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Do YOU Have Nervous BO so that's what causes road rage! running out of your lifebuoy! LOL
Tags: ad  lifebuoy  soap 
Added: 6th July 2007
Views: 1881
Rating:
Posted By: Marie
Louella Parsons on Judy Garland i wish Louella Parsons "GOOD NEWS" from a 1949 MODERN SCREEN magazine had indeed been correct . . . she died twenty years later of an accidental overdose of barbiturates. . " WHAT IS really the matter with Judy Garland? That is the question hurled at me everywhere I go. All right, let's get at it. Judy is a nervous and frail little girl who suffers from a sensitiveness almost bordering on neurosis. It is her particular temperament to be either walking in the clouds with excitement or way down in the dumps with worry. The least thing to go wrong leaves her sleepless and shattered. She has never learned the philosophy of "taking it easy." Last year, when she was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she got in the habit of taking sleeping pills -- too many of them -- to get the rest she had to have. I'm not revealing any secrets telling you that. It was printed at the time. But for a highly emotional and highly strung girl to completely abandon sedatives, as Judy attempted to do when she realized she was taking too many, puts a terrific strain on the nervous system. The trouble is, Judy does not take enough time to rest. The minute she starts feeling better she wants to go back to work. She cried like a baby when she learned she was not strong enough to make The Barkleys of Broadway with Fred Astaire so soon following The Pirate and Easter Parade. "I'm missing the greatest role of my career," she sobbed. With Judy -- each role is always the greatest. Sometimes I believe Judy's frail little form is packed with too much talent for her own good. She is an artist, and I mean ARTIST, at too many things. She sings wonderfully and dances almost as well. And as for her acting -- well, listen to what Joseph Schenk, one of the really big men of our industry and head of 20th Century Fox (not Judy's studio) has to say. I sat next to Joe the night we saw Easter Parade. He told me, "Judy Garland is one of the great artists of the screen. She can do anything. I consider her as fine an actress as she is a musical comedy star. There is no drama I wouldn't trust her with. She could play such drama as Seventh Heaven as sensitively as a Janet Gaynor or a Helen Mencken." And I agree with every word Joe said. I am happy to tell you as I report the Hollywood news this month that Judy is coming along wonderfully, resting and getting back the bloom of health. Soon we will have her back on the screen -- her long battle with old Devil Nerves behind her and forgotten."
Tags: modern  screen  magazine  judy  garland  louella  parsons 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 2223
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
The Ghost and Mr Chicken This is the final nine minutes of my favorite Don Knotts movie: The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966). Knotts plays Luther Heggs, a nervous typesetter employed at a small-town newspaper. As a publicity stunt for his paper, he is cajoled into spending a night in a vacant mansion, rumored to be haunted, where a murder-suicide occurred 20 years before. Heggs reports all sorts of odd and blood-curdling goings-on. But when he tries to verify them, he cannot and is seemingly disgraced. This movie used to freak me out as a kid. My eight-year-old nephew won't watch it. The organ music is too scary for him.
Tags: Don  Knotts  Ghost  Mr  Chicken 
Added: 19th March 2009
Views: 2241
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Posted By: Lava1964
Mothers Little Helper Miles Laboratories was founded as the DR. MILES MEDICAL COMPANY in Elkhart, Indiana, in 1884 by Franklin Miles, a specialist in the treatment of eye and ear disorders, with an interest in the connection of the nervous system to overall health. By 1890, the sales success of his patent medicine tonic, DR. MILES' NERVINE, in treating "nervous" ailments (including "nervousness or nervous exhaustion, sleeplessness, hysteria, headache, neuralgia, backache, pain, epilepsy, spasms, fits, and St. Vitus' dance") led him to develop a mail order medicine business. Miles also published Medical News, a thinly disguised marketing vehicle for Nervine. Nervine remained on the market as a "calmative" until the late 1960s...
Tags: vintage  ad  dr.  miles  nervine  nerve  pills 
Added: 15th November 2007
Views: 1847
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Don Knotts Nervous Man Don Knotts frequently appeared in skits on The Steve Allen Show where he played "a nervous man" being interviewed. Here's an example.
Tags: Don  Knotts  nervous  man  Steve  Allen 
Added: 22nd May 2008
Views: 10144
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
NBA Shot Clock Invented 1954 It was the innovation that saved professional basketball: The 24-second shot clock. Coach Howard Hobson came up with with the idea of a shot clock, but it was first used in 1954 in Syracuse, New York. There Danny Biasone, the owner of the National Basketball Association's Syracuse Nationals, experimented with a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. He then convinced the NBA to adopt it. In the pre-shot clock days, the NBA had problems attracting fans and television coverage. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they took the lead. Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball in the front court endlessly without penalty. If the team in the lead chose to stall, the trailing team was forced to commit fouls to get the ball back following the free throw. Low-scoring, boring games with many fouls were common. The most extreme case occurred on November 22, 1950, when the Fort Wayne Pistons defeated the Minneapolis Lakers 19-18. A few weeks later, the Rochester Royals and Indianapolis Olympians played a soporific six-overtime game with only one shot in each overtime. The NBA tried several rule changes in the early 1950s to speed up the game and reduce fouls before eventually adopting Biasone's idea. How did Biasone arrive at the strange figure of 24 seconds? According to Biasone, 'I looked at the box scores from games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes--2,880 seconds--and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot.' When the shot clock first came into vogue, it made players so nervous that it hardly came into play; players were generally taking fewer than 20 seconds to shoot. According to Syracuse player Dolph Schayes, 'We thought we had to take quick shots. But as time went on, we saw the inherent genius in Danny's 24 seconds. You could work the ball around for a good shot.'
Tags: NBA  shot  clock 
Added: 15th November 2009
Views: 3190
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 2622
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Posted By: Lava1964
Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 3781
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1960 World Series Kinescope Found In September 2010, baseball fans were thrilled by a remarkable dicovery: A complete kinescope copy of the seventh game of the 1960 World Series was found in Bing Crosby's wine cellar! How a near pristine black-and-white reel of the entire television broadcast of the deciding game of the 1960 World Series — long believed to be lost forever — came to rest in the wine cellar of Bing Crosby’s home near San Francisco is not a mystery to those who knew him. Crosby loved baseball, but as a part owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates he was too nervous to watch the World Series against the New York Yankees, so he and his wife went to Paris, where they listened by radio. “He said, ‘I can’t stay in the country,’ ” his widow, Kathryn Crosby, recalled. “ ‘I’ll jinx everybody.’ ” He knew he would want to watch the game later — if his Pirates won — so he hired a company to record Game Seven by kinescope, an early relative of the DVR, filming off a television monitor. The five-reel set is the only known complete copy of the game, in which Pirates second baseman Bill Mazeroski famously hit a game-ending home run to beat the Yankees 10-9 at Forbes Field. It is considered one of the greatest and most memorable ballgames ever played. Crosby apparently had more foresight than the television networks and stations, which sadly erased or discarded nearly all the Major League Baseball games they carried until the 1970s. A canny preservationist of all things, Crosby, who died in 1977, kept a half-century’s worth of records, tapes and films in the wine cellar-turned-vault in his Hillsborough, California home. “Bing Crosby was way ahead of his time,” said Nick Trotta, senior library and licensing manager for Major League Baseball Productions, the sport’s archivist. The kinescope was found quite by accident. A producer searching through Crosby's estate for material for a TV documentary on the late singer's career accidentally came upon five film cannisters marked '1960 World Series.' The 50-year-old game was first shown to a private audience in Pittsburgh that included surviving members of both teams. It was broadcast on the MLB Network in December 2010 and has since been made available to the general public on DVD.
Tags: 1960  World  Series  baseball  Bing  Crosby 
Added: 13th August 2011
Views: 1614
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Posted By: Lava1964
NFL Announcerless Telecast - 1980 "We are just moments away from the kickoff of today's Jets-Dolphins game and a telecast that figures to be different. The fact that we try something different--and dare to--has been greeted with almost every kind of reaction, from good-natured humor to applause to some surprising anger." That's how NBC's Bryant Gumbel's introduced what was about to happen on Saturday, December 20, 1980: NBC was going to broadcast an entire NFL game from Miami's Orange Bowl with neither a play-by-play announcer nor an analyst. It was a meaningless, season-ending game for two mediocre NFL teams, but Don Ohlmeyer (pictured here) turned it into a happening. Ohlmeyer was the first producer of Monday Night Football. He produced and directed three Olympics, won 16 Emmy awards, and is a member of the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame. Based on his years of experience, Ohlmeyer always believed that sports announcers talked too much. Here was an attention-seeking vehicle that would drive that point home. Ohlmeyer also thought the gimmick might be a way to boost ratings points out of an otherwise unattractive matchup. Dick Enberg, who was one of NBC's lead football announcers at the time, was not amused. He was worried. "My first reaction was of incredible nervousness," he recalled. "We're paid to talk, so all of us want to fill the air with lots of exciting words. We all gathered together, hoping that Ohlmeyer was dead wrong. I mean, he was flirting with the rest of our lives. What if this crazy idea really worked?" The game, won by the New York Jets 24-17, featured only sounds that could be picked up by on-field microphones, the referee's calls, plus the usual announcements from the Orange Bowl's stadium announcer. To compensate for the absence of TV announcers, NBC went overboard on its graphics and pre-recorded soundbites of players and coaches. It was a onetime experiment that was largely mocked by TV critics. Surprisingly, though, comments received at NBC's switchboard were about 60% favorable.
Tags: NFL  NBC  announcerless  telecast  Don  Ohlmeyer 
Added: 30th August 2011
Views: 1563
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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