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Ben Stein Economics Lecture I find this clip from Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) very funny. A high school teacher (Ben Stein) bores his teenage pupils with an exceedingly dull economics/history lecture on the Hawley-Smoot Tariff Act of 1930. (There really was Congressional tariff legislation by that name!)
Tags: Ben  Stein  lecture  Ferris  Bueller   
Added: 13th August 2008
Views: 2899
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Posted By: Lava1964
Lynch Mob Violence A victim of a lynch mob dangles from a bridge, circa 1910. Between 1889 and 1941, there were at least 3,811 known cases of lynching in the United States. There was never any federal anti-lynching legislation passed because southern politicians saw lynching as a necessity to maintain order in their communities. Many of these acts of vigilantism were photographed and sold as souvenir postcards!
Tags: lynching 
Added: 8th September 2008
Views: 1447
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Posted By: Lava1964
Boxing Day - Commonwealth Nations From Wiki: Boxing Day was traditionally a day on which the servants had a day off from their duties. Because of this the gentry would eat cold cuts and have a buffet-style feast prepared by the servants in advance. In modern times many families will still follow this tradition by eating a family-style buffet lunch, with cold cuts rather than a full cooked meal. It is a time for family, parlour games and sports in the UK. The traditional recorded celebration of Boxing Day has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes were placed outside churches used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen. In the United Kingdom it certainly became a custom of the nineteenth century Victorians for tradesmen to collect their "Christmas boxes" or gifts in return for good and reliable service throughout the year on the day after Christmas. However, the exact etymology of the term "Boxing" is unclear, with several competing theories, none of which is definitively true. Another possibility is that the name derives from an old English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food). In addition, around the 1800's, churches opened their alms boxes (boxes where people place monetary donations) and distributed the contents to the poor. The establishment of Boxing Day as a defined public holiday under the legislation that created the UK's Bank Holidays started the separation of 'Boxing Day' from the 'Feast of St Stephen', and today it is almost entirely a secular holiday with a tradition of shopping and post-Christmas sales starting. We invite people who celebrate this holiday to contribute to the information here.
Tags: Boxing  Day  Commonwealth  Nations 
Added: 26th December 2009
Views: 954
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Posted By: Admin
Rebecca Schaeffer Murder 1989 Pretty Rebecca Schaeffer (pictured below) had an all-too-brief acting career. After she appeared on the cover of Seventeen magazine, she landed the role of Patti Russell on the short-lived CBS sitcom My Sister Sam. (The show ran from October 1986 to November 1987). During the show's run, an obsessed fan, Robert John Bardo, began writing letters to Schaeffer which were answered by CBS employees. Bardo twice tried to see Schaffer on the set but was turned away by security. After the show was cancelled, Bardo found Schaeffer's home address with the help of a private investigator who, for a $250 fee, obtained the information from California's Department of Motor Vehicles. On July 18, 1989, Bardo knocked on Schaeffer's apartment door and had a brief conversation with the actress. She asked him not to return. A little while later Bardo did return and fatally shot Schaeffer in the chest after she opened the door. She was 21. Bardo was apprehended a short time later, quickly confessed, and was sentenced to life in prison. Schaeffer's murder led to the first anti-stalker legislation in California (which has been widely copied in many jurisdictions). Among the celebrities who have benefitted from it or similar laws have been David Letterman and Madonna. The state of California also toughened its security policies regarding residents' personal information.
Tags: Rebecca  Schaeffer  murder  stalker 
Added: 9th June 2010
Views: 1511
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Posted By: Lava1964
1999 Tennessee Roadkill Bill In March 1999 Tennessee's state legislature became the butt of jokes for debating a so-called 'Roadkill Bill.' The intent of the bill was to make animals killed on the state's highways the property of anyone who wanted the mangled carcasses, presumably for a meal. The bill stated, 'Wild animals accidentally killed by a motor vehicle may be possessed by any person for personal use and consumption.' Wrote one aghast New York Times columnist, 'In other words, it would be legal to eat roadkill. Legal to eat the thousands of squirrels, opossums, raccoons and rabbits that meet a painfully horizontal death every year beneath rubber tires. As if a state law were preventing anyone from scraping a happy meal off the asphalt. As if anyone would even dream of it.' In one of his Tonight Show monologues, Jay Leno comically suggested Tennessee's state motto ought to be changed to 'Fender-Licking Good.'
Tags: Tennessee  Roadkill  Bill  legislation 
Added: 2nd February 2011
Views: 3390
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Posted By: Lava1964
Eighteenth Amendment Passed On January 16, 1919, the required 36 out of 48 states had ratified the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution The result: Prohibition would come into effect a year later. A newspaper of the day heralds the news. In 1933, America's great social experiment ended when Twenty-First Amendment rescinded the Eighteenth Amendment.
Tags: Prohibition  legislation 
Added: 12th February 2011
Views: 2072
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pay Toilets The first pay toilet in the United States was installed in 1910 in Terre Haute, Indiana. Pay toilets were prevalent in restaurants and other public buildings until the mid-1970s. However, a campaign by the Committee to End Pay Toilets In America (CEPTIA) resulted in laws prohibiting them in cities and states--legislation that was widely applauded by the public. In 1973, Chicago became the first American city to enact a pay-toilet ban. At the time, according to the Wall Street Journal, there were at least 50,000 units in America, mostly made by the Nik-O-Lok Company. CEPTIA was successful over the next few years in obtaining bans in New York, New Jersey, Minnesota, California, Florida and Ohio. Lobbying was successful in other states as well, and by decade's end, pay toilets were greatly reduced in America. However, they are surprisingly still in use in some places. Many people would be shocked to learn that pay toilets are once again legal as the CEPTIA-inspired bans from the 1970s have been repealed in many jurisdictions.
Tags: pay  toilets   
Added: 9th April 2011
Views: 5027
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dwight D. Eisenhower Born October 14, 1890 he was the last president to be born in the 19th century. Born from a large Dutch family in Kansas. He is a graduate of West Point and lead the successful invasion of North Africa, Germany and France during World War II. In 1951, he became the first supreme commander of NATO. After winning a landslide election to Adali Stevenson for president he deposed the leader of Iran in the 1953. Other achievements include creation of NASA after the Russians beat the US into space with the launch of Sputnik. Eisenhower also opposed Joseph McCarthy and contributed to the end of McCarthyism by openly invoking a modern expanded version of executive privilege. He also changed the landcape of America forever with forming the Interstate Highway System. He also signed civil rights legislation to protect the right to vote in 1957 and 1960. He died March 28, 1969 at the age of 78 at Walter Reed General Hospital in Washington, D.C. of congestive heart failure.
Tags: Dwight  D.  Eisenhower  Born  October  14,  1890  34th  United  States  President  five-star  general  in  the  United  States  Army  Army  Chief  of  Staff  under  President  Harry  S.  Truman  Vice  President  Richard  M.  Nixon  NASA    Supreme  Commander  of  the  Allied  Forces  in  Europe  Interstate  Highway  System;  the  Defense  Advanced  Research  Projects  Agency  DARPA 
Added: 14th October 2014
Views: 803
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Posted By: Cliffy
Senator Dirksen - Gallant Men Now for something a little bit different: One of the most recognizable senators of the 1950s and 1960s was Everett Dirksen of Illinois. His disheveled appearance belied a quick mind and masterful debating skills. Dirksen was so well known that he was a mystery guest on What's My Line? in 1967 and a special guest on Red Skelton's variety show. Although he was staunchly conservative, Dirksen was one of the senators most responsible for drafting civil rights legislation. In 1966 Dirksen recorded Gallant Men which cracked the Billboard top 40.
Tags: Senator  Everett  Dirksen  Gallant  Men  record 
Added: 2nd April 2015
Views: 601
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Posted By: Lava1964
London Great Smog - 1952 On Friday, December 5, 1952 a substantial fog rolled across London, England. This was not a particularly rare occurrence in that city. What made it memorable and lethal was the fact that it stayed for the better part of four days and basically brought the British capital to a standstill. The first week in December 1952 brought unusually cold weather to Great Britain. An unusual weather system known as an anticyclone moved over London. (Anticyclones are high pressure systems that create stationary surface hazes.) Not only was the thickening mist not moving, the smoke from the city's coal-burning furnaces in homes and offices was also trapped. In the early 1950s, the coal used in most London households was of a lower grade than the type used before the Second World War. (The higher quality coal was saved for export.) It also had a high sulfur content. Because the anticyclone was trapping both the fog and the coal smoke, the city was engulfed in a stinky blanket of mist that made many basic outdoor activities impossible. Driving became a dangerous adventure. City buses moved at a snail's pace, often with policemen preceding them on foot with torches. Within a short while bus service stopped altogether due to the low visibility. (The unaffected London Underground kept its schedule, however). Private cars were abandoned on the streets. Most outdoor activities, including sports events, were cancelled. The smog became so bad that it began to seep into indoor venues. Movie theaters and concert halls had to cancel shows because of diminished visibility. Finally, after four days of intense smog, a new weather system cleared London's skies on Tuesday, December 9. However, about 4,000 Londoners died from respiratory illnesses shortly thereafter related to breathing the unhealthy coal smoke. Health officials later put the death toll at about 12,000 from the lingering effects of what became known as The Great Smog. In 1956 the British parliament passed the Clean Air Act which mandated pollution controls and restricted furnaces to burning pollution-free fuels. The legislation worked. London has not experienced anything even close to The Great Smog of 1952 in all the years since then.
Tags: London  Great  Smog  pollution 
Added: 4th November 2015
Views: 697
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Posted By: Lava1964

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