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1956 USSR-Hungary Water Polo Match At the 1956 Olympics in Melbourne, Australia, a water polo match between Hungary and the USSR turned into a blood bath--literally. The match, on December 6, was set against the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and saw Hungary defeat the USSR 4–0. The lasting image of the match was Hungarian star Ervin Zádor emerging from the pool with a large, bloody gash under his eye. He had been punched by Soviet player Valentin Prokopov. Tensions were already high between the Hungarian and Soviet water polo teams, as the Soviets had taken advantage of their political control of Hungary to study and copy the training methods and tactics of the 1952 Olympic champion Hungarians. On October 23, 1956, a demonstration by university students escalated into an uprising against the Soviet puppet government in Budapest. For a few days it appeared Hungary might free itself from the USSR's grasp. On November 1, however, Soviet tanks began rolling into Hungary. From November 4 to November 10 forces began suppressing the uprising with air strikes, artillery bombardments, and tank/infantry actions. The Hungarian water polo team was in a mountain training camp above Budapest. They were able to hear the gunfire and see smoke rising. With the Summer Olympics in Melbourne a month away, they were moved to Czechoslovakia to avoid being caught in the revolution. The players only learned the full extent of the uprising and the subsequent crackdown after arriving in Australia. By the start of the Olympics, the uprising had been suppressed. Many players saw the Olympics as a way to salvage national pride. "We felt we were playing not just for ourselves but for our whole country" said Zádor after the match. The "Blood In The Water" match was played in front of a partisan crowd bolstered with expatriate Hungarians as well as Australians and Americans who detested their Cold War Soviet rivals. Prior to the match, the Hungarians had evolved a strategy to taunt the Russians, whose language they had been forced to study in school. In the words of Zádor: "We had decided to try and make the Russians angry to distract them." From the opening whistle, kicks and punches were freely exchanged. At one point the Hungarian captain, Dezső Gyarmati, punched a Russian; it was caught on film. Meanwhile, Zádor scored two goals for the Hungarians, much to the delight of the crowd. With Hungary leading 4–0 in the final minutes, Zádor was marking Valentin Prokopov with whom he'd had verbal exchanges. Prokopov struck him, causing a gash to open. The blood comining with the water in the pool made it look like Zádor was bleeding to death. As he left the pool, his bleeding incited the crowd into a frenzy. Angry spectators jumped onto the concourse beside the water, shook their fists, shouted abuse, and spat at the Soviets. To avoid a riot, police entered the arena with one minute to go, declared the game over, and shepherded the crowd away. Pictures of Zádor's injuries were published around the world, leading to the "Blood in the Water" name, although reports that the water actually turned red were an exaggeration. Zádor said his only thought was whether he would be able to play the next match. Hungary went on to beat Yugoslavia 2–1 in the final to win their fourth Olympic gold medal. Zádor missed the match. After the event was completed, he and some of his teammates sought asylum in the West, rather than live in Hungary under a puppet pro-Soviet regime.
Tags: Olympics  water  polo  blood 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 3090
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kazakh National Anthem Gaffe At an international shooting competition in Kuwait in March 2012, a major error in protocol occurred: During the medal ceremony, the gold medal winner from Kazakhstan was serenaded on the podium with the bogus Kazakh anthem from the 2006 satirical film Borat rather than her country's true national anthem. Maria Dmitrienko remained calm while listening to lyrics from the made-up song that insults other countries and touts Kazakhstan's "clean prostitutes." The movie portrays Kazakhs as backward and degenerates. Nevertheless, Dmitrienko left the stage smiling, possibly realizing what had happened. Kazakhstan's shooting team understandably demanded an apology. Ilyas Omarov of Kazakhstan's foreign ministry called the error "a scandal" and promised to undertake an investigation. The event's organizers apparently downloaded the wrong song from the Internet--and also got the Serbian anthem wrong too. This isn't the first time Kazakhstan's national anthem was messed up. At a ski event in northern Kazakhstan earlier that same month, a bit of "Livin' La Vida Loca" by Ricky Martin was played briefly in error before the true anthem played.
Tags: protocol  error  Kazakh  anthem  Borat 
Added: 27th July 2012
Views: 1142
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jacqueline Gareau Victory Ceremony On Arpil 21, 1980, Jacqueline Gareau, 27, of Montreal competed in the prestgious Boston Marathon. Gareau took the lead amongst the female runners after seven miles. Accordingly, the television coverage focused on her until the controversial finish. Gareau was shocked to find another runner, Rosie Ruiz, had broken the tape ahead of her. Ruiz was disqualified after an investigation proved that she had started the race, vanished, and then re-entered the marathon course a few hundred meters from the finish line. Despite overwhelming evidence that she had cheated, Ruiz remained utterly defiant--to the point of refusing to return her medal. Gareau was awarded a medal a few days after the fact in a subdued ceremony. Twenty-five years later, at the 2005 Boston Marathon, the 52-year-old Gareau rightfully got her "moment of victory" denied to her in 1980 by Ruiz's cheating. Gareau was allowed to ceremonially break the tape, and was given a bigger medal than Ruiz had gotten in 1980.
Tags: Jacqueline  Gareau  marathon  winner  ceremony 
Added: 17th September 2012
Views: 2742
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Posted By: Lava1964
Sportswoman of the Year Mary Lou Retton, Height 4 ft 9 in (1.45 m), An American Gymnast! "Catapulted" to international fame by winning, the All Around Gold Medal in women's gymnastics at the 1984 Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles, California.
Tags: Mary  Lou  Retton,  1984,    Olympics,  gold  medalist,   
Added: 28th November 2012
Views: 1122
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Posted By: mia_bambina
Dong Dong wins Gold The winner of the gold medal in the men's trampoline event at the 2012 London Olympics was...Dong Dong! The Chinese athlete had captured a bronze medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Canadian broadcasters had fun with his, ahem, unusual name: One gleeflully stated "Dong Dong is on the tramp!"
Tags: olympics  trampoline  Dong  Dong 
Added: 13th December 2012
Views: 1253
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Posted By: Lava1964
George Foreman - Pro Boxing Debut George Foreman, the 1968 Olympic gold medallist and future world heavyweight champion, made his pro boxing debut at Madison Square Garden on June 23, 1969 versus an overmatched Don Waldhelm. Howard Cosell calls the one-sided match for ABC's Wide World of Sports.
Tags: boxing  George  Foreman  pro  debut 
Added: 9th December 2013
Views: 908
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Posted By: Lava1964
Leo Randolph - Forgotten Olympian The 1976 American Olympic boxing team won five gold medals, one silver, and one bronze. Four of the gold medallists eventually won professional world titles. Though largely forgotten today, Leo Randolph was one of them. Randolph, a resident of Tacoma, WA, won the flyweight division at the Montreal Olympics at age 18. (In the gold-medal match against Cuba's Ramon Duvalon, many boxing fans thought Randolph was the recipient of a generous decision.) Randolph waited nearly two years before turning professional. In the interim he finished high school and worked at a Boeing aircraft factory. Randolph's early pro opponents, in most cases, left a lot to be desired as there are few quality pro boxers in the lightest weight categories in North America. Nevertheless, Randolph beat Colombia's Ricardo Cardona for the WBA junior featherweight title on May 4, 1980 with a 15th-round knockout. However, in his first defense of his title just three months later, Randolph was totally outclassed by Sergio Palma of Argentina. The challenger battered Randolph and won the title with a sixth-round technical knockout. Saying his heart was no longer in boxing, Randolph collected his $72,000 purse and promptly retired after the bout at age 22, compiling a pro record of 17-2. In a 1996 "Where Are They Now?" feature in Sports Illustrated, Randolph was happily employed as a bus driver for Pierce Transit in the Pacific northwest.
Tags: boxing  Leo  Randolph  Olympics 
Added: 27th December 2012
Views: 700
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Posted By: Lava1964
Valour Road - Victoria Cross The Victoria Cross is the most difficult military medal in the world to win. A recipient must be a member of the military of a British Commonwealth country and must perform an extraordinary feat of valour in the presence of the enemy. The feat also has to be witnessed. The circumstances surrounding the feats of all potential receipients are thoroughly investigated before the award can be given. Since 1856 there have been 94 Canadians who have won the VC. Against all odds, three recipients from the First World War all lived on Pine Street in Winnipeg. This Canadian Heritage Minute gives a hint of what they did.
Tags: Victoria  Cross  Winnipeg  Pine  Street  Valour  Road 
Added: 30th January 2013
Views: 667
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Posted By: Lava1964
Joseph Kaeble - VC Winner Earlier I posted the brief Heritage Minute clip about the three Victoria Cross winners who all lived on Pine Street in Winnipeg. This is the story of another VC winner: 26-year-old Corporal Joseph Kaeble, who single-handedly repelled a German breakthrough on the Western Front in June 1918. Lake most VC winners, Corporal Kaeble got his medal posthumously.
Tags: Joseph  Kaeble  Victoria  Cross  winner 
Added: 30th January 2013
Views: 793
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Posted By: Lava1964
Muhammad Ali - Gold Medal Replaced For years Muhammad Ali claimed he'd tossed his gold medal from the 1960 Rome Olympics into the Ohio River in a fit of anger after experiencing racial discrimination in his hometown of Louisville, KY. By the early 1990s, Ali admitted the story was a fabrication and that his gold medal had simply been misplaced. This clip is from the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta. IOC head Juan Antonio Samaranch gave Ali a replacement medal in a special ceremony at halftime of the men's basketball final.
Tags: Muhammad  Ali  Olympics  gold  medal  replaced 
Added: 4th February 2013
Views: 807
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Posted By: Lava1964

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