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Was Dorothy Kilgallen Murdered Here's one for you conspiracy theorists to ponder: Was newspaper columnist Dorothy Kilgallen murdered? Famous for her role as a permanent panelist on the CBS show What's My Line? and for her Voice of Broadway entertainment/gossip column in the New York Journal American, Kilgallen often covered major news events--especially murder trials. She reported on the Sam Sheppard murder trial and the Lindbergh kidnapping case, among others. She also expressed serious doubts about the Warren Commission's investigation of JFK's murder. Kilgallen interviewed Jack Ruby in prison shortly before her death on November 8, 1965. Just hours after she had appeared live and quite chipper on What's My Line? from 10:30 to 11 p.m., the 52-year-old Kilgallen was found dead in her Manhattan home, fully clothed, sitting up on a bed in which she did not sleep still wearing the makeup and false eyelashes she had on the previous night. (Dorothy always removed her false eyelashes before retiring for the night.) A book she had finished reading months ago was on her bed. She needed glasses to read but her spectacles were nowhere near her. Although alcohol and barbiturates were found in her blood stream and a mysterious pink liquid in her stomach, Kilgallen's official cause of death was listed as undetermined. At least three different people in the household claim to have been the first to discover Dorothy dead on the bed: Her secretary, her hairdresser, and her maid. Reports of the time when Dorothy's body was discovered vary wildly--anywhere from about 10:30 a.m. to about 3 p.m. The coroner who did the paperwork was responsible for autopsies in Brooklyn--not Manhattan. Kilgallen's notes from her interview with Jack Ruby were never found--leading conspiracy theorists to wonder whether she had been silenced.
Tags: Dorothy  Kilgallen  death  conspiracy 
Added: 17th November 2007
Views: 2473
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hockey Night in Canada titles from a 1981 Stanley Cup match comes the titles n' classic theme tune for CBC's HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA. Generations of hockey fans were instantly invigorated by the opening notes of the theme, up until CBC opted not to pay the requested royalties and go for an entirely new piece of music. Rival network CTV subsequently snapped up the rights to the original theme.
Tags: hockey  night  in  Canada  theme  music  song  bumper  graphics  sports  1980s  1981  1970s 
Added: 1st July 2009
Views: 1316
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Posted By: robatsea
Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes - The Love I Lost Tags: Harold  Melvin  and  the  Blue  Notes  -  The  Love  I  Lost  70s  1970s  music 
Added: 20th July 2009
Views: 1207
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob
100 000-Dollar Gold Certificate You don't see too many of these circulating nowadays. Woodrow Wilson's portrait appears on this $100,000 gold certificate from 1934. Such banknotes were almost exclusively used for transferring funds between Federal Reserve banks. This denomination is no longer printed, but it is still legal tender. Since 1969, the $100 bill has been the largest denomination banknote printed in the United States.
Tags: gold  certificate  numismatics 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 2104
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Posted By: Lava1964
Son of the Late Dana Plato Commits Suicide Almost exactly 11 years later, Plato's son, Tyler Lambert, committed suicide at the age of 25. According to Richardson, her grandson, a cameraman and amateur songwriter, had long struggled with his mother's premature death at age 36. Plato died of a prescription pill overdose on May 8, 1999. It was around the time of Mother's Day, Richardson notes, making the anniversary that much harder.
Tags: Son  of  the  Late  Dana  Plato  Commits  Suicide 
Added: 25th May 2010
Views: 1030
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Posted By: Old Fart
Penny Postcards In 1873 American postmaster John Creswell introduced the first pre-stamped penny postcards. These first postcards depicted the Interstate Industrial Exposition that took place in Chicago that year. The postcards were made because people were looking for an easier way to send quick notes. They were an instant hit with the public. The first postcard to be printed as a souvenir in the United States was created in 1893 to advertise the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The Post Office was the only establishment allowed to print postcards, and it held its monopoly until May 19, 1898, when Congress passed the Private Mailing Card Act which allowed private publishers and printers to produce postcards. Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards 'postcards,' so they were instead known as 'souvenir cards.' To adhere to the law, these cards had to be labeled 'Private Mailing Cards.' This prohibition was finally rescinded in December 24, 1901 when private companies could legally use the word 'postcard' as they pleased. The golden age of American postcards lasted until 1915. In 1908 alone, more than 677 million postcards were mailed in the United States. Below is a sample from 1905.
Tags: penny  postcards 
Added: 1st November 2010
Views: 1228
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Posted By: Lava1964
1896 Five-Dollar Silver Certificate Controversy A new series of $1, $2 and $5 banknotes were printed by the U.S. government in 1896. Known to collectors as the "educational series," the banknotes used classical art motifs to promote advancements in science. For example, the $5 silver certificate's design (shown below) highlighted the new importance that electricity brought to modern society. However, the naked breasts on the female figures sent some prudish folks into a tizzy. Some merchants and bankers in Boston considered the $5 bills to be obscene and refused to accept them--thus creating the term 'banned in Boston.' Despite the controversy, many banknote collectors consider the 1896 series to be the most beautiful ever produced by the U.S. government.
Tags: 1896  banknotes  numismatics  controversy 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 2858
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Posted By: Lava1964
Sexist Volkswagen Ad Hubby better buy a Volkswagen because, as the text of this 1960s ad notes, it's a well known fact that "women are soft and gentle, but they hit things."
Tags: sexist  Volkswagen  ad 
Added: 26th March 2012
Views: 1921
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Posted By: Lava1964
Charley Ross Abduction Case - 1874 The first prominent child abduction in American history was the Charley Ross case. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross was playing with his five-year-old brother Walter in the front yard of their home in the affluent Germantown section of Philadelphia. Two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. They offered the two brothers candy and fireworks if they would take a ride into town with them. The naive youngsters agreed. After a short ride, the carriage stopped in front of a store. Walter was given a quarter to buy fireworks. When he came out of the store, the carriage was gone. A sobbing Walter was found by a policeman. Walter explained what had happened. He described one of the men as having "a monkey nose." Not long afterward, ransom demands were mailed to Charley's father, Christian Ross, from various post offices in and around Philadelphia. The notes demanded the enormous sum of $20,000 for the boy's safe return. Christian was heavily in debt following the 1873 stock market crash and could not afford to play the ransom. The Pinkerton Detective Agency circulated thousands of handbills with an artist's drawing of Charley's face which made the case national news. Attempts to meet with the kidnappers on several occasions failed when the abductors never showed up. There were no significant developments in the case until December 1874 when two career criminals were shot while attempting to burglarize a judge's home in Long Island. One intruder, Bill Mosher, died instantly. The other, Joe Douglas, was mortally wounded. Before he died, Douglas confessed that he and Mosher had kidnapped Charley Ross in July. Contradictory statements were given as to whether the boy was still alive. Walter was taken to Long Island to identify the dead twosome. He agreed they were the men who had taken him for the carriage ride in July. Mosher was easily identified because of his deformed "monkey nose." The Ross family resolutely continued to pursue leads for Charley well into the 1930s. Hundreds of would-be Charley Rosses were investigated. None could be proven as legitimate. It is believed the admonition, "Don't take candy from strangers" was inspired by the Charley Ross kidnapping.
Tags: Charley  Ross  kidnapping  child  abduction 
Added: 17th July 2014
Views: 1261
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 1223
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Posted By: Lava1964

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