Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Brooke Shields Magazine Cover Ten-year-old Brooke Shields was the cover model on this issue of American Home magazine in 1975.
Tags: Brooke  shields  magazine 
Added: 25th January 2014
Views: 2047
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Fonz Tags: The  fonz  role  model  no  failed  marriages  no  drug  convictions  good  guy   
Added: 31st August 2009
Views: 1262
Rating:
Posted By: BigBoy Bob
Name the Model . . and actress . .
Tags: trivia 
Added: 7th September 2009
Views: 1941
Rating:
Posted By: Teresa
Traci Lords Scandal 1986 One of the more salacious scandals of the 1980s involved pornographic movie star Nora Louise Kuzma, better known to skin-flick aficionados as Traci Lords. In July 1986, during a comprehensive federal investigation into the pornography industry, authorities received an anonymous tip: Traci Lords, the hugely popular actress, had just turned 18 years old--meaning her meteoric two-year porn career had begun at the illegal and tender age of 16, perhaps even 15. It was true. Her mother's ex-boyfriend had provided Traci with a fake ID that added more than five years to Lords' age, giving her a November 1962 birthdate instead of May 1968. (Her physical attributes so belied her true age that Lords was also able to illegally obtain a California driver's license and a passport.) Mom's ex arranged some nude modelling gigs for Lords, including photos for Penthouse. Within a short time, Lords was Penthouse's Pet of the Month--an issue that outsold all others in the publication's history. She quickly graduated to hard-core films at a time when the home video market was exploding. Lords appeared in about 80 porn flicks and became enormously popular for her enthusiastic performances. 'I get paid for doing things I like,' Lords told an interviewer. Lords claims she only made 21 films (and earned about $35,000 for her services), but dozens of other movies were created from outtakes and reused footage. According to porn industry insiders, however, Lords was making six movies a month, demanding and getting $1,000 per day from producers (about twice the going rate for hard-core porn actresses at the time). Some sources claim Lords made over $1 million from her XXX-rated movies--and even had video companies give her $10,000 a month and provide her with a furnished apartment and a Mercedes. Before the scandal broke, her movies were outselling her nearest rival's by a 10:1 ratio. One film, 'Traci, I Love You,' was made in Europe a few days after her eighteenth birthday by her own newly formed production company, and is thus the only porno movie of hers that can be legally obtained or viewed in North America. Some of her 'banned' films are still available in Europe where laws and the age of sexual consent vary. (In France, for example, it is illegal for someone under the age of 18 to appear in a pornographic movie, but the film itself is not illegal.) The huge scandal resulted in more stringent age verification for porn participants that still exist today. Because of accusations that producers had lured Lords into the business knowing she was a minor, the entire adult film industry verged on collapse. However, Lords had also fooled the federal government with the same fake I.D. to get a U.S. passport, so prosecution efforts were halted. Suspicion lingers that it was Lords herself who tipped off authorities to her true age in order to increase her fame and eliminate her old films from the marketplace once she began her own production company. Lords, shown here in a 2008 photo, has pursued a career as a 'serious actress' since 1986. She has appeared in various films and TV sitcoms, usually typecast as 'the bad girl.'
Tags: Traci  Lords  scandal  underage  pornography 
Added: 30th September 2009
Views: 13023
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Loch Ness Monster Photo 1934 Although reports of a strange aquatic creature inhabiting Scotland's Loch Ness have been around since the seventh century A.D., the first purported photo of 'Nessie' did not appear until this image was published in the Daily Mail on April 21, 1934. It became known as the 'surgeon's photo' because the picture was sent to the newspaper by Dr. Robert Kenneth Wilson, a gynecologist, who insisted on anonymity. Sixty years later the photo was revealed to be a hoax. The image was created with a submerged toy submarine and a head and neck sculpted of plastic wood (a material commonly used in model construction). Sculptor Christian Spurling made the creation at the request of Marmaduke Wetherell, a big-game hunter who had been mocked by the Daily Mail. Wetherell used Dr. Wilson as a go-between to get the hoax published in the newspaper.
Tags: Loch  Ness  Monster  photo  hoax 
Added: 7th November 2009
Views: 2585
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bert Lahr For Lays Potato Chips Bert Lahr, the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard of Oz teaches the value of patience and setting a positive adult role model for a child or children.
Tags: Wizard  of  Oz  Lays  Potato  Chips  Bert  Lahr 
Added: 8th June 2010
Views: 6601
Rating:
Posted By: tbullock
1960s Paper Dresses Sixties Ford fashion model Colleen Corby models a paper dress on the cover of the May 1967 Seventeen magazine. More Colleen and sixties teen fashions can be seen at my site corbyfansDOTmultiplyDOTcom. Everyone is welcome to this visit down memory lane!
Tags: sixties  fashions 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 2763
Rating:
Posted By: AngoraSox
1960s model Colleen Corby Popular sixties teen fashion model Colleen Corby on the cover of a September 1964 Seventeen magazine. More vintage Seventeen magazines and more of Colleen Corby at my fansite corbyfansDOTmultiplyDOTcom All nostalgia seekers welcome!
Tags: 1960s  fashions 
Added: 18th June 2010
Views: 2843
Rating:
Posted By: AngoraSox
Adding Machine 1905 Adding machines have been around for more than a century, but the old-fashioned 'crank' models had pretty much disappeared from offices by the late 1980s. William S. Burroughs (1855-1898) invented an adding and listing machine with a full keyboard in the early 1880s. He submitted a patent application in 1885, co-founded the American Arithmometer Co. in 1886 to produce the machine, and received a patent for his invention in 1888. After its Bankers' and Merchants' Registering Accountant machine failed in trials in 1890, the American Arithmometer Co. marketed its improved Burroughs Registering Accountant in 1892 for $475. In 1905, the company was renamed the Burroughs Adding Machine Co. In 1894, an article in a bankers' publication-- clearly referring to the Burroughs Registering Accountant--reported that 'An ingenious adding machine, recently introduced in Providence banks, is said to be infallible in results, and to do the work of two or three active clerks. Inclosed in a frame with heavy plate-glass panels, through which the working of the mechanism can be seen, the machine occupies a space of 11 by 15 inches and is nine inches high. On an inclined keyboard are 81 keys, arranged in nine rows of nine keys each. The printing is done through an inked ribbon.' Shown here is a Burroughs model from 1905. A seat is provided for the user! How quaint!
Tags: adding  machine 
Added: 22nd June 2010
Views: 2150
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10 of 10 | Random