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Modern Times Poster 1936 Charlie Chaplin's last film as the Little Tramp--and the last major silent movie made in Hollywood--was Modern Times (1936). Here's a promotional poster for the film.
Tags: Modern  Times  poster  Charlie  Chaplin 
Added: 1st August 2010
Views: 1229
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
1903 World Series Scorecard In days gone by, all serious baseball fans used to manually keep a batter-by-batter record of ballgames on scorecards. (Some of us still do, although the custom appears to be dying out.) For the first modern World Series in 1903, the Third Base Saloon in Boston sold their own version to fans heading to the Huntington Avenue Base Ball Grounds to watch the American League champion Boston Pilgrims battle the National League champion Pittsburgh Pirates. Although the 10-cent price of this scorecard seems ridiculously cheap by today's standards, it was double the cost of what scorecards normally sold for at the ballpark during the regular season. However, it was five cents cheaper than the 15-cent pricetag the Pilgrims had affixed to the World Series scorecards sold by their vendors. The Boston Globe editorialized the hometown club was 'squeezing the dear public.'
Tags: World  Series  1903  scorecard 
Added: 30th October 2010
Views: 1238
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Posted By: Lava1964
1903 World Series Participants This is a rare, excellent quality photo of both the Boston Pilgrims and Pittsburgh Pirates taken before a game during the first modern World Series in 1903. The Pirates are standing at the back. Honus Wagner is standing at the far right. Cy Young is seated sixth from the left. Young struck out Wagner to record the final out of the last game. Boston beat Pittsburgh five games to three in the best-of-nine series.
Tags: baseball  World  Series  Boston  Pittsburgh 
Added: 9th January 2011
Views: 1029
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Posted By: Lava1964
Queen For A Day Total Television calls Queen For A Day, '...possibly the most maudlin game show ever broadcast'--and for good reason. Considered a forerunner of modern-day reality TV, QFAD was a successful radio program beginning in 1945 before airing on daytime television from 1956 through 1964. At the peak of the show's popularity in the late 1950s, NBC expanded it from 30 to 45 minutes to sell more commercials, at a then-premium rate of $4,000 per minute. QFAD opened with host Jack Bailey asking the largely female studio audience, 'Would YOU like to be queen for a day?' After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed. Each contestant talked about recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The sob stories were rated on an applause meter. Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. The interview climaxed with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes. The more pitiful the story a contestant had, the likelier the studio audience was to reach the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of Pomp and Circumstance, would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced. The prizes began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but might include a vacation, a night on the town with her husband or escort, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, and a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift. Bailey's trademark sign-off was 'This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen--for every single day!' A 1970 short-lived syndicated revival of QFAD quickly fell into disfavor with viewers when it was revealed the 'contestants' were actually actresses.
Tags: Queen  For  A  Day  reality  TV  game  show 
Added: 24th February 2011
Views: 1741
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Billy West - Chaplin Impersonator Billy West (September 22, 1892 - July 21, 1975) was an actor, producer, and director of the silent film era. He is best known as a terrific Charlie Chaplin impersonator. Born Roy B. Weissburg in Russia, West adopted his professional name some time after emigrating to America. He appeared in many short films, first in Apartment No. 13 in 1912. In 1917 movie theaters couldn't get enough Charlie Chaplin comedies, and an enterprising producer hired West, who had been doing comic pantomimes on the vaudeville stage, to make imitation-Chaplin subjects to meet the demand. West, wearing the identical tramp costume and makeup, copied Chaplin's movements and gestures so accurately that modern audiences often mistake West for the genuine performer. Chaplin himself saw the Billy West company filming on a Hollywood street, and allegedly told West, 'You're a damned good imitator.' Some West comedies were later deceitfully re-released on the home-movie market as 'Charlie Chaplin' pictures. Most of the West comedies of 1917-18 resembled the Chaplin comedies of 1916-17, with Oliver Hardy approximating the villainy of Eric Campbell, and Leatrice Joy in the Edna Purviance ingenue role.
Tags: silent  films  Billy  west  Chaplin  impersonator 
Added: 7th July 2011
Views: 1602
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Posted By: Lava1964
1896 Five-Dollar Silver Certificate Controversy A new series of $1, $2 and $5 banknotes were printed by the U.S. government in 1896. Known to collectors as the "educational series," the banknotes used classical art motifs to promote advancements in science. For example, the $5 silver certificate's design (shown below) highlighted the new importance that electricity brought to modern society. However, the naked breasts on the female figures sent some prudish folks into a tizzy. Some merchants and bankers in Boston considered the $5 bills to be obscene and refused to accept them--thus creating the term 'banned in Boston.' Despite the controversy, many banknote collectors consider the 1896 series to be the most beautiful ever produced by the U.S. government.
Tags: 1896  banknotes  numismatics  controversy 
Added: 17th July 2011
Views: 3384
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dance Cards Here was a quaint custom that has sadly disappeared: Dance cards. A dance card was commonly used by a young woman to record the names of the gentlemen with whom she intended to dance each successive dance at a formal ball. They appear to have originated in 18th century, but their use first became widespread in 19th century Vienna. Typically a card would list of all the dances for the evening and their style: for example, waltz, polka, or quadrille. Opposite each dance was a space to record the name of the scheduled partner for that dance. After the event ended, the card was frequently kept by the young lady as a souvenir of the evening. Typically, it would have a cover indicating the date and sponsoring organization of the ball and a decorative cord by which it could be attached to a lady's wrist or ball gown. From the 19th century until the First World War, dance cards for the elite of Austria-Hungary were often very elaborate, with some even incorporating precious metals and jewels. In modern times the expression "dance card" is often used metaphorically, as when someone says "pencil me into your dance card," meaning "find some time to spend with me". Conversely, someone's "dance card is full" implies that even though they may be interested, they have no time for another person.
Tags: dance  cards 
Added: 3rd September 2011
Views: 2700
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Posted By: Lava1964
26-Inning MLB Game - 1920 The longest game (by innings) in Major League Baseball's long history was a 26-inning, 1-1 tie. It was a National League game between the Boston Braves and Brooklyn Robins played at Braves Field in Boston on May 1, 1920. Amazingly, both starting pitchers--Brooklyn's Leon Cadore and Boston's Joe Oeschger--went the distance. Since night baseball didn't begin in MLB until 1935, the game was stopped by plate umpire Barry McCormick due to impending darkness. It had to be replayed in its entirety, but all the stats from the 26-inning tie counted. Remarkably, by modern standards, the game took only 3 hours and 50 minutes to play. It had started at 3:00 p.m., as was the custom in those days, and ended at 6:50 p.m. Several players unsuccessfully lobbied umpire McCormick to extend the game one more inning so they could say they played the equivalent of three nine-inning games. The press box at Braves Field did not have electric lights so reporters and telegraphers had to submit their accounts of the record-setting game using candlelight. Some trivia from the game: The score had been tied 1-1 since the sixth inning. The attendance was about 3,500. Cadore faced 95 Boston batters. Oeschger pitched to a mere 90 Robins, but his 21 consecutive scoreless innings established a record. Braves' first baseman Walter Holke recorded the ridiculous total of 43 putouts. Boston's second baseman, Charlie Pick, set a record too, but not a positive one: His one-game total of 11 official at-bats without a hit has never been matched. Years later Cadore remembered the aftereffects of the game. "My arm stiffened. I couldn't raise it to comb my hair for three days," he said. "After seven days of rest I was back taking my regular turn. I never had a sore arm before or after the game. I suppose the nervous energy of trying to win the game gave me the strength to keep me going."
Tags: baseball  MLB  longest  game  26  innings  Braves  Robins 
Added: 13th September 2011
Views: 3350
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Posted By: Lava1964
USS Maine Baseball Team The American battleship USS Maine mysteriously exploded in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898. About three-quarters of the ship's crew perished. Only 16 sailors onboard were completely uninjured. Accusations of sabotage led to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. (Evidence from modern investigations of the wreck suggests that a spontaneous internal explosion of coal near the ship's magazine likely caused the explosion--not sabotage.) Be that as it may, here is a photo of the USS Maine's baseball team. The man standing at the top left, J.H. Bloomer, was the only team member to survive the explosion.
Tags: USS  Maine  baseball  team 
Added: 18th September 2011
Views: 2032
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Posted By: Lava1964
1932 NFL Championship Game One of the most important games in the history of the National Football League was the 1932 NFL Championship Game. It provided many firsts: Most significantly it was the NFL's first championship game--and it was the first NFL game to be played indoors. Prior to 1933 there was no official league championship game. The league title went to the team with the best record--which was often disputed because teams did not play anything resembling a balanced schedule. In 1932, both the Chicago Bears and Portsmouth (OH) Spartans had six wins and a loss. By rule, tie games were ignored in the standings. Portsmouth had four ties and the Bears had six! During the regular season, both games between the Bears and Spartans had ended in ties. With the NFL's blessings, the Bears and Spartans agreed to play a one-game tie-breaker at Chicago's Wrigley Field on December 18. However, a forecast of a blizzard and minus-40-degree temperatures prompted the game to be moved indoors to Chicago Stadium, an arena more suited for hockey than football. Dirt from a recent circus was spread on the arena's concrete floor to form somethin akin to a regular gridiron. The cozy confines forced some playing rules to be revised. Because there were only 80 yards between the goal lines, as soon as a team advanced the ball beyond midfield, it was moved back 20 yards! The goalposts were moved from the endline to the goal line (where they stayed until 1974). Also, because the field was ten yards narrower than usual, before every play from scrimmage the ball was placed between hashmarks ten yards from the sideline. Chicago won the game 9-0, all their points coming in the fourth quarter on a controversial forward-pass touchdown and a safety. (The touchdown play caused the NFL's passing rules to be modernized the following season.) Not long afterward the Spartans moved to Detroit and became the Lions. The game was a huge success and inspired the NFL to split itself into two divisions and hold an annual championship game between the divisional champs. That system determined the NFL champion each year until the Super Bowl era began in 1966.
Tags: football  NFL  1932  Championship 
Added: 14th January 2012
Views: 2784
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Posted By: Lava1964

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