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First Goalie Mask - 1929 In 1929 Clint Benedict of the Montreal Maroons became the first goalie to wear a mask in a National Hockey League game. Benedict had suffered a broken nose in a previous game. To continue playing, Benedict commissioned a Boston leather goods company to make an experimental mask for him. The novelty didn't last very long--just one game. Benedict said the contraption obscured his view on low shots. New York Ranger goalie Charlie Rayner wore a partial mask for a few games in 1947 to protect a broken jaw, but he too complained of impaired vision and discarded it. Another dozen years would pass before NHL goalie Jacques Plante ushered in the modern goalie mask in 1959.
Tags: Clint  Benedict  goalie  mask 
Added: 15th August 2009
Views: 4420
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Posted By: Lava1964
Nanook of the North 1922 Robert J. Flaherty's Nanook of the North (1922) was the first feature length documentary film. It was shot in the Canadian arctic between August 1920 and March 1921. This highly acclaimed silent film was a world-wide box office hit. It showed an Inuk hunter and his family as they struggled to survive in the harsh conditions of the far north. Modern day documentarians tend to criticize Flaherty because many of the film's scenes sacrficed accuracy for dramatic effect. For example, Nanook and his fellow hunters are shown armed only with spears. In reality, by the 1920s the Inuk commonly hunted with firearms. Also 'Nanook' wasn't the central subject's real name and Nanook's 'wife' in the movie wasn't his wife at all.
Tags: Nanook  of  the  North 
Added: 3rd September 2009
Views: 1080
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Posted By: Lava1964
World Trade Center Public Opening Hours Film Tags: World  Trade  Center  Public  Opening  Hours  Film  Vintage    World    Trade    Center    NYC    Observation    Deck    New    York    Manhattan    Skyscraper    architecture    modernism    tourism    landmarks     
Added: 19th September 2009
Views: 1987
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Posted By: pfc
Wooden Tennis Rackets - 1925 This is a collection of the most popular styles of wooden tennis rackets that graced sporting goods stores circa 1925. They certainly have more 'character' than their modern-day counterparts.
Tags: wooden  tennis  rackets 
Added: 2nd October 2009
Views: 1150
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Cheater Boris Onischenko At the 1976 Montreal Olympics a scandal enveloped the modern pentathlon competition. It centered around the Soviet Union's team captain Boris Onischenko. Entering the fencing part of the event, Onischenko, a skilled swordsman who had won medals at both the 1968 and 1972 Olympics, was paired against British captain Jim Fox. Fox complained that something was amiss with Onischenko's epee. Officials seized it and determined it had an illegal grip. Onischenko was given another epee and the match continued with Onischenko winning easily. However, further examination of Onischenko's original weapon found it had been electronically altered to register phantom hits. The Soviet team was immediately disqualified. To their credit, the rest of the Soviet modern pentathlon team shunned Onischenko (whom the world media dubbed Dishonest-chenko) for his shenanigans. The Soviet men's volleyball team threatened to throw Onischenko from the highest window of the Olympic village if they encountered him.
Tags: fencing  Boris  Onischenko  cheater  Olympics 
Added: 29th October 2009
Views: 3165
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseball Hitting Famine 1968 This 1968 issue of Sports Illustrated discussed the 'hitting famine' in Major League Baseball. The offensive dearth reached its depths during the 1968 season, which baseball historians rightfully call 'the year of the pitcher.' That season Don Drysdale set a new record for consecutive shutout innings pitched. Bob Gibson's ERA was a ridiculous 1.12. Carl Yastrzemski won the American League batting title with a mere .301 average. The decline in offense can be traced back to 1962 when MLB allowed teams to raise the pitching mound beyond its rulebook height of 15 inches, if they so desired. (It was done as a knee-jerk reponse to the the big home run season of 1961.) However, the new height of the mound gave the pitchers a huge edge. The mound at Dodger Stadium was reputedly 20 inches high in the heyday of Sandy Koufax and Drysdale. The decline in offense adversely affected attendance. The hitting famine era ended when the pitcher's mound was reduced to its modern height of ten inches in 1969.
Tags: baseball  hitting  famine 
Added: 7th December 2009
Views: 1364
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing Day - Commonwealth Nations From Wiki: Boxing Day was traditionally a day on which the servants had a day off from their duties. Because of this the gentry would eat cold cuts and have a buffet-style feast prepared by the servants in advance. In modern times many families will still follow this tradition by eating a family-style buffet lunch, with cold cuts rather than a full cooked meal. It is a time for family, parlour games and sports in the UK. The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes were placed outside churches used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year on the day after Christmas. However, the exact etymology of the term "Boxing" is unclear, with several competing theories, none of which is definitively true. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800's, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. The establishment of Boxing Day as a defined public holiday under the legislation that created the UK's Bank Holidays started the separation of 'Boxing Day' from the 'Feast of St Stephen', and today it is almost entirely a secular holiday with a tradition of shopping and post-Christmas sales starting. We invite people who celebrate this holiday to contribute to the information here.
Tags: Boxing  Day  Commonwealth  Nations 
Added: 26th December 2009
Views: 1241
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Posted By: Admin
Three-Finger Baseball Glove They look strange to modern fans, but three-finger baseball gloves were commonly worn into the 1950s.
Tags: baseball  gloves 
Added: 16th January 2010
Views: 4876
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Posted By: Lava1964
Elvis Presley singsThe Flintstones Spoof What if Elvis Presley did TV Themes/Adverts like modern day music acts do?
Tags: Elvis  Presley  singsThe  Flintstones  Spoof 
Added: 23rd April 2010
Views: 2308
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Posted By: Cliffy
Lolita Controversy Vladimir Nabokov's novel Lolita deals with a middle-aged writer's sexual infatuation with a 12-year-old girl. Due to its shocking and risque subject matter, Nabokov was unable to find an American publisher for Lolita after finishing his manuscript in 1953. After four refusals, he finally resorted to Olympia Press in Paris in September 1955. (The photo below shows a copy of a first edition.) Although the first printing of 5,000 copies sold out quickly, there were no substantial reviews. However, at the end of 1955, Graham Greene, in an interview with the Times of London, called Lolita one of the best novels of 1955. This statement provoked a response from London's Sunday Express, whose editor called it 'the filthiest book I have ever read' and 'sheer unrestrained pornography.' British Customs officers were then instructed by a panicked Home Office to seize all copies entering the United Kingdom. In December 1956, the French followed suit and the Minister of the Interior banned Lolita. (The ban lasted for two years.) Its eventual British publication by Weidenfeld and Nicolson caused a scandal that contributed to the end of the political career of one of the publishers, Nigel Nicolson. In contrast, American officials were initially nervous, but the first American edition was issued without problems by G.P. Putnam's Sons in 1958, and was a bestseller--the first book since Gone with the Wind to sell 100,000 copies in the first three weeks of publication. Today Lolita is widely considered to be one of the finest novels of the 20th century. In 1998, it was named the fourth greatest English language novel of the 20th century by the Modern Library.
Tags: fiction  Lolita  publishing  controversy 
Added: 8th July 2010
Views: 3034
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Posted By: Lava1964

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