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National Lampoon 1970 -1998 National Lampoon was an irreverent, ground-breaking American humor magazine. Its success led to a wide range of media productions associated with the magazine's brand name. The magazine ran from 1970 to 1998. It was originally a spinoff of the Harvard Lampoon. The magazine reached its height of popularity and critical acclaim during the 1970s, when it had a far-reaching effect on American humor. It spawned films, radio, live theatre, various kinds of recordings, and print products including books. Many members of the creative staff from the magazine went on to contribute to successful media of all types. During the magazine's most successful years, parody of every kind was a mainstay; surrealist content was also central to its appeal. Almost all the issues included long text pieces, shorter written pieces, a section of actual news items (dubbed "True Facts"), cartoons and comic strips. Most issues also included "Foto Funnies" or fumetti, which often featured nudity. The result was an unusual mix of intelligent, cutting-edge wit, and crass, bawdy frat house jesting. National Lampoon's humor often pushed far beyond the boundaries of what was generally considered appropriate and acceptable. Co-founder Henry Beard described the experience years later: "There was this big door that said, 'Thou shalt not.' We touched it, and it fell off its hinges." The magazine declined during the late 1980s and never recovered. It was kept alive minimally. (In 1992, for instance, only one issue was published.) It ceased publication altogether in 1998.
Tags: National  Lampoon 
Added: 5th February 2013
Views: 823
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Posted By: Lava1964
Avery Brundage Avery Brundage was the only American ever to become president of the International Olympic Committee--a position he held from 1952 to 1972. He was also the most controversial IOC head. Brundage had competed at the 1912 Stockholm Olympics in the decathlon and pentathlon. He later acquired significant wealth from his contruction company combined with some shrewd investments. His vast fortune skewed his views of amateurism. Since he was independently wealthy, he could not see why every other amateur athlete could not be self-sufficient too. As a result, Brundage believed the only true athletes were amateurs. He denounced pro athletes as entertainers. Brundage rose to become head of the United States Olympic Committee by 1936. That year he controversially allowed the American team to compete in the Berlin Olympics despite heavy public pressure to boycott the Nazi-themed Games. He personally disqualified one notable female American athlete, swimmer Eleanor Holm, for allegedly engaging in immoral behavior on the team's ocean voyage to Hamburg. (Years later Holm claimed she had rebuffed the married Brundage's advances and he suspended her out of spite.) After the 1936 Games, Brundage openly praised Nazi Germany's economic resurgence and newfound national pride. By 1952 he became head of the IOC and a staunch defender of pure amateur sports, saying that the ideal Olympian should be a Renaissance person with many interests--not just the financial benefits of being a pro athlete. Critics labelled him "Slavery Avery." Despite being anti-communist, Brundage was impressed by the Soviet Union's national physical fitness programs and was instrumental in getting the USSR into the Olympic movement. Brundage was still at the helm of the IOC at age 85 in 1972 when a terrorist attack killed 11 Israeli team members. Brundage called for a day of mourning and then insisted the Games continue-- a decision still controversial today. In one of his final public speeches as IOC head, Brundage favored abolishing the Winter Olympics because of their growing commercialization. He died in 1975.
Tags: Avery  Brundage  IOC 
Added: 5th February 2013
Views: 590
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Posted By: Lava1964
Tom Hanks on Family Ties Youthful Tom Hanks appeared in three episodes of the sitcom Family Ties as Elyse Keaton's troubled brother Ned Donnelly. In two episodes of the first season, Ned was a bright, young executive of a major corporation whose conscience prompted him to interefere in a hostile takeover of another company. In the second season the now jobless Ned has descended into alcoholism. This clip is from that episode. Hanks' superb acting ability comes shining through in this powerful scene.
Tags: Family  Ties  Tom  Hanks  Ned  Donnelly 
Added: 7th February 2013
Views: 1546
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Posted By: Lava1964
Chris Evert vs Tracy Austin 1977 Here are highlights from a highly anticipated third-round 1977 ladies' match at Wimbledon: tiny 14-year-old Tracy Austin--with braces on her teeth and her hair in pigtails--versus defending champion Chris Evert. These highlights are a little misleading as Evert won handily 6-1, 6-1. (Check out Tracy's "Shirley Temple" tennis outfit!)
Tags: tennis  Wimbledon  Evert  Austin 
Added: 17th February 2013
Views: 818
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Posted By: Lava1964
Johnny Maestro And The Brooklyn Bridge Worst That Could Happen 1969 Lead singer Johnny Maestro had been around for awhile before recording this great Jimmy Webb song. He'd been lead singer with the Crests since 1957 and sang on all their hits. He even had a couple of solo hits before joining the Del-Satins. No hits there, but Maestro and the Del-Satins then joined with an outfit called the Rhythm Method (cool name)to form the Brooklyn Bridge. Jimmy Webb's "Worst That Could Happen" had previously been recorded by the 5th Dimension in 1967, but not released as a single. Perhaps it should have been. But then, we might not have got to hear Johnny's great vocal which went all the way up to #3 on the Billbord chart.
Tags: Johnny  Maestro  Brooklyn  Bridge  Webb  Jimmy  1969 
Added: 19th February 2013
Views: 2693
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Posted By: kinkman
1939 Rangers-Leafs NHL Game This is a quaint National Film Board of Canada featurette on hockey titled Hot Ice. Most of it focuses on a New York Rangers-Toronto Maple Leafs game at Maple Leaf Gardens played on November 11, 1939. It features an interesting look at old-time hockey. Notice there is no center red line in 1939 and both teams share the same penalty box. Five months later the same two teams would meet in the 1940 Stanley Cup finals, with the Rangers prevailing in six games.
Tags: NHL  hockey  New  York  Rangers  Toronto  Maple  Leafs 
Added: 21st February 2013
Views: 845
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Posted By: Lava1964
Rod Laver Wins 1969 Grand Slam Here are a few highlights from the last set of the 1969 men's singles final at the U.S. Open. Rod Laver's four-set victory over fellow left-handed Australian Tony Roche meant Laver won all four major championships (Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon, and US Open) in one calendar year. No other male has achieved that feat in the Open Era of tennis. Laver's backhand is beautiful to behold. Check out how rough the grass courts were at Forest Hills that rainy year! Grass court players often wore spikes then. The score of the final was 7-9, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2. It was the last year at the U.S. Open when tiebreakers weren't played.
Tags: tennis  Rod  Laver  Grand  Slam  1969 
Added: 25th February 2013
Views: 640
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Posted By: Lava1964
Brien Taylor - Pitching Bust Brien Taylor was one of the most hyped amateur pitching prospects ever. Born in Beaufort, North Carolina, Taylor attended East Carteret High School. In his senior season, Taylor threw 88 innings, striking out 213 hitters while walking 28. His fastball often hit 98 and 99 mph. In 2006, agent Scott Boras claimed Taylor was the best high school pitcher he had ever seen. The New York Yankees selected Taylor with the first overall selection in the 1991 MLB draft and offered him $300,000 to sign a minor league contract, the typical amount given to the first overall draft choice at that time. However, Boras, acting as an advisor, told the Taylor family the previous year's top-rated high school pitcher, Todd Van Poppel, had gotten than $1.2 million to sign with the Oakland Athletics. Taylor held out for a three-year $1.2-million deal. He eventually signed for $1.55 million the day before he was to begin classes at a local junior college. The Yankees hoped Taylor would be the next Dwight Gooden and pitch in the majors at age 19. However Taylor needed to improve his pickoff move to first base, so he was assigned to the team's farm system. In 1992 Taylor was 6-8 for the Class A Fort Lauderdale Yankees, with a 2.57 earned run average and 187 strikeouts in 161 innings. The next year, as a 21-year-old with the Double-A Albany-Colonie Yankees, Taylor went 13-7 with a 3.48 ERA and had 150 strikeouts in 163 innings. Baseball America named him the game's best prospect and he was expected to pitch for the Triple-A Columbus Clippers of the International League in 1994 and start for the Yankees in 1995. On December 18, 1993 Taylor suffered a dislocated left shoulder and torn labrum while defending his brother in a fistfight. In the scuffle, Taylor fell on his pitching shoulder. Dr. Frank Jobe, a well-known orthopedic surgeon, called Taylor's injury one of the worst he'd seen. Taylor was never the same pitcher again. When he returned to baseball after surgery, his fastball was noticeably slower and he was unable to throw a curveball for a strike. Taylor spent the bulk of the remainder of his professional baseball career struggling at the Single-A level. Taylor bounced around different MLB farm teams until retiring in 2000. After baseball, Taylor moved to Raleigh and worked as a UPS package handler and later as a beer distributor. He fathered five daughters. By 2006, he was working as a bricklayer with his father. In January 2005, police charged Taylor with misdemeanor child abuse for allegedly leaving four of his children--none over 11--alone for more than eight hours. He didn't show up for his court date, and at one point there were four outstanding warrants for his arrest. According to financial records, he was earning $909 per month. In March 2012, Taylor was charged with cocaine trafficking after undercover narcotics agents purchased a large quantity of cocaine and crack cocaine from him over a period of several months. He was federally indicted on cocaine trafficking charges in June 2012. Taylor pled guilty in August 2012 and was sentenced to 38 months in prison, followed by three years' supervised release.
Tags: baseball  pitcher  Brien  Taylor 
Added: 4th March 2013
Views: 1259
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Posted By: Lava1964
Salvador Dali on Whats My Line Famed artist Salvador Dali appears as a memorable mystery guest on What's My Line in this episode from January 27, 1957. His broad range of talents and accomplishments has the esteemed WML panel bamboozled for quite a while.
Tags: WML  Salvador  Dali  artist 
Added: 4th March 2013
Views: 1170
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Posted By: Lava1964
Missing Beaumont Children - 1966 This is one of the saddest stories I've ever come across: Australia's most famous abduction case. On January 26, 1966, three siblings under the age of 10 vanished from Glenelg Beach on Australia Day, the country's national summer holiday. To many Australians it is the day their country lost its innocence. The three Beaumont children - Jane, nine; Arnna, seven; and Grant, four -- headed alone to the resort town of Glenelg Beach, a five-minute bus ride from their Adelaide home at about 10 a.m. Due back at 12 noon, their parents raised the alarm when they failed to return by 3:30 p.m. Several witnesses said the three Beaumont children had been spotted in the presence of a blond man at the beach. He was never identified and the children have not been sighted since. Their disappearance spawned one of the largest police investigations in Australian criminal history. Understandably, it forever changed parents' attitudes in Australia about how they supervised their youngsters. In all likelihood, the children, who had often traveled to the resort without their parents, had become friendly with their abductor in earlier visits to Glenelg Beach. After one such visit, Arnna told her mother that Jane "had a boyfriend" at the beach. The mother assumed Arnna was talking about another child--not an adult. On the morning the Beaumont children vanished, Jane bought some treats from a refreshment stand with a one-pound note. Her mother had only given Jane enough coins to cover the children's two-way bus fares. The case remains unsolved.
Tags: Australia  missing  children  Beaumont  abduction 
Added: 3rd June 2014
Views: 1002
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Posted By: Lava1964

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