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Rare 1913 Liberty Head Nickel In 1913, the Indian Head nickel (commonly known as the buffalo nickel) was introduced, replacing the Liberty Head design that had been used since 1883. These were the first official strikings of nickels in 1913; the United States Mint's official records show no Liberty Head nickels were produced that year. Yet five Liberty Head nickels dated 1913 came to the attention of the numismatic community in 1920. All five were in the possession of Samuel Brown, a coin collector who attended the American Numismatic Association's annual convention and displayed the coins there. Brown had previously placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 seeking information on these coins and offering to pay $500 for each. Ostensibly, the coins had been purchased as a result of this offer. However, Brown had been a Mint employee in 1913, so many numismatic historians have concluded that he illegally struck the coins himself and then removed them from the Mint. Other numismatic authorities, however, note there are several methods by which the coins could have been legitimately produced. For instance, they may have been lawfully issued by the Mint's Medal Department 'for cabinet purposes,' or they could be trial pieces struck in late 1912 to test the following year's new coinage dies. In January 1924 Brown sold all five 1913 Liberty Head nickels. The intact lot passed through the hands of several other coin dealers before finally being purchased by Colonel E.H.R. Green. Green kept them in his collection until his death in 1936. When his estate was auctioned, all five of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels were purchased by two dealers, Eric P. Newman and B.G. Johnson. The dealers broke up the set for the first time. The fictional theft of one of the 1913 Liberty Head nickels (known as the Olsen specimen) was the focal point of a December 1973 episode of the popular police drama Hawaii Five-0. It was titled 'The $100,000 Nickel' (which indeed was the value of the coin at the time). Rumors of the existence of a sixth 1913 Liberty Head nickel occasionaly circulate. If one did surface in perfect condition, numismatic experts estimate it could command $20 million at auction. You might want to check your piggy bank...
Tags: numismatics  1913  nickel  rare 
Added: 20th May 2011
Views: 1749
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Buckwheat Hoax 1990 ABC News found itself in an embarrassing position in 1990. Acting on a viewer's tip, 20/20, ABC's weekly news magazine, aired a "Where are they now?" segment about former Our Gang member Buckwheat. The story claimed that Buckwheat, whose real name was Bill English, was modestly employed as a grocery bagger at a Tempe, AZ supermarket. Immediately following the broadcast, dozens of Our Gang fans called ABC to tell the network they had been duped by an imposter. The real Buckwheat was named Billie Thomas--and he had died of a heart attack in 1980. Among the whistle-blowers was Our Gang alumnus Spanky McFarland who had worked alongside Thomas from 1934 until 1942. (Buckwheat stayed with the series until its conclusion in 1944.) Shortly after the hoax was exposed, a reporter from A Current Event interviewed McFarland via satellite from his home in Dallas while simultaneously interviewing English via satellite from Tempe. English came across as mumbling, evasive, incoherent, and thoroughly unconvincing. Moreover, English claimed to be the "first Buckwheat"--even though there was only one. The fallout of the debacle was that Lynn Murray, the producer of the 20/20 segment, was fired for doing inadequate research. Thomas's son sued ABC for damages. Hugh Downs issued an on-air apology on the following 20/20 broadcast. ABC News released a half-hearted, semi-apologetic media statement describing the situation as awkward "because English truly believes he is Buckwheat." English went to his grave in November 1994 still maintaining he was Buckwheat.
Tags: Buckwheat  hoax  Our  Gang  ABC  20/20 
Added: 21st August 2011
Views: 3144
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gomer gets a Marine Haircut Tags: Gomer  gets  a  Marine  Haircut,  crew  cut,  USMC,  Gomer  Pyle  USMC,  Gomer  Pyle,  haircut,  Floyd  the  Barber,  Marine,  Marine  Haircut 
Added: 4th November 2011
Views: 2253
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Posted By: pfc
Oliver Sipple - The Man Who Saved Gerald Ford On September 22, 1975, 33-year-old Oliver Sipple (the man with the sideburns in the left of the photo) was walking past the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco where President Gerald Ford was scheduled to speak. As Sipple moved forward to better hear Ford's speech, he noticed a woman standing next to him (later identified as Sara Jane Moore) reach into her raincoat and pull out a revolver. Sipple yelled, "Gun!" and instinctively grabbed for her arm and deflected it as she pulled the trigger. The bullet, intended for the president who was just 40 feet away, ricocheted off a wall and slightly wounded another bystander. Sipple, a decorated Vietnam vet, tackled Moore, prevented her from shooting again, and handed her over to the Secret Service. Oliver Sipple now became a reluctant celebrity. He was immediately hailed in the national press and received thousands of letters praising his heroics. However, President Ford only sent him a short note and avoided a personal meeting. News organizations wondered why the White House was avoiding Sipple. Although he was openly gay, Sipple’s sexual orientation was a secret from his family and employers. Accordingly, he asked the press to keep his sexuality off the record. However, news organizations refused to comply. The gay community saw the situation as a great opportunity. While discussing whether or not Sipple’s sexuality ought to be disclosed, prominent gay San Francisco's councilman Harvey Milk noted: “For once we can show that gays do heroic things, not just all that caca about molesting children and hanging out in bathrooms.” Milk further suggested that Sipple’s sexual orientation was the reason he received only a note from Ford rather than a formal invitation to the White House. Herb Caen, a columnist at The San Francisco Chronicle, outed Sipple as gay. The Chicago Sun-Times called him a ‘Homosexual Hero’; The Denver Post used the more pithy term ‘Gay Vet’. In Detroit, Sipple’s staunch Baptist family became the subject of ridicule and abuse by friends and neighbors. His mother refused to talk to him. When she died in 1979, his father told him not to attend the funeral. Sipple filed a $15-million invasion of privacy suit against seven newspapers and various publishers, but after a long and bitter process, the courts held that Sipple himself had become news, and that his sexual orientation was part of the story. Oliver Sipple sank into a downward spiral of depression, alcoholism, obesity and drug abuse. By the time he was found dead with an empty bottle of bourbon in 1989, Oliver Sipple was already a forgotten footnote to ethics and freedom of press. His apartment was littered with press clippings about that fateful day in 1975 when he saved a man’s life and subsequently ruined his own.
Tags: Oliver  Sipple  gay  assassination  hero  Ford 
Added: 9th July 2012
Views: 2484
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Aloysius Travers - Emergency Pitcher One of the most interesting pitching lines in MLB history belongs to Aloysius (Al) Travers, a 20-year old seminary student, who pitched once for the Detroit Tigers in 1912--a complete-game 24-2 loss to the defending World Series champion Philadelphia A's. Of course there has to be an explanation: Travers wasn't really a pitcher! He was hastily recruited among a group of local Philadelphia amateur ballplayers to replace the striking Detroit Tigers. The Tigers' regulars walked off the field shortly before game time at Philadelphia's Shibe Park on Saturday, May 18, 1912 to protest the suspension of center fielder Ty Cobb. (Cobb had jumped into the stands during a game in New York three days earlier to fight a heckler.) Faced with a potential forfeit and a huge fine, the Tigers' management recruited Travers and other amateur players as emergency replacements. Travers was the ersatz Tigers' only pitcher--and he wasn't even good enough to make the baseball team at St. Joseph's College. Be that as it may, Travers was forced to face some of the most vaunted hitters in the majors in front of 20,000 fans. In eight innings, he allowed 24 runs (14 earned), and 26 hits. Travers also walked seven A's and struck out one. He was paid $25 for his efforts. Travers, shown here in a photograph taken late in his life, eventually became a priest. To date, Travers is the only priest known to have pitched in an MLB game.
Tags: baseball  Aloysius  Travers  Detroit  Tigers 
Added: 18th July 2012
Views: 2576
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Posted By: Lava1964
Queen of Mean Convicted, 1992 Leona Helmsley, nicknamed the "Queen of Mean" by the press, receives a four-year prison sentence, 750 hours of community service, and a $7.1 million tax fraud fine in New York. For many, Helmsley became the object of loathing and disgust when she quipped that "only the little people pay taxes." Leona's husband, Harry, was one of the world's wealthiest real estate moguls, with an estimated $5 billion to $10 billion in property holdings. The couple lived in a dazzling penthouse overlooking Central Park and also maintained an impressive mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut. Leona, who operated the Helmsley Palace on Madison Avenue, was severely disliked by her employees. Though they lavishly furnished their homes and hotel, the Helmsleys were curiously diligent about evading the required payments and taxes for their purchases. Much of their personal furniture was written off as a business expense, and there were claims that the Helmsleys extorted free furnishings from their suppliers. Contractors were hardly ever paid on time-if at all-and many filed lawsuits to recover even just a portion of what they were owed. Leona reportedly also purchased hundreds of thousands of dollars of jewelry in New York City but insisted that empty boxes be sent to Connecticut so that she could avoid the sales tax. Given her offensive personality, many were quite pleased by Leona's legal troubles. Even celebrity lawyer Alan Dershowitz could not win her immunity from the law. Following her conviction, Federal Judge John Walker publicly reprimanded her, saying, "Your conduct was the product of naked greed [and] the arrogant belief that you were above the law." Leona Helmsley was sent to jail in 1992 and was released in 1994. In 2002, Helmsley, whose husband Harry died in 1997, again found herself in court after being sued by Charles Bell, a former employee who accused Leona of firing him soley because he was homosexual. A jury ordered Helmsley to pay him more than $11 million in damages. Helmsley died in August 2007 at age 87. She famously left $12 million to her dog, Trouble.
Tags: News 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 895
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Super Bowl XXXI 31January 26 1997 Green Bay Packers Tribute It had been nearly three decades since Vince Lombardi's powerhouse Packers ruled the NFL. But the wait was finally over when Green Bay's loyal fans were rewarded in 1996 as the Pack stormed to the league's best record en route to Super Bowl XXXI. The Win comes back to "Titletown USA" by bringing the Lombardi Trophy back home.They beat the New England Patriots 35-21
Tags: Super  Bowl  XXX  31January  26  1997  Green  Bay  Packers  Tribute 
Added: 17th August 2012
Views: 1029
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Posted By: masonx31
Pop Qwiz Popcorn 1990 1990s Colors included yellow, blue, green, and a mystery bag with a surprise color. I'm not sure how many of you will remember this stuff, but it was just too weird not to mention. Video store chains became especially popular during the early 90s; a fact proven by the insidious amount of Blockbuster commercials strewn into TV breaks at the time. As more and more movie nights were staged from home, popcorn finally shed its "theater treat" stigma for good while sales soared. Those microwaveable bags of kernels became and remain a staple in most households, with several companies competing for the coveted top spot. Yes, there's competition in popcorn. So how do you make one popcorn more attractive than the other? For the most part, it's all the same shit. Covering the packaging with pretty colors and in-your-face fonts only took these companies so far, and while dubious additions like cheddar dust and Cajun red spice helped differentiate the products, General Mills had something else in mind. Something strange. "Pop Qwiz." Perhaps the first and only popcorn marketed exclusively towards children. Thrown under General Mills' "Pop Secret" banner, Pop Qwiz really broke the mold. Junk food with a gimmick is common nowadays, but this stuff was pretty unique in 1991. Basically, it was just regular, buttered popcorn dyed in every color of the rainbow. You had bags of red popcorn, blue popcorn, green, yellow, you name it. That alone was sure to bring in a substantial clientele -- kids'll eat anything that looks odd. Pop Qwiz had more to offer than weird colors, though. While each of the mini-sized bags had correspondently bright colors, the colors of the bags didn't necessarily match the shade of the popcorn within. What was surely just a cost cutting measure was sold to us as a "game" -- it was up to us to guess which popcorn color was in each bag. The point of the game is up for debate, as we got to eat all of the popcorn even if we guessed wrong. Taking things even further, the bags had all sorts of quizzes, puzzles, and other stupid games printed right on 'em. Children always appreciate things tailored specifically for them, and while popcorn wasn't an important victory, we took it with great pride. We had our own popcorn. Tomorrow, the world. You'd have to imagine that some kids would've begged for Pop Qwiz just by passing the colorful box in grocery stores, but the point was really driven home with General Mills' ad campaign. This was crucial for ten trillion reasons, and I swear, I've counted. Okay, how often do you see popcorn advertised during children's programming hours? It's pretty rare, so Pop Qwiz was playing to an audience its competitors never even thought to tackle. Another point: when a kid wants popcorn, words are rarely minced. "I want popcorn." That's all that's ever said. No specific brands are mentioned, no bias towards one particular popcorn is conveyed. Just a simple "I want popcorn." By throwing the "Pop Qwiz" title in our heads, General Mills created a sense of inadvertent brand loyalty. If we wanted popcorn, we asked for popcorn. If we wanted crazy wacky colored popcorn, we asked for Pop Qwiz. And what kid wouldn't always prefer crazy wacky colored popcorn? This was all much more brilliant than it seemed on the surface, and the commercial was a real keeper to boot. I know I focus more on earlier years with these articles, but as I was entering my ugly, lonely teen years during the 90s, I ended up watching a whole lot more television. Alone. This "Pop Qwiz" ad, to me, is just as synonymous with the time as any of the big ones, including that PSA where the Ninja Turtles exposed the dangers of marajuana. It surprises me that the snacks weren't very successful -- I guess the world just wasn't ready to accept, much less eat radioactive green popcorn. Artists are so often unappreciated in own their time, even if they only work in kernels.
Tags: Pop  Qwiz  Popcorn  1990 
Added: 19th August 2012
Views: 2211
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Posted By: masonx31
Airplane 2-Irony Can Be Pretty Ironic This scene is loaded with gems of puns~!
Tags: Airplane  2-Irony  Can  Be  Pretty  Ironic  William  Shattner    Robert  Hays  Julie  Hagerty  Lloyd  Bridges  Chad  Everett  Peter  Graves  Rip  Torn  Chuck  Connors  Stephen  Stucker  Wendy  Phillips  Sonny  Bono   
Added: 7th September 2012
Views: 1689
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Posted By: Steve
Concentration Final Episode - 1973 On March 23, 1973 the memory-based game show Concentration ended its hugely successful run of nearly 15 years as an NBC daytime program. In this clip host Bob Clayton bids a kind farewell to the show's loyal fans. Clayton hosted the show from 1969 to 1973. It had previously been hosted by Hugh Downs from 1958 through 1965. Clayton was the show's announcer when Downs was the host. Jack Barry, Art James, and Bill Mazer all hosted the show in the years between Downs' and Clayton's tenures. A few months into 1969, Ed McMahon replaced Clayton--which proved to be an extremely unpopular decision. When ratings started to tank, Clayton was brought back as host. Clayton died of cardiac arrest in 1979; he was only 57. Interesting bit of trivia: Concentration was the last game show to employ an organist to provide live music.
Tags: Concentration  game  show  last  episode 
Added: 9th October 2012
Views: 1857
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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