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Bloody Wednesday "Overshadowing September 11, 2001, another September day 139 years earlier remains the bloodiest single day in American history. On September 17, 1862, there were more than twice the number of fatalities that were suffered in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon . The number of casualties at Antietam was four times greater than American casualties at Normandy. more American soldiers died at Sharspburg (The Confederate name for the battle) than died in combat in all the other wars fought by this country in the nineteenth century combined:" — James McPherson, historian This day has come to be remembered as Bloody Wednesday Bloody Wednesday Sharpsburg - September 17, 1862 Photos .. Library of Congress The Alexander Gardner Collection John L. Smith http://flickr.com/photos/johnsmith/ Bethany L King http://flickr.com/photos/bethanyking/ and Carol Miller http://flickr.com/photos/cawarfel/ Film Clips "Glory" Tri-Star Pictures Directed by Edward Zwick Clip Editor: Drew McLaughlin http://youtube.com/profile?user=weben... Music Fife and Gun Old Friends Randy Edelman Going Home John Frizzell and Randy Edelman Preformed by Mary Fahl For more on The Battle of Antietam visit: http://www.nps.gov/archive/anti/home.htm http://www.civilwarhome.com/antietam.htm and http://aotw.org/ For information on Civil War Reenactments: http://www.cwreenactors.com/index.php http://www.sutler.net/eventlist.asp and http://www.ncwa.org/ Conceived and produced by Dale Caruso I want to add an additional site that I happened upon after completion and uploading of the project. I highly recommend this ... The Civil War Home Page http://www.civil-war.net/
Tags:     Antietam    Sharpsburg    Civil    War    reenactors    Glory     
Added: 27th September 2008
Views: 1580
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Wayne Gretzky Interview 1980 Nineteen-year-old rookie sensation Wayne Gretzky is interviewed by Dave Hodge of Hockey Night in Canada. It was a postgame chat following an 8-5 Edmonton Oilers' victory in Toronto over the Maple Leafs on March 29, 1980. Gretzky had two goals and four assists in his team's victory. Gretzky displays experience and maturity beyond his years in answering Hodge's questions.
Tags: NHL  Wayne  Gretzky 
Added: 18th November 2008
Views: 1549
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Posted By: Lava1964
Horatio Alger Novels In the late decades of the nineteenth century, one of the best selling authors in America was Horatio Alger, Jr. His series of books, aimed at teenage boys, were widely praised for extolling positive virtues. The stories were formulaic: A poor, downtrodden youth would invariably achieve middle-class respectability through hard work, dedication and frugality. Often the hero's rise was aided by an established older member of society whom the youth had helped. Today, the term 'a Horatio Alger story' refers to any rags-to-riches tale. Alger himself led a checkered life. He abruptly left his position as a minister of a Massachusetts church in 1866 after accusations of pederasty with two male teenage parishoners. (This was not widely known until years later.) Unlike his novel characters who saved their pennies for a rainy day, Alger was a spendthrift who squandered his considerable earnings. He died virtually penniless in the care of his sister in 1899.
Tags: Horatio  Alger  author 
Added: 20th October 2009
Views: 974
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Waitkus Shooting 1949 Ballplayer Eddie Waitkus was the shooting victim of an obsessed female fan. Waitkus had broken into the National League with the Chicago Cubs in 1941 but was traded to the Philadelphia Phillies in 1949. Nineteen-year-old Ruth Ann Steinhagen of Chicago had become obsessed with Waitkus as a 14-year-old. When he was traded to the Phillies, she snapped. During a Phillies' road trip to Chicago on June 14, 1949, Steinhagen checked into the Edgewater Beach Hotel where the Phillies were staying. She left a note for Waitkus to come to her hotel room to discuss urgent business. Believing the note to be from a friend of a friend, Waitkus arrived at Steinhagen's room and was invited in. Steinhagen briefly excused herself and returned with a rifle. Steinhagen blurted, 'You're not going to bother me anymore!' Then she shot Waitkus in the chest and calmly phoned the hotel's front desk to report the shooting. Waitkus nearly died on the operating table several times, but pulled through. He continued his major league career until 1955. Steinhagen was never charged with a crime. Instead she was committed to a mental institution. After three years she was deemed sane and released. Waitkus' shooting inspired Bernard Malamud's story 'The Natural.' Waitkus died in 1972, at age 53, of esophogeal cancer. Steinhagen is said to still live on Chicago's north side.
Tags: Eddie  Waitkus  shooting  Ruth  Ann  Steinhagen 
Added: 26th October 2009
Views: 2811
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing Day - Commonwealth Nations From Wiki: Boxing Day was traditionally a day on which the servants had a day off from their duties. Because of this the gentry would eat cold cuts and have a buffet-style feast prepared by the servants in advance. In modern times many families will still follow this tradition by eating a family-style buffet lunch, with cold cuts rather than a full cooked meal. It is a time for family, parlour games and sports in the UK. The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes were placed outside churches used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year on the day after Christmas. However, the exact etymology of the term "Boxing" is unclear, with several competing theories, none of which is definitively true. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800's, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. The establishment of Boxing Day as a defined public holiday under the legislation that created the UK's Bank Holidays started the separation of 'Boxing Day' from the 'Feast of St Stephen', and today it is almost entirely a secular holiday with a tradition of shopping and post-Christmas sales starting. We invite people who celebrate this holiday to contribute to the information here.
Tags: Boxing  Day  Commonwealth  Nations 
Added: 26th December 2009
Views: 1085
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Posted By: Admin
Dr Batty Asthma Cigarettes According to this nineteenth century ad, Dr. Batty's cigarettes help control asthma and just about anything else that might ail you--but they're not recommended for children under six years old.
Tags: cigarette  ad 
Added: 2nd March 2010
Views: 6674
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Posted By: Lava1964
Cigar Store Indians Cigar store Indians (or wooden Indians) were used by tobacconists as garish advertising figures. At one point in the late nineteenth century, the cigar store Indian was a tobacco icon much like striped poles were for barber shops or three gold balls were for pawn shops. The figures were often three-dimensional wooden sculptures several feet tall; some were life-sized. They were first utilized because of the general illiteracy of the populace. American Indians and tobacco had always been associated. Since Indians had introduced tobacco to Europeans, the depiction of native people on smoke-shop signs was inevitable. As early as the seventeenth century, European tobacconists used figures of American Indians to advertise their shops. The statues began to lose their prominence in twentieth century America largely because cities began restricting the presence of intrusive objects on public sidewalks. Most surviving figures are museum pieces and collectors' items.
Tags: cigar  store  Indian 
Added: 20th June 2010
Views: 1721
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Posted By: Lava1964
Advice For Homely Women Booklet This nineteenth century newspaper advertisement gives hope to all the homely women out there.
Tags: homely  women  advice 
Added: 21st May 2011
Views: 1498
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Beast of Chicago - 19th Century Serial Killer Outwardly mild H.H. Holmes was actually a brutal and ruthless nineteenth-century serial killer who rightfully earned the moniker 'The Beast of Chicago.' From 1888 to 1894 Holmes killed a minimum of 27 victims and perhaps more than 200. In 1886 Holmes began working at a drugstore at the corner of South Wallace and West 63rd Street in Chicago. He eventually became the proprietor after the former owner mysteriously disappeared. The drugstore did quite well, and Holmes — who became known as Dr. Holmes — used the profits to build himself a three-story tall, city-block long, home across the street. It was Holmes' 'murder castle.'--equipped with acid vats, trap doors, secret entrances, and gas chambers. Holmes lured people to the castle, killed them, and sold their skeletons to medical professionals. He was eventually hanged, but not before being convicted of 27 murders, and suspected of at least 173 more. Erik Larson’s award-winning 2003 book, The Devil in the White City, told Holmes’ twisted tale so well that Leonardo DiCaprio purchased the rights to the film; he’s expected to play Holmes.
Tags: murderer  Holmes  Chicago 
Added: 15th June 2011
Views: 2091
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Posted By: Lava1964
Oakland As Mustache Gang 1972 Nineteenth-century baseball players regularly sported mustaches. After the turn of the twentieth century, though, most ballplayers were clean shaven. By 1914 only one MLB player--Wally Schang--had facial hair. For the next 58 years, there were no mustachioed players in MLB. In 1972 Reggie Jackson showed up for the Oakland A's spring training camp with a mustache. A's owner Charlie Finley and manager Dick Williams both hated it. The more they insisted that Jackson shave it off, the more defiant he became. Finley then attempted some reverse psychology: He figured if he encouraged other A's players to grow mustaches, Jackson's sense of individuality would be defeated and he'd voluntarily shave his mustache. The plan backfired. After several players starting growing mustaches, Finley started to like the new look of his team and the publicity that came with it. He completely switched gears and offered a $300 bonus to anyone who had grown a mustache by Father's Day. In fact, Finley began pressuring his players to have mustaches. To a man, everyone on the A's roster agreed--including ultra-conservative manager Williams. The A’s long-haired, mustachioed look would stamp them with an identity starkly different from the rest of Major League Baseball. Relief pitcher Rollie Fingers (shown here) became the most noteworthy Oakland player with a mustache. His agreement to sport stylish facial hair was included in his contract--along with a $100 annual stipend for mustache wax.
Tags: baseball  Oakland  A 
Added: 27th July 2011
Views: 7607
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Posted By: Lava1964

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