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Louella Parsons on Judy Garland i wish Louella Parsons "GOOD NEWS" from a 1949 MODERN SCREEN magazine had indeed been correct . . . she died twenty years later of an accidental overdose of barbiturates. . " WHAT IS really the matter with Judy Garland? That is the question hurled at me everywhere I go. All right, let's get at it. Judy is a nervous and frail little girl who suffers from a sensitiveness almost bordering on neurosis. It is her particular temperament to be either walking in the clouds with excitement or way down in the dumps with worry. The least thing to go wrong leaves her sleepless and shattered. She has never learned the philosophy of "taking it easy." Last year, when she was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she got in the habit of taking sleeping pills -- too many of them -- to get the rest she had to have. I'm not revealing any secrets telling you that. It was printed at the time. But for a highly emotional and highly strung girl to completely abandon sedatives, as Judy attempted to do when she realized she was taking too many, puts a terrific strain on the nervous system. The trouble is, Judy does not take enough time to rest. The minute she starts feeling better she wants to go back to work. She cried like a baby when she learned she was not strong enough to make The Barkleys of Broadway with Fred Astaire so soon following The Pirate and Easter Parade. "I'm missing the greatest role of my career," she sobbed. With Judy -- each role is always the greatest. Sometimes I believe Judy's frail little form is packed with too much talent for her own good. She is an artist, and I mean ARTIST, at too many things. She sings wonderfully and dances almost as well. And as for her acting -- well, listen to what Joseph Schenk, one of the really big men of our industry and head of 20th Century Fox (not Judy's studio) has to say. I sat next to Joe the night we saw Easter Parade. He told me, "Judy Garland is one of the great artists of the screen. She can do anything. I consider her as fine an actress as she is a musical comedy star. There is no drama I wouldn't trust her with. She could play such drama as Seventh Heaven as sensitively as a Janet Gaynor or a Helen Mencken." And I agree with every word Joe said. I am happy to tell you as I report the Hollywood news this month that Judy is coming along wonderfully, resting and getting back the bloom of health. Soon we will have her back on the screen -- her long battle with old Devil Nerves behind her and forgotten."
Tags: modern  screen  magazine  judy  garland  louella  parsons 
Added: 6th September 2007
Views: 2028
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Posted By: Teresa
My Favorite Car was My First Car  In 1965 when I graduated high school my dad FINALLY let me get my driver's license so I could get a car and a job. Of course he went with me because he was going to make the down payment, so I had to really talk him into the car I wanted, as it was a 1963 fire engine red Dodge Dart GT ragtop. It was gorgeous, at least to me. My dad wasn't really crazy about it, because he said it had probably been owned by some teenager who drag raced it all the time, but hey, that was my dad. He did agree after a little whining, and I drove it out of the lot straight to my best friend's house! I was so excited, my first car, and it looked like something I had only dreamed of owning. He had wanted me to get a Metropolitan, because he said they were safer. Ugh. I had such good times in this car, going down the road with the radio blasting out the Beatles, at 100 mph. I drove it to my first job, I still remember heading home on the Interstate late at night, in the dead of a Florida winter (50 degrees), with the top down and the heat on full blast. A few months later I met Larry, he kept my car one day while I was at work and had the nerve to take off the white twin racing stripes I had put on the hood and the trunk. I was crushed! And my dad made it worse by thanking him for doing it!! So my car made it through our first born in 1966 and then I had to part with her when she began having oil problems. But I will always miss my little Dodge Dart.
Tags: 1963  dodge  dart  gt  convertible 
Added: 6th October 2007
Views: 1410
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Posted By: Naomi
Gene Pitney 24 Hours From Tulsa Gene Pitney passed away last April, 2006, of natural causes, he was 65, but he left a legacy of hits going back to the early 60's and had been touring for the last 40 years. His songs have been recorded by some of the world's biggest stars, Hello Mary Lou was released by Rick Nelson, Roy Orbison recorded Today's Teardrops as the B-side to his million-selling single, Blue Angel. He is also credited with helping the Rolling Stones break into the American market with his endorsement of the band. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards wrote his hit That Girl Belongs to Yesterday which became the Stones duo's first composition to reach the American charts. Gene once recalled how his first solo performance at school degenerated into an embarrassing whimper as he was petrified by the expectant audience. Overcoming his nerves over the next few years, Pitney learned to play the guitar and piano and formed a schoolboy band. It was during one of their gigs that his distinctive voice was discovered by the proverbial "fat man with a cigar" who took him off to New York, and the rest was history.
Tags: gene  pitney  twenty  four  hours  from  tulsa  60s  singers 
Added: 4th November 2007
Views: 1809
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Posted By: Sophia
Mothers Little Helper Miles Laboratories was founded as the DR. MILES MEDICAL COMPANY in Elkhart, Indiana, in 1884 by Franklin Miles, a specialist in the treatment of eye and ear disorders, with an interest in the connection of the nervous system to overall health. By 1890, the sales success of his patent medicine tonic, DR. MILES' NERVINE, in treating "nervous" ailments (including "nervousness or nervous exhaustion, sleeplessness, hysteria, headache, neuralgia, backache, pain, epilepsy, spasms, fits, and St. Vitus' dance") led him to develop a mail order medicine business. Miles also published Medical News, a thinly disguised marketing vehicle for Nervine. Nervine remained on the market as a "calmative" until the late 1960s...
Tags: vintage  ad  dr.  miles  nervine  nerve  pills 
Added: 15th November 2007
Views: 1692
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Posted By: Teresa
Buster Brown Shoes oh, i have a HORRIBLE story to share with you about Buster Browns!! YEA, HUH? When my Dad was little, his Uncle gave him a little goat . . (that's the good part) they were very poor and it was time for Dad to get a new outfit. They didn't have any money, so HIS MOTHER sold the goat unbeknownst to my Dad . . Daddy came home with this incredibly uncomfortable Buster Brown outfit . . and THEN couldn't find his little knot-headed buddy!! Of all the nerve!! Bothered him all his life . . So one year for Christmas, i got him a life-sized carved goat that a 'fellow' whittled out of wood, and i put it outside the picture window at my parent's house with a big red bow on it. On Christmas morning when my sister and I got down there (now in our 40's) and we had opened all our presents, i went and opened the curtains . .TA DA!! Dad was THRILLED . .Mom is STILL mad because it's an eye sore!! LOL
Tags: ad  Buster  Brown 
Added: 19th November 2007
Views: 1373
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Posted By: Teresa
The Fridge William Perry Former Chicago Bears defensive lineman William “The Refrigerator” Perry remains hospitalized in South Carolina. Aiken Regional Medical Center spokeswoman Melissa Summer said Wednesday that Perry is in serious condition. The 46-year-old Perry has been hospitalized to deal with complications from Guillain-Barre (gee-LAN’ bah-RAY’) Syndrome, a chronic inflammation disorder of the peripheral nerves. Perry’s nephew, Purnell Perry, said Tuesday that his uncle was admitted more than a week ago but was expected to recover. A man who answered the phone Wednesday at Purnell Perry’s home in Aiken said he couldn’t comment on the football player’s hospitalization. The 300-pound plus defensive tackle played for the Bears’ 1985 Super Bowl team, and helped lead Clemson to the 1981 national championship.
Tags: The  Fridge  William  Perry  Chicago  Bears      fridge    refrigerator    william    perry    south    carolina    clemson    superbowl    20    XX    football    bears    patriots    walter    payton     
Added: 22nd April 2009
Views: 6049
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Posted By: Old Fart
Sputnik - A simple sound that scared America When the U.S.S.R. launched the first satellite in 1957, Sputnik, this lone sound of its telemetry was frightening to the many Americans. What have the Russians done? I can remember be unnerved listening to it, at age four. As I lay in bed I tried to picture it and guess where it was at that moment. This simple sound acted as a catalyst for our fledgling space program.
Tags: sputnik    50 
Added: 2nd September 2009
Views: 1404
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Posted By: Watersnake
Mysterious Life of Rudolf Hess One of the strangest stories of the Second World War was the bizarre flight of Rudolf Hess, Adolf Hitler's deputy, who unexpectedly parachuted into Scotland on May 10, 1941 on a mysterious mission, apparently undertaken on his own. (This photo shows the wreckage of his plane.) The details of Hess' mission are still shrouded in mystery; the British government will not release its official documents until 2016. Historians tend to believe that Hess boldly 'dropped in' on Britain to negotiate a separate peace with the western Allies so Nazi Germany would not have to fight a two-front war. (Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union would begin six weeks later.) Hess was promptly captured by locals and imprisoned for the remainder of the war. An enraged Hitler ordered that Hess be shot on sight if he ever again set foot in Germany. The British believed Hess was mad. His initial behavior at the Nuremburg Trials in 1946 seems to confirm this: Hess constantly counted on his fingers and laughed for no apparent reason. He claimed no knowledge of his days in Nazi Germany. His antics so unnerved fellow defendant Hermann Goring that Goring asked not to be seated beside Hess in the prisoners' box. Later in the tral, Hess' sanity seemed to return. Hess and six others were given life sentences, to be served in Spandau Prison in West Berlin. By 1966 the other six prisoners had been released. As Hess aged, the western Allies repeatedly asked for Hess to be released on humanitarian grounds. The Soviet Union always vetoed the request. Hess was the only prisoner at Spandau for 21 years until his curious death on August 17, 1987. He was found hanging in a garden house, strangled by an electrical wire. It was ruled a suicide. Family members doubted the accuracy of the report because by 1987 the 93-year-old Hess was so enfeebled that he could no longer tie his own shoes. Further conspiracy theories state that the man in Spandau Prison was not even Hess at all, but in fact a double. Spandau Prison was demolished after Hess' death so it would not become a shrine for Nazi sympathizers.
Tags: Nazi  Rudolf  Hess  mysteries 
Added: 14th December 2009
Views: 1260
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Posted By: Lava1964
Troubled Actress Gail Russell Gail Russell was a dark-eyed beauty who starred with some of the most popular leading men in Hollywood in the 1940s and 1950s, including John Wayne, Joel McCrae and Alan Ladd. Born in Chicago on September 21, 1924, Russell was a shy child and often hid beneath her parents' piano when they entertained. The family moved to Los Angeles when she was 14. Even though art was Russell’s passion, her mother convinced her to audition at Paramount Studios. Gail was offered a standard seven-year contract at $50 a week. Upon graduating from high school, she signed with Paramount. Russell suffered terribly from stage fright. She made her first film appearance at 19 in Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. The following year she appeared in Lady in the Dark. Although Russell’s role was minor, the film was nominated for three Oscars, which boosted her career. Russell's raven hair and enigmatic beauty was particularly suited to the ghost story plot of The Uninvited, her second film of 1944. During filming, Russell’s stage fright was so great that one of her co-stars suggested alcohol as a means to calm her nerves. Russell completed the film, but lost 20 pounds and later suffered a nervous breakdown. This film was also nominated for an Oscar, drawing even more attention to the young starlet. Russell played Emily Kimbrough in the 1944 comedy Our Hearts Were Young and Gay. The following year she starred as a schoolteacher opposite Alan Ladd in Salty O'Rouke, another Oscar-nominated film, then with Joel McCrae in the supernatural tale The Unseen. In 1946 she starred in Our Hearts Were Growing Up, a sequel with Diana Lynn. Before the year was over she completed yet another movie, The Bachelor’s Daughters, with Adolphe Menjou. Still, Russell continued to experience stage fright, liberally using alcohol to deal with it. In 1947, Russell performed one of her most famous roles as the innocent Quaker love of John Wayne in The Angel and the Badman. Rumors circulated that Russell and Wayne were having an affair, though they both denied anything more than friendship. In 1949, Russell once again starred as John Wayne's love interest in Wake of the Red Witch. When she learned that her husband had cast Russell in this role, John Wayne’s wife, actress Esperanza (Chata) Bauer, exploded in an alcoholic, jealous rage. When Wayne returned home late from the cast party, Bauer aimed a gun at her husband and pulled the trigger. The bullet barely missed Wayne’s head. Months later, Russell married her long-time boyfriend, television actor Guy Madison. In 1953, Russell was called to testify in John Wayne’s divorce trial and once again, Russell and Wayne both denied the affair. Two weeks later Russell was arrested for drunk driving, which fueled more rumors about an affair and caused serious damage to her marriage. Her alcoholic reputation so troubled Paramount executives they refused to renew her contract. Then Russell and Madison divorced, adding to her despair. In 1955, Russell left the scene of the crime after rear-ending another vehicle while intoxicated. In 1957 she drove her new convertible through the glass windows of Jan's Restaurant in Beverly Hills, pinning the janitor beneath her vehicle. Russell was picked up by Universal Studios and continued to star with some of the most famous names in Hollywood, including Randolph Scott. However, in August of 1957, when she failed to appear in court, officers were sent to her home and found her drunk and unconscious. The hearing was held at General Hospital where she was bedridden with severe effects from alcoholism. She joined Alcoholics Anonymous and stayed with this organization for a year, to no avail. In 1961, Russell starred in her last movie, The Silent Call. When filming was completed, she locked herself in her Los Angeles studio apartment, sketching and drinking. On August 27, 1961 Russell died from an alcohol-induced heart attack. She was just 36.
Tags: actress  Gail  Russell 
Added: 18th December 2010
Views: 3447
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Posted By: Lava1964
The New Treasure Hunt - 1974 Clip The New Treasure Hunt was a 1974-1977 syndicated remake of a 1956-1959 game show. The orginal show had a quiz segment. The 1970s version did not. Hosted by Geoff Edwards, it offered a fantastic grand prize of $25,000 to a contest who was lucky enough to choose the right box out of 30--and have the nerve to stick with it. Total Television describes the program as "slow moving and cruelly suspenseful." In this short clip from a 1974 episode, a contestant thinks she has made a bad bargain until Geoff surprises her.
Tags: New  Treasure  Hunt  Geoff  Edwards 
Added: 4th November 2012
Views: 1448
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Posted By: Lava1964

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