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Great Blizzard of 1888 Snowstorms have paralyzed major cites for as long as North America has had major cities. The most devastating storm was likely the Great Blizzard of 1888 that crippled most of America's major eastern seaboard cities north of Washington, DC and into Canada. What made this blizzard so bad was that it came as a total surprise. In the days leading up to March 12, 1888, there had been unseasonably mild weather. People on the streets of New York City were walking around without overcoats. The "Great White Hurricane," as some folks dubbed it, struck with a fury. Torrential rains began falling, and on March 12 the rain changed to heavy snow, temperatures plunged, and a ferocious wind began. The storm continued unabated for the next 36 hours. Sources vary, but the National Weather Service estimated that 50 inches of snow fell in Connecticut and Massachusetts and 40 inches covered New York and New Jersey. Winds blew up to 48 miles an hour, creating snowdrifts 40 to 50 feet high. The resulting transportation crisis led to the creation of the New York subway, approved in 1894 and begun in 1900. Telegraph and telephone wires snapped, isolating New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington for days. Two hundred ships were grounded, and at least 100 sailors died. Fire stations were immobilized, and property loss from fire alone was estimated at $25 million. Overall, more than 400 storm-related deaths were reported.
Tags: Blizzard  1888 
Added: 24th November 2014
Views: 1164
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Theme From The Bridge on the River Kwai The Bridge on the River Kwai won the Oscar for Best Picture of 1957. It also re-popularized "The Colonel Bogey March"--a British military song dating back to 1914. It is one of those melodies that sticks in your mind forever. In this scene from early in the film, a new batch of British Empire troops whistle the tune as they march into captivity in a brutal Japanese labor camp.
Tags: Bridge  on  the  River  Kwai  theme 
Added: 12th July 2015
Views: 1418
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 1069
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Posted By: Lava1964
He And She - Failed Sitcom 1967 In the fall of 1967 CBS introduced one of its first urbane, "sophisticated" situation comedies--He & She. It flopped despite having an excellent cast. Real-life husband and wife Richard Benjamin and Paula Prentiss played Dick and Paula Hollister. Dick was a cartoonist; Paula worked for Travelers' Aid in New York City. Dick's creation of Jetman was turned into a TV series with Jack Cassidy playing the role. Even though it had two blockbuster hits (The Beverly Hillbillies and Green Acres) preceding it in CBS' Wednesday night lineup, viewers generally did not stick around for He & She. Benjamin believed that the two popular lead-in shows actually served to hurt He & She because its urban comedy was a world apart from that of the rural sitcoms. Twenty-six episodes were made in the lone season it aired. Here is the opening montage.
Tags: He  and  She  CBS  sitcom  flop 
Added: 6th November 2015
Views: 948
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The New Monkees - 1987 Sitcom Flop The original sitcom The Monkees aired on NBC for two seasons (1966 to 1968). Along with winning an Emmy for best sitcom of 1966, the original Monkees were responsible for several top 40 hit songs, including I'm a Believer, Last Train to Clarksville, and Pleasant Valley Sunday. A very successful nostalgic twentieth anniversary reunion tour by the group in 1986 wrongly convinced some folks in the syndicated TV world that the time was ripe for a second Monkees series to be produced for a new generation. It was a spectacular failure. Like the first Monkees series, extensive tryouts were held to find four actors to play the roles. Unlike the first series, only actors with proven musical abilities were considered. In the end the four main cast members of The New Monkees were Marty Ross, Dino Kovas, Larry Saltis, and Jared Chandler. On the show, the band lived in a large mansion with a butler named Manford (played by Gordon Oas-Heim). The mansion had numerous unexplored rooms and was the main source of the lads' adventures. Instead of a normal kitchen and dining room, the house featured a full diner with a waitress named Rita (played by former exercise instructor Bess Motta of 20 Minute Workout fame). Also present in the mansion was a talking computer called Helen (voiced by Lynnie Godfrey) who used to work for the Defense Department but found that she preferred rock music over missiles. The plots routinely forced the audience to suspend reality. One episode had Larry falling asleep on a copy machine--resulting in numerous Larry clones creating chaos throughout the mansion. Neither sitcom nor music fans ever took to the show nor to the lone album the group produced. Disappointing ratings caused the show to be cancelled after just 13 episodes even though 22 episodes were scheduled to be produced for the first season. Mickey Dolenz, the drummer in the original group, said he wasn't at all surprised The New Monkees bombed. Invoking a Star Trek analogy, Dolenz likened it to "giving another actor pointy ears and expecting viewers to accept him as Mr. Spock." Moreover, the four original Monkees sued Columbia Television Pictures for using the group's name. The case was settled out of court. Bit of trivia: Russell Johnson (most famous for playing the role of the Professor on Gilligan's Island) was the only person to appear on both Monkees series. The New Monkees has never been made available on DVD.
Tags: New  Monkees  sitcom  flop 
Added: 9th November 2015
Views: 1196
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hulk Hogan Meets Johnny Carson - 1982 In the early 1980s, pro wrestling was a regional enterprise with only a niche following. In 1982, Sylvester Stallone recruited Hulk Hogan to portray the role of Thunderlips in Rocky III, elevating Hogan to a new level of stardom and introducing him to a wider audience. This amusing clip is the 28-year-old Hogan's first appearance on The Tonight Show in June 1982. At that time, Hogan was employed by the American Wrestling Association (AWA). He had been with Vince McMahon Sr.'s World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF) from 1979 to 1982 but was fired for accepting the role in Rocky III. When Vince McMahon Jr. took over the reign of the WWWF (and shortened its name by one W to the WWF), Hogan was brought back into the organization in late 1983 and groomed to be its champion. (Excuse the two minutes of music and NBC promos in the middle of the clip.)
Tags: Hulk  Hogan  wrestling  Johnny  Carson  Tonight  Show 
Added: 19th May 2017
Views: 782
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Posted By: Lava1964
Irene Ryan and Bob Crane on Password Irene Ryan (Granny from the Beverly Hillbillies) and Bob Crane (colonel Hogan from Hogan's Heroes) are the celebrity players from this episode of Password circa 1967. Donna Douglas (Elly Mae from The Beverly Hillbillies) makes a surprise appearance as a contestant. The game's producers had a bit of fun with Donna's unmistakable good looks. (No doubt today's anti-sexism crowd would be up in arms over such obvious objectifying.)
Tags: Password  game  show  Irene  Ryan  Bob  Crane  Donna  Douglas 
Added: 31st July 2018
Views: 958
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Posted By: Lava1964

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