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Rock n Rollen Rollen Frederick Stewart, also known as Rock 'n' Rollen and Rainbow Man, was a fixture in American sports culture for about a decade. He became famous for wearing a rainbow-colored afro-style wig and, later, for holding up signs reading "John 3:16" at sporting events around the United States and overseas in the 1970s and 1980s. Stewart, a born-again Christian, was determined to "get the message out" via television. He figured televised sporting events provided the best opportunities. Stewart would strategically position himself for key shots of plays or athletes. Stewart's first major appearance was at the 1977 NBA Finals where he seemed to constantly be on camera. By the time of the 1979 MLB All-Star Game, broadcasters were actively trying to avoid showing him. Undaunted, Stewart appeared behind NFL goalposts, near Olympic medal stands, and even at the Augusta National Golf Club. At the 1982 Indianapolis 500, he was behind the pits of race winner Gordon Johncock. Stewart's fame led to a Budweiser beer commercial and a Saturday Night Live parody sketch. Stewart was briefly jailed by Moscow police at the 1980 Summer Olympics for wearing a red, white, and blue afro wig. By the mid-1980s Stewart's began exhibiting irrational behavior. In the late 1980s, he began a string of stink bomb attacks. His targets included the Orange County Register, the Trinity Broadcasting Network, and a Christian bookstore. The stated intent of an attempted attack at the American Music Awards was to show the public that "God thinks this stinks." Stewart is currently serving three consecutive life sentences for a orchestrating a hostage-taking and attempted kidnapping at a California hotel in 1992. Reportedly, Stewart believed that the Rapture was due to arrive in six days. During the standoff, he threatened to shoot at airplanes taking off from nearby Los Angeles International Airport and covered his hotel room windows with "John 3:16" placards. His next parole hearing is in 2017.
Tags: Rollen  Stewart  Rock  n  Rollen 
Added: 17th February 2014
Views: 2195
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Posted By: Lava1964
Viktor Tikhonov - USSR Hockey Coach One of the most familiar faces of Soviet Union hockey was the dour puss of coach Viktor Tikhonov who ran the Central Red Army club team and the Soviet National team with an iron fist and almost unchecked success for 20 years. Tikhonov was born on June 4, 1930. As a player, Tikhonov was a defenceman with the Soviet Air Force and Dynamo Moscow clubs, but he wasn't well known internationally until he became the head coach of both the Central Red Army team and the Soviet Union's national team in 1977. At one point Red Army won 13 consecutive Soviet Elite League titles--which isn't all that surprising considering Tikhonov had the authority of a Red Army general and could immediately draft any player into the armed forces if he showed promise. The USSR won eight IIHF world titles under Tikhonov plus Olympic gold medals in 1984, 1988 and 1992. The USSR's national team also won the 1979 Challenge Cup and 1981 Canada Cup. Tikhonov had power over his players' lives and used it to control every aspect of his team. They routinely trained together for 50 weeks per year while living in army barracks. Canadian hockey great Phil Esposito said the so-called Soviet "amateurs" were more professional than NHL players. Humorless and ruthless, Tikhonov was known for his dictatorial coaching style. He exercised control over his players' lives. His expected absolute obedience--or else. His players quietly called him "the last Stalinist." With tongue-in-cheek humor, western media often referred to Tikhonov as "Chuckles." Tikhonov constantly feared his players would defect if they ever got the slightest chance. Anyone he merely suspected of defecting would be left off teams planning to travel outside the Iron Curtain. In 1991, for instance, he cut Pavel Bure, Valeri Zelepukin, Evgeny Davydov, and Vladimir Konstantinov just before the 1991 Canada Cup. All of them had been drafted by NHL teams, and Tikhonov suspected they were flight risks. Even after the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Tikhonov stayed on as the national team coach of Russia for a few more years, but the newer players rebelled against his harsh authoritarian ways. Tikhonov mellowed slighty before going into retirement in 1996. After his retirement, Tikhonov lobbied the Russian government for more attention and better financing for the national team. His grandson plays on the current Russian national squad. Tikhonov died in November 2014.
Tags: hockey  coach  USSR  Viktor  Tikhonov 
Added: 19th February 2014
Views: 642
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Cheater Boris Onischenko At the 1976 Montreal Olympics a scandal enveloped the modern pentathlon competition. It centered around the Soviet Union's team captain Boris Onischenko. Entering the fencing part of the event, Onischenko, a skilled swordsman who had won medals at both the 1968 and 1972 Olympics, was paired against British captain Jim Fox. Fox complained that something was amiss with Onischenko's epee. Officials seized it and determined it had an illegal grip. Onischenko was given another epee and the match continued with Onischenko winning easily. However, further examination of Onischenko's original weapon found it had been electronically altered to register phantom hits. The Soviet team was immediately disqualified. To their credit, the rest of the Soviet modern pentathlon team shunned Onischenko (whom the world media dubbed Dishonest-chenko) for his shenanigans. The Soviet men's volleyball team threatened to throw Onischenko from the highest window of the Olympic village if they encountered him.
Tags: fencing  Boris  Onischenko  cheater  Olympics 
Added: 29th October 2009
Views: 2549
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Posted By: Lava1964
Alex Haley Plagiarism Scandal 1978 In 1978, Alex Haley, the renowned author of Roots, came under fire in a plagiarism lawsuit launched by a white anthropologist and fellow author Harold Courlander. Haley claimed he had spent a decade researching his heritage for his historical novel, which in 1977 was adapted as a wildly successful TV miniseries. That same year he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and the Spingarn Medal for the book. A year later his reputation was forever marred. Courlander went to the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York to charge that Roots was substantially plagiarized from Courlander's own book, The African. Courlander's witnesses included Michael Wood an English professor at Columbia University and an expert on plagiarism. Wood opined in a report that the evidence of plagiarism in Roots was 'clear and irrefutable' and that the copying of passages was 'significant and extensive.' After a five-week trial in federal district court, Courlander and Haley settled the case, with Haley making a financial settlement of $650,000 and a statement that 'Alex Haley acknowledges and regrets that various materials from The African by Harold Courlander found their way into his book Roots.' Haley claimed the appropriation of Courlander's passages had been unintentional. Haley orginally maintained he had never heard of The African, much less read it. Shortly after the trial, however, Joseph Bruchac, an instructor of black literature at Skidmore College, came forward to swear in an affidavit that in 1970 or 1971--five or six years before the publication of Roots--he had discussed The African with Haley and had given his 'own personal copy of The African to Haley.' In a later interview with BBC Television, Judge Ward stated, 'Alex Haley perpetrated a hoax on the public.'
Tags: Roots  Alex  Haley  plagiarism  scandal 
Added: 4th February 2010
Views: 13034
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Posted By: Lava1964
Barbara Ann Scott Canada's Barabara Ann Scott is photographed doing a 'stag leap' in this photograph from December 1947. Two months later, at age 19, she would win the women's figure skating gold medal at the 1948 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland. At the opening ceremonies for the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, the 81-year-old Scott was one of the dignitaries who brought the Olympic flag into the stadium.
Tags: Barbara  Ann  Scott  figure  skater  Olympics 
Added: 18th February 2010
Views: 1467
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Posted By: Lava1964
1924 Canadian Olympic Hockey Team This is a photo of Canada's first Olympic hockey team. At the inaugural Winter Olympics in Chamonix, France in 1924, Canada sent a local amateur team (the Toronto Granites) to compete against the world's best. The results were horribly lopsided, to say the least: Playing three games in three days, Canada overwhelmed their Pool 'A' opponents. The Canadians thumped Czechoslovakia 30-0, Sweden 22-0, and Switzerland 33-0. In the medal round, Canada beat Great Britain 19-2 and the United States 6-1 to capture the gold medals. (Entering that final game, the Americans had outscored Belgium, France, Great Britain and Sweden by an aggregate score of 72-0.) Overall, Canada outscored its five opponents 110-3. Harry Watson scored 37 of Canada's goals. The Canadians' victory was so decisive that Canada was awarded an automatic bye into the final round at the next Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland in 1928. None of the Canadians ever played pro hockey.
Tags: hockey  Olympics  Canada 
Added: 4th March 2010
Views: 980
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Posted By: Lava1964
The Fosbury Flop At the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, American high jumper Dick Fosbury displayed a new way of clearing the bar--head first. The international media quickly dubbed the innovative maneuver The Fosbury Flop. Since Fosbury won the gold medal, his revolutionary new style undeniably had merit. It became routine among world-class high jumpers within a few years.
Tags: Dick  Fosbury  high  Jumper 
Added: 26th April 2010
Views: 1202
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olympic Lacrosse Lacrosse was an official medal sport in two Summer Olympics: 1904 and 1908. Canada won both 'tournaments' (if you can call them that). In 1904 at St. Louis there were only three teams competing. Two of them were Canadian. In 1908, the tourney in London consisted of one game between Canada and Great Britain. It was played more than three months after the other Olympic events had concluded! This photograph is from that game, won by Canada 14-10.
Tags: Olympic  lacrosse 
Added: 29th May 2010
Views: 747
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Posted By: Lava1964
Beatrix Schuba - Figure Skater Austria's Beatrix (Trixi) Schuba was singlehandedly responsible for changing the scoring rules of figure skating--because she was so boring. Schuba won the women's world championship in both 1971 and 1972 and the gold medal at the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. At the time 'compulsory figures' (also known as 'school figures') counted for a huge percentage of a skater's score and gave the sport its name. These consisted of skaters tracing patterns along the ice. Schuba was totally dominant at this aspect of her sport, but she was only a mediocre performer in the free skate. At the 1972 world championships in Calgary, Schuba had such a commanding lead after the compulsory figures that all she needed to do to win was show up for the free skate. That's basically what Schuba did. She came on the ice and skated only for a few seconds--but it was good enough for gold. The goings-on did not sit well with television audiences nor with the crowd in Calgary who felt Canada's Karen Magnussen, an excellent free skater, had been robbed of the gold medal. The next year FIS added a short program to the championships to reduce the importance of the compulsory figures. Schuba opted to retire. Compulsory figures were discontinued altogether in 1990.
Tags: Beatrix  Schuba  figure  skating 
Added: 6th June 2010
Views: 2766
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tennis Prodigy Jennifer Capriati Tennis prodigy Jennifer Capriati was just shy of her fourteenth birthday when she graced the cover of Sports Illustrated in 1990. Her father and one-time coach, Stefano, wanted Jennifer to turn pro at 13 but the WTA's rules would not allow for anyone to play in a professional event until the month of her fourteenth birthday. (Jennifer's birthday is March 29, 1976.) With much fanfare she reached the final of her first two pro tourneys and was ranked eighth in the world by the end of the year. She won a gold medal at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics and things looked totally promising. However, Capriati had a disappointing 1993. By 1994 she had been arrested for shoplifting a $35 ring and marijuana possession. To prevent further 'burn-out cases' among young players, the WTA instituted rules restricting the number of events players under 16 could enter. A Capriati comeback had moderate success, but Capriati was out of tennis by 2004 at age 28. On June 28, 2010, Capriati was recovering from an overdose of prescription drugs, according to a family spokesman.
Tags: Jennifer  Capriati 
Added: 28th June 2010
Views: 832
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Posted By: Lava1964

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