Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!


Search
Search:
 
The Doobie Brothers Appear On Whats Happening The Seventies rockers made an appearance on a two-part episode of the series in which the kids are forced to record a performance by the band at their high school. The performance includes the classic "Taking It to The Streets."
Tags: TV 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 273
Rating:
Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Dorothy Arnold - Missing Socialite One of the most intriguing missing persons cases in American history centers around a 24-year-old New York socialite, Dorothy Arnold, who seemingly vanished into thin air one afternoon in New York City in 1910. Arnold was from a wealthy family, the daughter of the 73-year-old head of a prosperous import company and the niece of a Supreme Court justice. Educated at Bryn Mawr, Dorothy was an aspiring writer. On Monday, December 12, 1910, Dorothy left her New York City home at about 11 a.m. telling her mother she would be shopping for an evening gown for an upcoming event. Dorothy left the house with only the clothes on her back and about $30. Arnold went to a candy store and a bookstore where she bought items using the Arnold family credit. When she left the bookstore, Dorothy encountered Gladys King, a friend. King was the last known person to have seen Dorothy. No one who saw Dorothy on December 12 noticed anything odd about her behavior. She apparently never purchased the dress, so she had either lied to her mother or had been interrupted before she could buy it. On the day of her disappearance, Dorothy was fashionably dressed and was a familiar face in New York City. Therefore, it is unlikely that Dorothy could have ventured far without being noticed. That evening, when Dorothy strangely had not returned home for dinner, the Arnold family began making inquiries among her friends. They were unable to turn up any news of their daughter. Fearing some sort of scandal, Dorothy's family did not call the police right away--which was typical of the era. Anyone calling the Arnold home inquiring about Dorothy was told she was in bed with a headache. Dorothy's parents hired a lawyer who privately tried to find Dorothy for six weeks. His investigation got nowhere, so the police were finally contacted in late January of 1911. By that time, Dorothy's trail had gone hopelessly cold. Newspapers played up the story--especially in New York City. It led to several hoaxes, including two phony ransom notes being sent to the Arnold home and a postcard purportedly sent overseas by Dorothy. These were quickly dismissed as inauthentic. After 75 days, the police closed the case under the assumption that Dorothy was dead. However as late as 1935 the New York City police were still receiving tips about alleged sightings of Dorothy. So what happened to Dorothy? She had been unofficially engaged to a 42-year-old man named George (Junior) Griscom--a situation which displeased her family who considered him to be a loafer. There was absolutely no evidence that she and Junior had a falling out or had run away together. In fact, Junior put out several ads imploring Dorothy to contact him, but to no avail. He eventually moved on with his life. Another theory was that Dorothy was upset that her parents had cruelly mocked her for wanting to become a writer and because two of her stories had recently been rejected by magazines. Thus some people speculate Dorothy committed suicide believing that she was a failure. Still no one had evidence that she was anything but happy on the day she disappeared. Yet another theory is that Dorothy died at an illegal abortion clinic and her body was swiftly incinerated in the building's furnace--which was known to happen in 1910. In 1921, John H. Ayers, who headed New York City's Missing Persons Bureau, curiously told an auditorium filled with high school students that Dorothy's fate had always been known to the police and her family but he did not elaborate any further. When journalists pressed him for more details, he quickly claimed he had been misquoted.
Tags: missing  persons  case  Dorothy  Arnold 
Added: 16th January 2015
Views: 78
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Toking With Lawrence Welk Tags: Toking  With  Lawrence  Welk  One  Toke  Over  The  Line  Sweet  Jesus  duet  Gail  Farrell    Dick  Dale  drug  marijuana  getting  high   
Added: 24th January 2015
Views: 152
Rating:
Posted By: Music Maiden

Pages: 82 83 84 85 86 87 [88] of 88 | Random