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NHL Hockey Fight When did hockey first start letting fighting go on? I mean all other sports it is not allowed without serious consequences. Don't get me wrong I like it. Curious as to how that happened. Enjoy the Olympics!
Tags: I  love  good  Hockey  NHL  Hockey  Fight   
Added: 12th February 2010
Views: 1337
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Posted By: Marty6697
Barbara Ann Scott Canada's Barabara Ann Scott is photographed doing a 'stag leap' in this photograph from December 1947. Two months later, at age 19, she would win the women's figure skating gold medal at the 1948 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland. At the opening ceremonies for the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, the 81-year-old Scott was one of the dignitaries who brought the Olympic flag into the stadium.
Tags: Barbara  Ann  Scott  figure  skater  Olympics 
Added: 18th February 2010
Views: 1902
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team This is a photo of Canada's first Olympic hockey team. At the inaugural Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France in 1924, Canada sent a local amateur team (the Toronto Granites) to compete against the world's best. The results were horribly lopsided, to say the least: Playing three games in three days, Canada overwhelmed their Pool 'A' opponents. The Canadians thumped Czechoslovakia 30-0, Sweden 22-0, and Switzerland 33-0. In the medal round, Canada beat Great Britain 19-2 and the United States 6-1 to capture the gold medals. (Entering that final game, the Americans had outscored Belgium, France, Great Britain and Sweden by an aggregate score of 72-0.) Overall, Canada outscored its five opponents 110-3. Harry Watson scored 37 of Canada's goals. The Canadians' victory was so decisive that Canada was awarded an automatic bye into the final round at the next Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland in 1928. None of the Canadians ever played pro hockey.
Tags: hockey  Olympics  Canada 
Added: 4th March 2010
Views: 1470
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Fosbury Flop At the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, American high jumper Dick Fosbury displayed a new way of clearing the bar--head first. The international media quickly dubbed the innovative maneuver The Fosbury Flop. Since Fosbury won the gold medal, his revolutionary new style undeniably had merit. It became routine among world-class high jumpers within a few years.
Tags: Dick  Fosbury  high  Jumper 
Added: 26th April 2010
Views: 1565
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Lacrosse Lacrosse was an official medal sport in two Summer Olympics: 1904 and 1908. Canada won both 'tournaments' (if you can call them that). In 1904 at St. Louis there were only three teams competing. Two of them were Canadian. In 1908, the tourney in London consisted of one game between Canada and Great Britain. It was played more than three months after the other Olympic events had concluded! This photograph is from that game, won by Canada 14-10.
Tags: Olympic  lacrosse 
Added: 29th May 2010
Views: 1046
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Posted By: Lava1964
Beatrix Schuba - Figure Skater Austria's Beatrix (Trixi) Schuba was singlehandedly responsible for changing the scoring rules of figure skating--because she was so boring. Schuba won the women's world championship in both 1971 and 1972 and the gold medal at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. At the time 'compulsory figures' (also known as 'school figures') counted for a huge percentage of a skater's score and gave the sport its name. These consisted of skaters tracing patterns along the ice. Schuba was totally dominant at this aspect of her sport, but she was only a mediocre performer in the free skate. At the 1972 world championships in Calgary, Schuba had such a commanding lead after the compulsory figures that all she needed to do to win was show up for the free skate. That's basically what Schuba did. She came on the ice and skated only for a few seconds--but it was good enough for gold. The goings-on did not sit well with television audiences nor with the crowd in Calgary who felt Canada's Karen Magnussen, an excellent free skater, had been robbed of the gold medal. The next year FIS added a short program to the championships to reduce the importance of the compulsory figures. Schuba opted to retire. Compulsory figures were discontinued altogether in 1990.
Tags: Beatrix  Schuba  figure  skating 
Added: 6th June 2010
Views: 3487
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tennis Prodigy Jennifer Capriati Tennis prodigy Jennifer Capriati was just shy of her fourteenth birthday when she graced the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1990. Her father and one-time coach, Stefano, wanted Jennifer to turn pro at 13 but the WTA's rules would not allow for anyone to play in a professional event until the month of her fourteenth birthday. (Jennifer's birthday is March 29, 1976.) With much fanfare she reached the final of her first two pro tourneys and was ranked eighth in the world by the end of the year. She won a gold medal at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and things looked totally promising. However, Capriati had a disappointing 1993. By 1994 she had been arrested for shoplifting a $35 ring and marijuana possession. To prevent further 'burn-out cases' among young players, the WTA instituted rules restricting the number of events players under 16 could enter. A Capriati comeback had moderate success, but Capriati was out of tennis by 2004 at age 28. On June 28, 2010, Capriati was recovering from an overdose of prescription drugs, according to a family spokesman.
Tags: Jennifer  Capriati 
Added: 28th June 2010
Views: 1158
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Posted By: Lava1964
1912 British Olympic Womens Swim Team These four swimmers represented Great Britain at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm. They won the gold medal in the 4 x 100 relay. My research says they are Belle Moore, Jennie Fletcher, Annie Speirs, and Irene Steer, although I don't know which one is which. (I don't know who the dour lady in the middle is. A chaperon or coach, perhaps? She looks like a million laughs.) Women's swimming made its debut in these 1912 Olympics. The British team's winning time was five minutes, 52.8 seconds. By comparison, the gold-medal-winning time of the Australian team at the 2008 Beijing Olympics was three minutes, 52.69 seconds--more than two full minutes ahead of the 1912 pace. The entire 1912 Olympic swimming program was contested in just one day.
Tags: Olympics  swimming  British  women 
Added: 21st September 2010
Views: 4231
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Posted By: Lava1964
1940 Olympics Poster The 1940 Summer Olympics were originally scheduled to be held in Tokyo. With Japan deeply embroiled in the Second World War, those plans were scuttled. The International Olympic Committee opted to move the Games to Helsinki, Finland, as this poster shows. This also proved to be impractical when the Finns began fighting the Russians. The IOC sensibly chose to suspend the Games until the war stopped. (Helsinki hosted the 1952 Summer Olympics. Tokyo got the 1964 Games.)
Tags: 1940  Olympics  Helsinki  Finland  cancelled 
Added: 9th January 2011
Views: 1752
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins - 1972 Stanley Cup Champs I posted this on the CBC News website in Canada following the Boston Bruins' Stanley Cup championship on June 15, 2011. It got such a wonderful response that I thought I'd share it here too: It had been 14,279 days since captain Johnny Bucyk hoisted the Boston Bruins' last Stanley Cup on May 11, 1972. To put things in perspective... Richard Nixon was in the White House. America still had combat troops in Vietnam. If you bought a quarter's worth of candy, you could get sick eating it all. Pitchers still batted in the American League. There was no such thing as rap music or punk rock. Nobody considered the possibility of terrorist attacks at the Olympics. The NHL had 14 teams. Few players wore helmets. Some goalies didn't wear masks. Nobody seriously thought hockey players from the USSR were good. There were hardly any McDonald's Restaurants in Canada. There were very few Tim Hortons either. Archie Bunker was in his heyday. Television sets had rabbit ears. Nobody thought the world was in peril from global warming or climate change or whatever they're calling it this week. Lotteries were illegal in Canada. Arthur Godfrey Time had still been on the radio two weeks earlier. Calculators could perform four functions and cost $179. Most people had rotary telephones. Forget about DVD players--VCRs didn't exist. The idea of bottled water would have been laughable. Computers were enormous things that occupied entire rooms and did simple calculations using punch cards. Hardware meant hammers and wrenches. Software didn't mean anything. People still sent telegrams. Life Magazine was still around. Canada still had the death penalty. O.J. Simpson was a hero. The Lord's Prayer was recited in public schools. Nobody thought it was wrong. A new car cost $2500. Hockey cards were a dime a pack--and they came with pink bubble gum covered in powdered sugar. Bobby Orr was the greatest player in the NHL. (Thirty-nine years later he's still the greatest of all time.).
Tags: hockey  Boston  Bruins  1972  Stanley  Cup 
Added: 16th June 2011
Views: 3518
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Posted By: Lava1964

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