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Danny Thomas and Angela Cartwright The naturally black-haired Cartwright is best known as a child actress for her roles in the film THE SOUND OF MUSIC, as Danny Thomas's daughter, Linda Williams, in the 1950s TV series, MAKE ROOM FOR DADDY (a role she played from 1957 to 1964), and in the US television series as Guy Williams's and June Lockhart's daughter and middle child, Penny Robinson, in the 1960s cult sci-fi tv show, LOST IN SPACE. . how adorable was she!
Tags: Danny  Thomas  Angela  Cartwright    Linda  Williams  Brigitta  von  Trapp  Penny  Robinson 
Added: 30th November 2007
Views: 2327
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Posted By: Teresa
Evelyn Nesbit Scandal 1906 Evelyn Nesbit was a beautiful teenage model at the turn of the twentieth century. She supported herself and her widowed mother by posing for various artists and photographers. Her good looks won her a job as a Broadway chorus girl. This photo of her was taken in 1901 when Evelyn was 16. That same year she caught the eye of renowned architect and womanizer Stanford White--who was 47. White was married, but he often 'befriended' attractive teenage girls. Because of White's wealth and prestige, Evelyn's mother encouraged the relationship. White often 'entertained' young female friends in his lavish tower apartment at Madison Square Garden (which he designed). In the apartment were numerous strategically positioned mirrors and a red velvet swing. White apparently derived much pleasure watching his nubile young ladies cavort on it. According to Nesbit, White took advantage of her one night in the apartment after getting her to pose for suggestive photos in a yellow silk kimono and plying her with champagne. After deflowering Nesbit, White lost interest in her. Nesbit later became involved with Harry Thaw, the son of a Pittsburgh coal and railroad tycoon. Thaw himself was a possessive, sexual sadist who often beat Evelyn. Nevertheless, the two were married in 1905. Thaw became obsessed with Evelyn's stories about White. On June 25, 1906, Evelyn and Harry had two chance encounters with White. The first was at a cafe. The second was at a theatrical performance at Madison Square Garden's roof theatre. Thaw, who always carried a pistol, fired three shots into White's face at close range, killing him instantly. He is said to have shouted, 'You ruined my wife!' Thaw was tried twice for White's murder. The first trial ended with a deadlocked jury. At the second trial Thaw pled temporary insanity. Thaw's mother encouraged Evelyn to testify that White had raped her and Harry shot White to avenge her honor. Evelyn was supposed to get a quickie divorce and $1 million from the Thaw family. The divorce was granted, but Evelyn never got a penny. She was a minor celebrity for a few years and vanished into obscurity. She died in 1967 at the age of 82. Thaw was institutionalized until 1915 and died in 1947. Late in her life Nesbit claimed that Stanford White was the only man she ever truly loved. The story of the scandal was made into a 1955 movie starring Joan Collins titled The Girl In The Red Velvet Swing.
Tags: Evelyn  Nesbit  Stanford  White  Harry  Thaw  scandal 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 4864
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Posted By: Lava1964
1979 Cotton Bowl - Final Seconds Here are the final seconds of the famous 1979 Cotton Bowl game between Notre Dame and Houston. The game has gone down in Fighting Irish lore as one of Notre Dame's greatest ever comebacks--and it was. It was also a game that very few people actually saw. It was played simultaneously with the Sugar Bowl game in which Penn State and Alabama were vying for the national championship, so most neutral viewers were tuned into that game. The stadium was less than half filled because a horrible ice storm descended on Dallas the night before, preventing many of the 72,000 ticketholders from even getting to the Cotton Bowl. The temperature was around 11 degrees Fahrenheit but the wind chill pushed the temperature to below zero, which chased even more people away. By the time the game ended, there may have been about 15,000 people in attendance. The high winds severely affected play. All but one scoring play occurred at the north end of the field. Notre Dame scored the game's first 12 points, but Houston scored the next 34 to take a 22-point lead into the fourth quarter. Notre Dame quarterback Joe Montana, playing his last collegiate game, was sidelined early, suffering badly from the flu. With a body temperature of only 96 degrees Fahrenheit, he was smothered in blankets and bolstered with bowls of instant chicken soup by Notre Dame's team physician. Montana famously returned to the game in the third quarter to be its hero. People, though, tend to forget Montana's awful stats for the game: He was only 13 for 34 and had four interceptions against just one touchdown pass. Kris Haines, who caught the game-tying touchdown pass, had a temperature of 102 degrees and had secretly hoped the overnight ice storm would cause the game to be postponed.
Tags: 1979  Cotton  Bowl  Notre  Dame  Houston  Joe  Montana 
Added: 24th December 2013
Views: 2450
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Posted By: Lava1964
Bobby Thomsons Home Run The single most dramatic moment in American sports history: Bobby Thomson's home run that won the 1951 National League pennant for the New York Giants. The Giants had trailed the Brooklyn Dodgers by 13.5 games in August, but they won 38 of their last 44 games to finish tied with the Dodgers at the end of the season. A three-game playoff was needed to settle matters. The Giants and Dodgers split the first two games. The Dodgers were leading the deciding game 4-1 heading into the bottom of the ninth. The Giants scored a run and had two men on base with one out. Bobby Thomson came to bat...
Tags: Bobby  Thomson  home  run 
Added: 6th January 2008
Views: 1786
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Featured Member- Lava1964 I was born in a small Canadian city in 1964. I am unmarried. Miss Right has not yet come along. I'm beginning to think she never will. As a kid, I loved acquiring knowledge on a variety of topics, hence my love of trivia. My father got me interested in history by making me watch documentaries when I was eight years old. I am truly grateful he did this. I developed my own passion for sports history. My favorite sports are baseball, boxing, tennis, hockey, football, and soccer. Baseball is far and away my favorite. I live and die with the exploits of the Boston Red Sox. (I was a Red Sox fan long before it became fashionable.) I played fastpitch softball as a kid when that was a popular pastime in Canada. I was a second baseman: Good glove, weak arm, decent contact hitter, not much power. I normally batted second. I have been a softball umpire since 1978. Last time I counted, I had worked over 2,300 games. I've always loved words and the English language. Its possibilities are truly limitless. I modestly say I am a writer of some repute. I began writing pieces for sports encyclopedias at age 19 and really haven't stopped penning sports articles since then. I used to write a weekly sports nostalgia column for a local newspaper. I allegedly had half a million readers at one time. (My column ran for five years before a dim-witted editor took over the sports department and dismissed all the freelance columnists and replaced them with hand-picked toadies. Accordingly, I have put a curse on him and his family. I've had three books on baseball history published. All have received kind reviews. I still write the occasional piece for nostalgia publications. If anyone is really interested in my stuff, I sell collections of my columns on demand. My books are available through mail order from my publisher in North Carolina. I am a tournament Scrabble player and official. I have an expert rating (which I am quite proud of) and I'm usually ranked in the top 40 in Canada. I help run a local club and local tourneys, and, for some reason, I am much in demand to officiate and organize tournaments in many places. Scrabble has allowed me to travel to Las Vegas, Reno, Phoenix, New Orleans, and this summer...Orlando. It's nice work if you can get it. It must be my aptitude for organization which I acquired from both my parents. Scrabble is quite a diverse and odd subculture. Nevertheless, my best friends are Scrabble players. The game helps me retain what is left of my sanity. Along those same lines, I enjoy all competitive endeavors. I always play to win. This is why I love game shows too, I suppose. Occasionally I do real jobs too. I've been a private tutor since 1994. My students think I'm brilliant. I always try to live up to their expectations. I think I have a good sense of humor. It's a hybrid of American and British mirth. I especially love puns. I am cuddly.
Tags: Featured  Member-  Lava1964 
Added: 1st May 2008
Views: 1694
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Posted By: Steve
With a Little Help From My Friends Performed By Joe Cocker And The Grease Band Joe Cocker - With a Little Help From My Friends. Joe Cocker & The Greaseband performing With a Little Help From My Friends (NOT @ WOODSTOCK)Recorded in London, it is vintage stuff, and 100 years from its making will no doubt be respected for the historic and studious record that it is. *****IN DEDICATION, With a Little Help From My Friends - The keyboard player was Chris Stainton, another Sheffield born man (known to his friends as Robin) who went on to tour extensively with Eric Clapton. The bassist was Alan Spenner, who went on to play in the UK white soul outfit Kokomo, with rhythm guitarist Neil Hubbard. Spenner is rumoured to be the first white man to be offered a session job at Motown Records. Drummer Bruce Rowland later joined Fairport Convention from 1975 through 1979. Henry McCullough was the lead guitarist, a role he later occupied in Paul McCartney's Wings, and continues today as a solo artist.
Tags: The  Greaseband  Joe  Cocker 
Added: 14th March 2009
Views: 7652
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Posted By: mia_bambina
1943 Steel US Penny The 1943 silver-colored penny was a special wartime issue made of steel and coated with zinc. During the Second World War copper was badly needed to make shell casings. In response to the wartime demand for copper, pennies that year were made of steel. They are not great rarities, though. These coins are generally worth about 12 to 15 cents apiece in circulated condition, and as much as 50 cents or more if uncirculated.
Tags: steel  penny  numismatics 
Added: 12th December 2010
Views: 1501
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Posted By: Lava1964
Alan Napier Clavering He played The Butler on Batman, as Alfred Pennyworth 1966-68. He was in 50 movies, including Lassie Come Home 1943. The House of seven Gables 1940 Sinbad the Sailor 1947 among lots of other Classics.
Tags: Yup 
Added: 9th February 2008
Views: 1427
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Posted By: Marty6697
Pitfall Alex Trebek hosted this game show that was taped in Vancouver and later became infamous. The producers of Pitfall had big plans for this syndicated show, assuming it would get picked up by a multitude of American stations. It didn't, and many winners never collected their prizes. Alex also got stiffed. Last I heard he had never received a penny for his work as host and is still bitter about being stiffed by fellow Canadians.
Tags: Pitfall  game  show 
Added: 5th March 2008
Views: 1591
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Posted By: Lava1964
American Half Cents Nobody here is old enough to remember these coins being circulated--half cents! American half cents were minted from 1797 through 1857. They were discontinued when it became obvious that not much could be bought with half a cent. Today the penny has little purchasing power and will likely meet the same fate.
Tags: half  cents  American  coins 
Added: 23rd April 2008
Views: 1041
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Posted By: Lava1964

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