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Victor Mature and Lizabeth Scott i like this pic of Lizabeth Scott and Victor Mature in the 1949 movie, EASY LIVING . . he reminds me of Chris Noth?
Tags: film  easy  living  victor  mature  lizabeth  scott 
Added: 4th October 2007
Views: 2154
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Posted By: Teresa
1942 Movie Life Magazine Rita Hayworth and Victor Mature, December 1942. . . still think he looks like Chris Noth!
Tags: movie  life  magazine  rita  hayworth  victor  mature 
Added: 23rd October 2007
Views: 1964
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Posted By: Teresa
Fatty Arbuckle Scandal 1921 One of the most tragic figures in movie history was Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. A onetime cabaret singer, Arbuckle was among the most popular actors in silent comedies from 1914 to 1921. Starting as an extra at Keystone Studios, the surprisingly nimble Arbuckle quickly graduated to starring roles in the studio's slapstick comedy films where he was noted for his terrific accuracy in throwing pies and other missiles. Later, like Charlie Chaplin, Arbuckle matured as a performer, adding brilliantly subtle aspects to his comedy routines. A box-office favorite, he was making a seven-figure salary at Paramount Pictures in 1921. Midway through that year Arbuckle was so popular that he was put to work on three feature comedy films simultaneously! Shortly after completing them, Arbuckle's career abruptly ended in scandal. He was accused of sexually assaulting small-time actress Virginia Rappe at a party he was hosting in a suite at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco on Labor Day 1921. Rappe died four days later in a maternity hosptal of peritonitis from a ruptured bladder, presumably caused by the 266-pound Arbuckle forcing himself on her. (There was also an apocryphal story of Rappe being raped with a champagne or cola bottle. How this slanderous story started is anyone's guess.) Rappe had become violently ill and irrational at the party. Arbuckle and several partygoers tried to succor Rappe and eventually moved her to another hotel room where she was examined by three different doctors over the next three days. A postmortem on Rappe's body found no signs of sexual assault whatsoever. In all likelihood Rappe death's was due to medical negligence or malpractice. Moreover, Rappe was hardly the virginal victim that the popular press and D.A.'s office portrayed her to be. The mistress of director Henry Lehrman, Rappe had had at least four abortions by the time she was 16, she had an out-of-wedlock child that she had abandoned, and she was afflicted with gonorrhea. In the summer of 1921 the 26-year-old Rappe, who hadn't had an acting job in two years, recently underwent another illegal abortion. Rappe was also suffering from a chronic illness that was exacerbated by her taste for poor-quality Prohibition booze. The accusations against Arbuckle were based solely on a malicious complaint fabricated by party attendee Maude Delmont, a known extortionist who claimed to be a "lifelong friend" of Rappe's--but had only known Rappe for two days prior to the Labor Day party. Arbuckle was astounded when a horde of reporters descended upon his Hollywood mansion to tell him he was being investigated for rape and possible murder charges in Rappe's death. Beginning in late September, Arbuckle was tried three times for rape and manslaughter in the space of seven months. He spent $700,000 on legal fees to beat the bogus charges. The prosecution's case was absurdly weak and should have been dropped. In fact, complainant Delmont was never called as a witness because her wild story of Arbuckle assaulting Rappe for an hour did not jibe with the physical evidence nor the timeline of events at the party. Nevertheless, the San Francisco D.A.'s office doggedly pursued the charges against Arbuckle because of intense pressure by reformers and moralists. The first two trials resulted in hung juries. At the first trial, Arbuckle fared terrifically when he eagerly took the stand to defend himself. It ended with the jury voting 10-2 in favor of acquittal. One stubborn holdout was a militant feminist so determined to convict Arbuckle that she refused to read any portions of the trial's transcript or listen to other jurors' opinions--to the point of childishly putting her hands over her ears! The second trial, in which Arbuckle's legal team badly advised him not to bother to take the stand because his innocence was obvious, was surprisingly 9-3 in favor of conviction! At the third trial, in April 1922, Arbuckle wisely took the stand. The jury deliberated for a mere six minutes before returning with a not guilty verdict that was loudly cheered by the gallery. Furthermore, the jury also insisted a formal apology to Arbuckle be read into the trials' official transcript. Film historians generally believe Arbuckle was totally innocent of any wrongdoing and was the victim of malicious prosecution. Nevertheless, his acting career abruptly ended because newly appointed Hollywood censorship czar Will Hays banned distributors from showing any Arbuckle comedies despite being acquitted! Although filmdom was deprived of a master comic's work, Arbuckle stayed in movies by directing films under an assumed name. He was just beginning to make an acting comeback--with six two-reel comedie--when died of heart failure in 1933 at age 46. According to Arbuckle biographer David A. Yallop, in an era when Hollywood stars routinely engaged in all sorts of debauchery, Roscoe, ironically, "was probably the most chaste man in Hollywood."
Tags: Roscoe  Fatty  Arbuckle  scandal  1921 
Added: 16th November 2007
Views: 2980
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Posted By: Lava1964
Olga Korbut 1972 Olympics I can't honestly claim to be a gymnastics fan, but even I was captivated by Olga Korbut in 1972. Prior to the Munich Olympics, the world's dominant female gymnasts were mature, balletic-type women. Korbut ushered in the era of pixie-like pubescent teenage gymnasts.
Tags: Olga  Korbut  1972  Olympics  Munich 
Added: 15th December 2007
Views: 2025
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Posted By: Lava1964
Ann Bancroft Born as Anna Maria Italiano in the Bronx in 1931, Anne Bancroft didn't quite fall into the category of a 'classic' actress. She didn't break into films until 1952. But she appeared on screen with Marilyn Monroe, Richard Widmark, Cornel Wilde, Susan Hayward, and Victor Mature. After appearing in her first film, but not really finding the roles she wanted, she returned to New York and the stage, finding success, and a Tony award opposite Henry Fonda in 'Two For the Seesaw' (1958). The following year she appeared in the stage version of 'The Miracle Worker', and eventually returned to Hollywood in 1962, starring with Patty Duke in the film adaptation of the play, and winning a Best Actress Oscar with her first nomination. She was on a roll throughout the 60's, including a second Best Actress Oscar nomination for 'The Pumpkin Eater' (1964), then '7 Women' (1966), and finally her famous role as Mrs. Robinson in 'The Graduate' (1967), resulting in another Oscar nomination and a lifetime association with the part. She was nominated five times for Best Actress. Ann was married to the great comedy director Mel Brooks since 1964, and worked with him many times. She was still a very young 73 years old when she passed away on June 6, 2005, and is missed by so many of us.
Tags: ann  bancroft  actresses  mel  brooks  the  miracle  worker 
Added: 22nd January 2008
Views: 1920
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Posted By: Naomi
Giant Slot Car Track My obsession also as a kid.My race mate best friend still has thunderjet and AFX cars from our youth 20 or so. Some worth nearly $100 we paid 3-5 dollars for .We ordered parts from Scranton to change gearing ,rewind armatures, stronger magnets the works!I couldn't find a clearer vid.But I TOTALLY IDENTIFY!
Tags: slot  car  cars  ho  afx  tiet  thunderjet 
Added: 3rd January 2008
Views: 1519
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Posted By: tommy7
Featured Member - Donmac I was born in a small town on the banks of the river Tay in Scotland, 1961. Like many others I played football in the streets, went camping and my personal favourite, long bicycle rides. Also playing a large part of my formative years were TV and cinema and being that I lived next door to our local Odeon cinema I was on first name terms with the staff so never had to pay for entry and the highlight of my week being the Saturday morning cinema kids club. Left school well educated but with no real purpose in mind so wandered from job to job which in a way helped me take part in stage, film and TV exta work, a real passion and a great hobby. I had even thought of becoming a professional actor but was told by many that it was a hard egg to crack, so my wanderings continued. My life as was, was brought to an abrupt halt in 1999 which since then has made me focus on the future and become more mature, rather than the self centred, egotistical person I used to be and now with a great partner who sees me through the the good and the bad times. I work full time for the Savation Army and have became a comitted Christian and in a small way, feel that I make a difference in the lives of others.
Tags: Featured  Member  -  Donmac   
Added: 10th May 2008
Views: 1577
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Posted By: Steve
Suzanne Pleshette  Dies Jan 19th 2008  She Will Be Missed Suzanne Pleshette, the husky-voiced star best known for her role as Bob Newhart's sardonic wife, Emily, on television's long-running "The Bob Newhart Show," has died at age 70. Pleshette, whose career included roles in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and in Broadway plays including "The Miracle Worker," died of respiratory failure Saturday evening at her Los Angeles home, said her attorney Robert Finkelstein, also a family friend. Pleshette underwent chemotherapy for lung cancer in 2006. "The Bob Newhart Show, a hit throughout its six-year run, starred comedian Newhart as a Chicago psychiatrist surrounded by eccentric patients. Pleshette provided the voice of reason. Four years after the show ended in 1978, Newhart went on to the equally successful "Newhart" series in which he was the proprietor of a New England inn populated by more eccentrics. When that show ended in 1990, Pleshette reprised her role - from the first show - in one of the most clever final episodes in TV history. It had Newhart waking up in the bedroom of his "The Bob Newhart Show" home with Pleshette at his side. He went on to tell her of the crazy dream he'd just had of running an inn filled with eccentrics. "If I'm in Timbuktu, I'll fly home to do that," Pleshette said of her reaction when Newhart told her how he was thinking of ending the show. Born Jan. 31, 1937, in New York City, Pleshette began her career as a stage actress after attending the city's High School of the Performing Arts and studying at its Neighborhood Playhouse. She was often picked for roles because of her beauty and her throaty voice. "When I was 4," she told an interviewer in 1994, "I was answering the phone, and (the callers) thought I was my father. So I often got quirky roles because I was never the conventional ingenue." She met her future husband, Tom Poston, when they appeared together in the 1959 Broadway comedy "The Golden Fleecing," but didn't marry him until more than 40 years later. Although the two had a brief fling, they went on to marry others. By 2000 both were widowed and they got back together, marrying the following year. "He was such a wonderful man. He had fun every day of his life," Pleshette said after Poston died in April 2007. Among her other Broadway roles was replacing Anne Bancroft in "The Miracle Worker," the 1959 drama about Helen Keller, in New York and on the road. Meanwhile, she had launched her film career with Jerry Lewis in 1958 in "The Geisha Boy." She went on to appear in numerous television shows, including "Have Gun, Will Travel,""Alfred Hitchcock Presents,""Playhouse 90" and "Naked City." By the early 1960s, Pleshette attracted a teenage following with her youthful roles in such films as "Rome Adventure,""Fate Is the Hunter,""Youngblood Hawke" and "A Distant Trumpet." She married fellow teen favorite Troy Donahue, her co-star in "Rome Adventure," in 1964 but the union lasted less than a year. She was married to Texas oilman Tim Gallagher from 1968 until his death in 2000. Pleshette matured in such films as Hitchcock's "The Birds" and the Disney comedies "The Ugly Dachshund,""Blackbeard's Ghost" and "The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin." Over the years, she also had a busy career in TV movies, including playing the title role in 1990's "Leona Helmsley, the Queen of Mean." More recently, she appeared in several episodes of the TV sitcoms "Will & Grace" and "8 Simple Rules ... For Dating My Teenage Daughter." In a 1999 interview, Pleshette observed that being an actress was more important than being a star. "I'm an actress, and that's why I'm still here," she said. "Anybody who has the illusion that you can have a career as long as I have and be a star is kidding themselves."
Tags: suzanne  pleshette  bob  newhart  show    tom  poston  cancer 
Added: 20th January 2008
Views: 2225
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Posted By: Sophia
Dewey Defeats Truman The infamous headline in the Chicago Daily Tribune that prematurely declared Thomas Dewey the winner of the 1948 U.S. presidential election based on early projections. Harry Truman got a kick out of it.
Tags: Dewey  Defeats  Truman  headline 
Added: 11th February 2008
Views: 1505
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Posted By: Lava1964
Scream Queen Hazel Court Dies at 82 Hazel Court, an English actress who co-starred with the likes of Boris Karloff and Vincent Price in popular horror movies of the 1950s and '60s, has died. She was 82. Court died early Tuesday of a heart attack at her home near Lake Tahoe, daughter Sally Walsh said Wednesday. While she had a substantial acting career both in England and on American TV, Court was perhaps best known for her work in such films as 1963's "The Raven." She co-starred with Price, Karloff and Peter Lorre in director Roger Corman's take on the classic Edgar Allan Poe poem. Corman directed her in five movies. Like other "scream queens" of the era, Court often relied on her cleavage and her ability to shriek in fear and die horrible deaths for her roles. "The Premature Burial,""The Masque of the Red Death,""The Curse of Frankenstein" and "Devil Girl from Mars" helped propel her to cult status and brought her fan mail even in her later years. 'She'd probably get over 100 pieces of fan mail a month and she would reply to every single one,' her daughter said. Court had finished an autobiography, "Hazel Court - Horror Queen," which will be published in Britain.
Tags: hazel  court  horror  scream  queen  hammer  films  roger  corman  boris  karloff  vincent  price  christopher  lee  peter  cushing 
Added: 17th April 2008
Views: 1893
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Posted By: Naomi

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