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Make A Wish Does anyone remember a kids' show called Make A Wish? It aired on ABC from 1971 to 1976. Produced by ABC News, it was hosted by musician Tom Chapin and created and produced by Lester Cooper. It replaced Discovery, a similar series for children also produced by ABC News. The series, originally broadcast on Saturday mornings but later moved to Sunday mornings, focused on a particular theme. One episode, for instance, would be about snakes; another about motorcycles. Chapin would introduce the topic in much the same manner: "I think a snake is what I'll be. Imagine all the possibilities." After that there would be a sort of free association featuring stock footage, animation, and Chapin's music and voiceover commentary. The series won a Peabody Award for Best Children's Series in 1971. The music performed on the show was written by Tom's brother, Harry Chapin. The shows relied heavily on stock footage that was cleverly edited and seemed to make sense with the running narrative of words and music. TV critics loved it. Apparently, because of licensing nightmares with the numerous owners of the stock footage and music, Make A Wish won't be available on DVD anytime soon.
Tags: Tom  Chapin  Make  A  Wish  educational  television 
Added: 8th September 2011
Views: 1662
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The 33-Inning Baseball Game - 1981 The longest game in pro baseball history occurred at McCoy Stadium in 1981 between the home Pawtucket (RI) Red Sox and visiting Rochester (NY) Red Wings of the AAA International League. It lasted a mind-boggling 33 innings. The game began on Saturday, April 18 and lasted 32 innings before being stopped. Play resumed on June 23. Only one additional inning was required as Pawtucket won 3-2 in the bottom of the 33rd inning. The game included future Hall-of-Famers Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken Jr. and 23 others who would eventually advance to MLB. Ominously the start of the game was delayed 30 minutes while a bank of lights was repaired. The game was tied 1-1 after nine innings. It remained knotted for the next 11 innings due to strong performances by both bullpens. In the top of the 21st inning, Red Wings' catcher Dave Huppert doubled, driving in a run giving Rochester a 2-1 lead. In the bottom of the inning, Pawtucket's Wade Boggs hit a double to score Dave Koza and tie the game 2-2. According to league rules, a curfew was supposed to take effect at 1 AM. However, plate umpire Dennis Cregg had an out-of-date rule book; it was missing that provision. Thus the game continued for 11 more scoreless innings. At 2 AM Pawtucket reliever Luis Aponte, who had pitched the seventh through tenth innings, received permission to go home. When Aponte got home at 3 AM, his wife Xiomara angrily asked, "Where have you been?" The pitcher responded, "At the ballpark." His wife snapped, "Like hell you have!" Because news of the game didn't appear in most newspapers until Monday, Aponte spent two nights on the couch. At the start of the 30th inning, the game became the longest in professional history, surpassing a 29-inning game in the Florida State League on June 14, 1966. As the game dragged on, food supplies ran out in the clubhouse and players took drastic measures to keep warm in the April chill. This included burning the benches in the bullpens and the broken bats in the dugouts. Meanwhile, Pawtucket general manager Mike Tamburro was attempting to reach IL president Harold Cooper so he could intervene. Cooper was eventually reached. Horrified, he ordered the game suspended after the completion of the current inning. At 4:09 AM, at the end of the 32nd inning, the game was stopped and would be resumed at a later date. At this point, there were just 19 fans left in the ballpark from the original 1,740. (One was the nephew of umpire Cregg. He had fallen asleep.) Each was given a lifetime pass to McCoy Stadium by Pawtucket owner Ben Mondor. As the players left the stadium they encountered people on their way to sunrise church services for Easter Sunday. Play resumed on June 23 when the Red Wings next returned to Pawtucket. On hand for the resumption was a sellout crowd of 5,746 fans, four television networks, and 140 members of the press from around the world. The game required just one inning and 18 minutes to finish. Pawtucket's first three batters singled. Dave Koza's drove home Marty Barrett. This photo shows on-deck hitter Wade Boggs congratulating Barrett as he touches the plate. The game had lasted a combined 8 hours and 25 minutes. A total of 882 pitches had been thrown.
Tags: minor  league  baseball  marathon  33  innings 
Added: 12th September 2011
Views: 2237
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Then and Now--Bob Hastings You might remember "Carpy" by McHale and his men on McHale's Navy. He also played Captain Ramsey on General Hospital, was also the voice of the Raven on some of the episodes of The Munsters. He was briefly the host of the game show Dealer's Choice, and had a recurring role as bar owner Tommy Kelcy on All in the Family. At the time of this posting in 2011 he is 86.
Tags: Captain  Ramsey  on  General  Hospital.  He  was  also  the  voice  of  the  Raven  on  some  of  the  episodes  of  The  Munsters.  He  was  briefly  the  host  of  the  game  show  Dealer's  Choice,  and  had  a  recurring  role  as  bar  owner  Tommy  Kelcy  on  All  in  the  Family,  McHales  Navy,  Bob  Hastings 
Added: 30th November 2011
Views: 1735
Rating:
Posted By: Cliffy
Marketing Blunder - White Coca-Cola Cans On December 1, 2011, Coca-Cola temporarily replaced its traditional red cans with a white design to draw attention to the plight of polar bears in the warming arctic. While the cause may have been good, the public's reaction to the move was overwhelmingly negative. People routinely mistook regular Coca-Cola for Diet Coke which comes in a silver can. The company received complaints from devoted fans of both Coca-Cola and Diet Coke: Diabetics and others who cannot consume sugary drinks were especially miffed when they bought the wrong product. Sales suffered as people who were looking for the traditional red cans couldn't find them. One convenience store owner in New Jersey reported that several customers tried to return opened cans when they realized they had purchased regular Coke instead of Diet Coke. On January 1, 2012, Coca-Cola ended the polar bear 'awareness program' and announced a return to the red cans of its popular 125-year-old beverage. The lesson of Coca-Cola's white can debacle? "Don't mess with the brand," said one marketing expert.
Tags: Coca-Cola  marketing  white  cans 
Added: 4th January 2012
Views: 1531
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Washington Senators Last Game - 1971 The Washington Senators' 71st and last season in the American League came to a sad and strange end on September 30, 1971. Some 14,000 disenchanted fans came to RFK stadium one last time to see the home team play the New York Yankees in a meaningless contest. Many brought along insulting and obscene banners denouncing team owner Bob Short who had announced the team was relocating to Texas for the 1972 season. Love was showered on the players, though. Even the most mediocre Senators were given hearty cheers when they first came to bat. The loudest ovation was saved for slugging fan favorite Frank Howard who responded with a home run. However, things began to turn ugly in the eighth inning just after the Senators had taken a 7-5 lead. Here's Shirley Povich's account of what happened as it appeared in the next day's Washington Post: "As if in sudden awareness that the end of major-league baseball in Washington was only one inning way, the mood hardened. 'We want Bob Short!' was the cry that picked up in loud and angry chorus, and it was the baying-fury sound of a lynch mob. Then a swarm of young kids, squirts who wouldn't know what it had meant to have a big-league team all these years, or what it would mean to lose one, flooded onto the field from all points of the stands. A public address announcement warned that the home team could forfeit the game unless the field was cleared, and pretty soon the game resumed. It got as far as two out in the ninth, the Senators' 7-5 lead intact, no Yankee on base, when one young rebel from the stands set off again. He grabbed first base and ran off with it. Some unbelievers, undaunted by the warning of forfeit, cheered, and from out of the stands poured hundreds, maybe a couple of thousand fans. They took over the infield, the outfield, grabbed off every base as a souvenir, tried to get the numbers and lights from the scoreboard or anything else removable, and by their numbers left police and the four umpires helpless to intervene. The mad scene on the field, with the athletes of both teams taking refuge in their dugouts, brought official announcement of Yankees 9, Senators 0, baseball's traditional forfeit count almost since Abner Doubleday notched the first baseball score on the handiest twig at Cooperstown. But by then the crowd-mood was philosophical, 'So what?' Or more accurately, 'So what the hell?' The Senators were finished, even if the ball game wasn't."
Tags: baseball  riot  1971  Washington  Senators 
Added: 16th January 2012
Views: 4270
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Disco Demolition Night - 1979 Disco Demolition Night--one of baseball's most ill-conceived promotions--caused a rare MLB forfeit on July 12, 1979. It occurred at Chicago's Comiskey Park between games of a Thursday doubleheader between the hometown White Sox and visiting Detroit Tigers. Popular Chicago disc jockey Steve Dahl had been fired from radio station WDAI when he mentioned--on the air--that he listened to the album-oriented rock of rival station WLUP rather than his own station's fare--predominantly disco tunes. Dahl was subsequently hired by WLUP, known locally as "The Loop." The 1979 White Sox were a mediocre team struggling to attract decent crowds, so the team's management was willing to try anything to try to draw new fans. Dahl, in conjunction with Mike Veeck (son of then-White Sox owner Bill Veeck), devised a promotion: Anyone who brought a disco record to the ballpark would be admitted for just 98 cents. The records would be collected, placed in a large crate in center field, and blown up by Dahl between games. Dahl hyped the event on The Loop, hoping that 12,000 people might show up--double the typical Thursday attendance at Comiskey Park. The turnout exceeded all expectations. An estimated 90,000 people turned up at the 52,000-seat stadium. When the box office stopped selling tickets, thousands of people still got in by climbing over walls. It was an atypical baseball crowd to be sure. Broadcasters Harry Caray and Jimmy Piersall commented on the "strange people" wandering throughout the stands. When the crate was filled with records, stadium staff stopped collecting them. The "fans" who still had records soon realized they were shaped like frisbees. A few began to throw records from the stands during the game. After the first game, a 4-1 Tigers' win, Dahl, clad in army fatigues and a helmet, proceeded to center field. The crate containing the records was rigged with explosives. Dahl led the crowd in chants of "Disco sucks!" prior to triggering the explosion. When detonated, the explosives tore a hole in the outfield grass and a small fire began burning. Dahl triumphantly circled the warning track in a jeep before leaving the field. Once Dahl left, the White Sox started warming up for the second game, but thousands of fans rushed the field. Some lit more fires. Others pulled down the batting cage and wrecked it. Bases were stolen and chunks of the outfield grass were ripped away. Most trespassers wandered around aimlessly, though a number of participants burned banners, sat on the grass, ran from security and police and threw records into the air. Veeck and Caray used the PA system to implore the fans to vacate the field, but to no avail. Eventually the field was cleared by police in riot gear. Six people reported minor injuries and 39 were arrested for disorderly conduct. The field was so badly torn up that the umpires decided the second game could not be played. The next day American League president Lee MacPhail forfeited the second game to the Tigers on the grounds that the White Sox had not provided acceptable playing conditions. For the rest of the season, fielders complained about Comiskey Park's playing surface being substandard. No AL game has been forfeited since that night.
Tags: baseball  riot  disco  Comiskey  Park 
Added: 30th January 2012
Views: 5548
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Interview With Grave Digger Driver Randy Brown I had a chance to talk with driver Randy Brown about the 30 year history of the truck Grave Digger Monster Truck. Randy told us the owner Dennis Anderson started out as a mud bogger using a 1957 Ford Pickup body. The truck was put together with what ever parts Dennis could find, competitors would kid him about that. He told them "I'll take this old junk and dig you a grave with it" and that is how they came up with the name Grave Digger came about. A themed paint job has made it a fan favorite.
Tags:  
Added: 3rd March 2012
Views: 963
Rating:
Posted By: Steve
Babe Ruth  - Final Game With Yankees This photo issued by Acme Newspictures on September 30, 1934, shows the immortal Babe Ruth exiting Griffith Stadium in Washington, D.C. following the New York Yankees' final game of the 1934 season. Washington won 5-3 in a game that took just 80 minutes to play. Ruth went 0-for-3 at the plate but did score a run before being replaced by Myril Hoag in right field. Detroit won the American League pennant in 1934, so there would be no World Series farewell for Ruth. Ruth was honored at Griffith Stadium earlier that day with gifts and he announced his retirement from baseball before a crowd of about 15,000. (Before the 1935 season Ruth was convinced to return to the game by Boston Braves owner Judge Emil Fuchs. He only played a month before quitting the last-place Braves.) Ruth's departure from the Yankees was bitter and messy. His playing skills were obviously diminishing and Lou Gehrig was now the team's star attraction. After years of unsuccessfully lobbying for the managerial position with Yankees' owner Jacob Ruppert, Ruth had had enough. This photo shows a dejected Ruth, with his head down, making his exit outside the ballpark. A boy is shown trying to chase down the Babe for an autograph, but Ruth (who usually accommodated everyone) was in a foul mood and had no time to pen the lad's baseball. A policeman is gesturing with his hands to the kid with a "not-today-son" motion. Six days earlier, on Monday, September 24, 1934, Ruth made his final Yankee Stadium appearance as a player in New York's 5-0 loss to the Boston Red Sox. He was pulled early in the game from his right feld position. There were no special ceremonies to mark the occasion. Fewer than 2,000 fans attended the game.
Tags: baseball  Babe  Ruth  Yankees  photo 
Added: 22nd May 2012
Views: 3387
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Condo -  1983 Sitcom Disaster McLean Stevenson's sixth and final sitcom in the space of 15 years was the short-lived ABC show Condo, which aired for four months in 1983. The premise of the show was that James Kirkridge (Stevenson), a middle-aged insurance salesman, was experiencing a gradual reversal in finances. Accordingly, his family had to downgrade their lifestyle so much that he and his wife Kiki (Brooke Alderson) had to sell their rambling, palatial house in the suburbs and downsize. Jesse Rodriguez (Luis Avalos), an upwardly mobile native of the Los Angeles barrio, had recently become a successful owner of a landscaping business, enabling he and his wife Maria (Yvonne Wilder) to trade up to a more upscale neighborhood. Both couples ended up purchasing condominium units right outside a quaint Los Angeles-area fairway, and became each other's not-so-neighborly next-door neighbors. The Kirkridges initially mistook the Rodriguezes as the condo's groundskeepers. When Jesse informed them that he and his clan were in fact owners of the condo next door, weariness and bigotry ensued, mostly from staunch traditionalist James. Kiki, slightly daffy but strong enough to keep James from stepping too much out of line, was a little more accepting of her Hispanic neighbors, but often experienced culture shock causing occasional friction between her and feisty Maria. There was a Romeo-and-Juliet aspect to the show: The older Kirkridge son fell in love with and married the Rodriguez daughter. Condo was rare for its time as it had an animated opening sequence. Disliked by TV critics and viewers alike, Condo was yanked by ABC after just 13 episodes. Marc Price, who played the younger Kirkridge son, moved on to play Skippy Handelman, the Keatons' awkward yet lovable next-door-neighbor in Family Ties.
Tags: Condo  TV  sitcom 
Added: 21st June 2012
Views: 2473
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Nickelodeon Commercials December 11 1993 Nickelodeon Commercials December 11, 1993 1. "Looney Tunes" End Credits 2. Up Next... 3. Dimension Cable 4. Promo for "Rugrats: The Santa Experience" 5. Shark Attack (OMG I totally forgot about this) 6. Kirby's Pinball Land 7. Happy Chanukah Bumper 8. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumper 9. Lickin' Lizards (With Michelle Trachtenberg) 10. Baby Get Well (Yep, the cheeks of babies glow neon pink when they're feverish) 11. Huffy Dr. Shock (Dr. Shock is still recovering from his mental breakdown and is prohibited from working with bicycles per a court order) 12. Chuck E. Cheese's 13. Alpha-Bits 14. Barbie Golden Dreams Motorhome 15. Barbie Fountain Pool 16. Promo for "Muppet Babies" 17. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumpers 18. Promo for "Can't Wait 'til Christmas Week" 19. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Tournament Fighters (Am I watching a video game commercial or some weird music video for an alternative band?) 20. Kirby's Dreamland (As the owner of a Game Gear, I sort of missed out on the whole Kirby thing) 21. Apple Jacks (With Devin Ratray aka Buzz from the "Home Alone" movies) 22. Station ID (Awesome) 23. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumper 24. Aladdin Gift Set 25. Sally Secrets (So she hides stickers in her prosthetic feet? Neat) 26. X-Men Video Pack at Pizza Hut (That poster is amazing) 27. Stack-a-saurus Nex (I forgot so many of these cheesy electronic board games) 28. Eat At Ralph's (Vomitastic!) 29. Power Wheels Barbie Lamborghini (While watching her spoiled, delusional child drive around the block, little Cindy's mother thought to herself, "What sort of monster have I created?") 30. Promo for "Can't Wait 'til Christmas Week" 31. "Muppet Matinee" Commercial Bumpers
Tags: Nickelodeon  Commercials  December  11  1993 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 3188
Rating:
Posted By: masonx31

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