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1912 British Olympic Womens Swim Team These four swimmers represented Great Britain at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm. They won the gold medal in the 4 x 100 relay. My research says they are Belle Moore, Jennie Fletcher, Annie Speirs, and Irene Steer, although I don't know which one is which. (I don't know who the dour lady in the middle is. A chaperon or coach, perhaps? She looks like a million laughs.) Women's swimming made its debut in these 1912 Olympics. The British team's winning time was five minutes, 52.8 seconds. By comparison, the gold-medal-winning time of the Australian team at the 2008 Beijing Olympics was three minutes, 52.69 seconds--more than two full minutes ahead of the 1912 pace. The entire 1912 Olympic swimming program was contested in just one day.
Tags: Olympics  swimming  British  women 
Added: 21st September 2010
Views: 3585
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rare 1913 Liberty Head Nickel In 1913, the Indian Head nickel (commonly known as the buffalo nickel) was introduced, replacing the Liberty Head design that had been used since 1883. These were the first official strikings of nickels in 1913; the United States Mint's official records show no Liberty Head nickels were produced that year. Yet five Liberty Head nickels dated 1913 came to the attention of the numismatic community in 1920. All five were in the possession of Samuel Brown, a coin collector who attended the American Numismatic Association's annual convention and displayed the coins there. Brown had previously placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 seeking information on these coins and offering to pay $500 for each. Ostensibly, the coins had been purchased as a result of this offer. However, Brown had been a Mint employee in 1913, so many numismatic historians have concluded that he illegally struck the coins himself and then removed them from the Mint. Other numismatic authorities, however, note there are several methods by which the coins could have been legitimately produced. For instance, they may have been lawfully issued by the Mint's Medal Department 'for cabinet purposes,' or they could be trial pieces struck in late 1912 to test the following year's new coinage dies. In January 1924 Brown sold all five 1913 Liberty Head nickels. The intact lot passed through the hands of several other coin dealers before finally being purchased by Colonel E.H.R. Green. Green kept them in his collection until his death in 1936. When his estate was auctioned, all five of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels were purchased by two dealers, Eric P. Newman and B.G. Johnson. The dealers broke up the set for the first time. The fictional theft of one of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels (known as the Olsen specimen) was the focal point of a December 1973 episode of the popular police drama Hawaii Five-0. It was titled 'The $100,000 Nickel' (which indeed was the value of the coin at the time). Rumors of the existence of a sixth 1913 Liberty Head nickel occasionaly circulate. If one did surface in perfect condition, numismatic experts estimate it could command $20 million at auction. You might want to check your piggy bank...
Tags: numismatics  1913  nickel  rare 
Added: 20th May 2011
Views: 1370
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Posted By: Lava1964
1963 Teens In The News What? Look at that skinny kid named Steve Spielberg. If only he had tried a little harder he could have made something of himself. LOL And we all know that 16-year-old pianist Andre Watts made musical history right out the gate! Amazingly, 14-year-old Francine Fox earned an Olympic silver medal one year later in Women's Kayak Doubles! At the 1964 Olympic Summer games in Tokyo, Francine Fox and Gloria Perrier paddled to a silver medal, trailing a German pair by two seconds. The pairing was interesting for the disparity in ages, as, in 1964, Fox was a 15-year-old high school student, while Perrier was 20 years older. I couldn't find the other teen in the news singer Nancy Hawk in Google, but these vintage Seventeen magazines have lots of fun surprises to offer!
Tags: 1963  SeventeenMagazine  SteveSpielberg  film  movies  Hollywood  AndreWatts  music  FrancineFox  sports  Olympics  teenagers  NancyHawk  MilitaryDefenseDept 
Added: 13th July 2011
Views: 1831
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Posted By: AngoraSox
Speed Skating champ promotes smoking In this dated ad from 1935, Jack Shea, a double gold medallist in speed skating at the 1932 Lake Placid Winter Olympics, says that Camel cigarettes restore his pep.
Tags: Jack  Shea  speed  skater  cigarette  ad 
Added: 3rd September 2011
Views: 1029
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympian Anthony Hembrick Misses Bus During the mid-1980s, Detroit's Anthony Hembrick, a member of the U.S. Army, was a three-time American amateur middleweight boxing champion. He was perceived to be a medal hopeful when he arrived at the 1988 Seoul Olympics. However, Hembrick never got the chance to show his stuff because he never got the opportunity to fight there. Hembrick and his coach, Ken Adams, were misinformed about the time of Hembrick's first-round match and missed catching a bus from the Olympic Village that would have gotten him to the boxing venue in ample time. By the time Hembrick and Adams arrived at Chamshil Students' Gymnasium, Hembrick had been disqualified and the match was awarded to South Korean Ha Jong-Ho. The 1988 Olympic boxing tournament was replete with odd incidents and controversies. Anti-American sentiment among the host South Koreans was widespread. Some conspiracy-minded people believe Hembrick was deliberately misled about the time of his match so the South Korean boxer would win by walkover. Hembrick later embarked on a pro boxing career, usually at light heavyweight, that was largely disappointing. He was often introduced before his bouts as "the man who missed the bus."
Tags: Anthony  Hembrick  Olympic  boxing  disqualified 
Added: 2nd November 2011
Views: 1476
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Posted By: Lava1964
Weightlifter Vasili Alexeyev 1942-2011 It has been reported that Vasili Alexeyev, the Soviet weightlifter who utterly dominated the super-heavyweight division of the sport during most of the 1970s, died in Germany on November 25, 2011 at the age of 69. He was at a clinic seeking treatment for a serious heart ailment. Alexeyev easily won gold medals at both the 1972 and 1976 Olympics and won eight straight world championships from 1970 to 1977. (The Olympics doubled as weightlifting's world championships in 1972 and 1976.) Alexeyev, who set 80 world records in his career, was listed as a "mining engineer" by Soviet sports authorities. Alexeyev was the first man to lift 500 pounds in competition. But his fans were fickle: When the 38-year-old Alexeyev failed to make any of his three lifts at the 1980 Moscow Olympics, he was jeered off the stage. In a 1971 interview, the affable Alexeyev said he liked to spend his spare time reading Agatha Christie mystery novels.
Tags: weightlifting  Vasili  Alexeyev 
Added: 28th November 2011
Views: 4262
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Sprinter Wilma Rudolph Twenty-year-old American sprinter Wilma Rudolph won three gold medals at the 1960 Rome Olympics. Her championships came in the women's 100 metres, 200 metres, and 4 x 100 relay. Rudolph had also been a member of the 1956 U.S. Olympic team in Melbourne as a 16-year-old. Remarkably, Rudolph was a sickly child who had to walk with the assistance of leg braces. Another member of the 1960 U.S. Olympic team was admittedly smitten by Rudolph: an 18-year-old boxer from Louisville named Cassius Clay. Clay/Ali and Rudolph became friends and often appeared at charity fund-raisers together for many years afterwards. Rudolph only lived to be 54, dying of brain cancer in 1994.
Tags: Wilma  Rudolph  sprinter  Olympics 
Added: 18th January 2012
Views: 3295
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Posted By: Lava1964
Jill Kinmont 1936-2012 Jill Kinmont Boothe (February 16, 1936 February 9, 2012) was a former alpine ski racer who competed in the mid-1950s. Jill Kinmont grew up in Bishop, California, skiing and racing at Mammoth Mountain. In early 1955, she was the reigning U.S. national champion in the slalom, and a top prospect for a medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina, Italy. While competing in the downhill at the Snow Cup in Alta, Utah on January 30, 1955, she suffered a near-fatal accident which resulted in paralysis from the neck down. It ironically occurred the same week that Kinmont, about two weeks shy of her 19th birthday, was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated dated January 31, 1955. After her rehabilitation, she went on to graduate from UCLA with a B.A. in German and earned a teaching credentials from the University of Washington. She had a long career as an educator first in Washington and then in Beverly Hills, California. She taught special education at Bishop Union Elementary School from 1975 to 1996 in her hometown of Bishop. She was an accomplished painter who had many exhibitions of her artwork. Kinmont was the subject of two movies: The Other Side of the Mountain in 1975, and The Other Side of the Mountain Part 2 in 1978. Both films starred Marilyn Hassett as Kinmont. Jill married trucker John Boothe in November 1976, and they made their home in Bishop until her death.
Tags: SI  jinx  Jill  Kinmont  skier 
Added: 13th February 2012
Views: 6581
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Posted By: Lava1964
Stella Walsh and Helen Stephens About four years ago I made a post about the gender controversy surrounding Stella Walsh, a Polish-born sprinter who competed at both the 1932 and 1936 Summer Olympics. Only after 'her' 1980 death was it discovered that Walsh was actually a male. Walsh's great rival at the 1936 Berlin Games was American Helen Stephens (shown on the left in this photo). Stephens passed her gender test and won the gold medal in the women's 100 meters.
Tags: gender  controversy  Helen  Stephens  Stella  Walsh 
Added: 15th May 2012
Views: 2075
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Posted By: Lava1964
Duane Bobick-John Tate 1979 Duane Bobick was an outstanding American amateur boxing hopeful in the early 1970s. Among his defeated opponents were future world heavyweight champion Larry Holmes and Cuba's superb Teofilo Stevenson. The favorite to win the gold medal at the 1972 Munich Olympics, Bobick was instead knocked out in the quarterfinals by Stevenson. Turning pro shortly thereafter, Bobick won his first 38 pro fights. Although the quality of many of Bobick's opponents was questionable, Bobick did defeat a handful of capable fighters such as Mike Weaver, Randy Neumann, Chuck Wepner and Scott LeDoux. NBC gave Bobick a prime-time fight versus Ken Norton on Wednesday, May 11, 1977 as a means of elevating him to a modern version of the "Great White Hope." With 42 million people watching, Norton dispatched Bobick inside of one round. (I posted that bout on this website several years ago.) After that debacle, Bobick recorded six wins and a loss to South African Kallie Koenetze, so ABC decided to give Bobick another shot at making it big. On February 17, 1979, Bobick was matched against John Tate, an American bronze medallist from 1976 (who had coincidentally also been knocked silly by Teofilo Stevenson) in a live feature bout from Indianapolis on Wide World of Sports. Surely Bobick would fare better this time, right?
Tags: Duane  Bobick  John  Tate  heavyweight  boxing 
Added: 10th December 2014
Views: 1014
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Posted By: Lava1964

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