage the National League team, while Philadelphia Athletics' manager Connie Mack led the American League team. More than 47,000 fans attended. There was one player in particular who excited fans and players alike. 'We wanted to see the Babe,' said NL starting pitcher Bill Hallahan. 'Sure, he was old and had a big waistline, but that didn’t make any difference. We were on the same field as Babe Ruth.' (The National League team is shown in the photo below.) The first run was scored in the second inning, when AL starting pitcher Lefty Gomez drove in Jimmie Dykes with a single. In the next inning, Ruth gave the fans what they came to see--a two-run homer into the right-field stands. The crowd 'roared in acclamation' for the homer, according to Baseball Almanac. The AL went on the win the game 4-2, bolstered by Ruth’s home run, Jimmy Dykes' two hits, and seven innings of two-run pitching by Lefty Gomez, who got credit for the win. The National League was led by the 'Fordham Flash,' Frankie Frisch of the St. Louis Cardinals, who had two hits (including a home run) and two hits by Bill Terry, the first baseman of the New York Giants.
Tags: baseball  all-star  game 
Added: 11th July 2010
Views: 1266
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Posted By: Lava1964

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