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National Lampoon 1970 -1998 National Lampoon was an irreverent, ground-breaking American humor magazine. Its success led to a wide range of media productions associated with the magazine's brand name. The magazine ran from 1970 to 1998. It was originally a spinoff of the Harvard Lampoon. The magazine reached its height of popularity and critical acclaim during the 1970s, when it had a far-reaching effect on American humor. It spawned films, radio, live theatre, various kinds of recordings, and print products including books. Many members of the creative staff from the magazine went on to contribute to successful media of all types. During the magazine's most successful years, parody of every kind was a mainstay; surrealist content was also central to its appeal. Almost all the issues included long text pieces, shorter written pieces, a section of actual news items (dubbed "True Facts"), cartoons and comic strips. Most issues also included "Foto Funnies" or fumetti, which often featured nudity. The result was an unusual mix of intelligent, cutting-edge wit, and crass, bawdy frat house jesting. National Lampoon's humor often pushed far beyond the boundaries of what was generally considered appropriate and acceptable. Co-founder Henry Beard described the experience years later: "There was this big door that said, 'Thou shalt not.' We touched it, and it fell off its hinges." The magazine declined during the late 1980s and never recovered. It was kept alive minimally. (In 1992, for instance, only one issue was published.) It ceased publication altogether in 1998.
Tags: National  Lampoon 
Added: 5th February 2013
Views: 1384
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Posted By: Lava1964
Taiwan Dominates 1973 LLWS The 1973 Little League World Series featured total domination by the team from Tainan City, Taiwan. In their three games not only did the Taiwanese team record three shutouts (18-0, 27-0, and 12-0), they did not even surrender a hit to their hopelessly outclassed opponents. Because there was no mercy rule in LLWS play at the time, in their final two games the Taiwanese players deliberately bunted into outs when victory was assured. Ed Vosberg, who became a much-travelled MLB pitcher (nine teams in 10 seasons), played first base for the Tucson, AZ team that lost to Tainan City in the finals. Vosberg had pitched a one-hitter in his team's semifinal victory versus Birmingham, MI. The dominance of the Tainan City team was so thorough it compelled the Taiwanese ambassador in Washington to issue the following apology: "I am sorry we were so good."
Tags: 1973  Little  League  World  Series  baseball   
Added: 26th December 2013
Views: 1517
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Posted By: Lava1964
Happy Days - Richie Moves Out West It is pretty much agreed that the heyday of Happy Days was its first three or four seasons. Ron Howard (who played Richie Cunningham) left the show in 1980 after six years. (According to the plot, Richie and friend Ralph Malph had joined the Army.) Nevertheless, Happy Days continued until 1984. Howard returned for a special two-part episode in the fall of 1983. In this moving scene, Richie says his goodbyes after announcing he will be pursuing his dream to become a screen writer in California. Tissue alert! Be prepared!
Tags: Happy  Days  Richie  Ron  Howard  farewell  scene 
Added: 19th March 2013
Views: 1474
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Posted By: Lava1964
Kirby Puckett with David Letterman Kirby Puckett was one of the most popular and talented baseball players of his generation. He played 12 seasons with the Minnesota Twins from 1984 to 1995, leading them to World Series titles in both 1987 and 1991. In what would turn out to be Puckett's final MLB game, he was struck by a pitch by Dennis Martinez that broke his jaw on September 28, 1995. Puckett was hitting well during spring training of 1996, but woke up one morning unable to see out of his right eye. Suffering from glaucoma, Puckett was forced to retire. He became an executive with the Twins. This appearance on David Letterman's program took place in 1997. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. Puckett's final years were marred with accusations of violence, marital infidelity, sexual misconduct, spousal abuse, and other unseemly behavior that resulted in the Twins severing ties with him. Sports Illustrated ran an extremely unflattering cover story by Frank Deford on Puckett in a 2003 issue that chronicled his disturbing "secret life." Wrote Deford, "The media and the fans in Minnesota turned the Twins' Hall of Famer into a paragon of every virtue—-and that made his human flaws, when they came to light, all the more shocking." Puckett died of a cerebral hemorrhage eight days before his 46th birthday in 2006.
Tags: Kirby  Puckett  MLB  baseball  Minnesota  Twins  interview 
Added: 6th December 2013
Views: 957
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Posted By: Lava1964
Muhammad Ali on Race -1971 In 1971 Muhammad Ali was interviewed on British television. As usual, as with any Ali interview from that time, the topics of discussion drifted far afield from boxing. This segment delved into racial issues. Be prepared for a shock as Ali bluntly gives his views on the evils of race mixing.
Tags: Muhammad  Ali  1971  BBC  interview  race 
Added: 4th June 2013
Views: 1596
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Posted By: Lava1964
Hogans Heroes Trading Cards Did you know that Fleer issued trading cards based on the TV sitcom Hogan's Heroes in 1965-66? The set consisted of 66 individual cards. Some specimens that are in especially good condidtion sell for around $30 apiece.
Tags: Hogans  Heroes  TV  trading  cards 
Added: 25th June 2013
Views: 1169
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Posted By: Lava1964
Vanishing TV Character - Judy Winslow Jaimee Foxworthy played Judy, the youngest of the three Winslow children, on the ABC sitcom Family Matters. At least she did on the first four seasons from 1989 to 1993. When the show's focus started to shift towards oddball neighbor Steve Urkel, Judy's role got progressively smaller. When Foxworthy demanded a pay hike for the fifth season, the producers just dropped her from the show with no explanation. (One fan comically declared Judy was sent to her room in one episode--and never came back.) Judy Winslow thus became a noteworthy victim of Chuck Cunningham Syndrome (named for Richie and Joanie Cunningham's older brother on Happy Days who vanished after a few episodes and was never heard from or referred to again): For the rest of the series' nine-season run, there were several times when the Winslows said they had just two children. As a young adult, Foxworthy suffered from substance-abuse issues. She ended up working in pornographic films for a short time using the name Crave.
Tags: Jaimee  Foxworthy  Family  Matters  Judy  Winslow 
Added: 7th November 2014
Views: 991
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Posted By: Lava1964
Readers Digest August 1970 Issue Date: August 1970; Vol. 97, No. 580 Articles, subjects and contributors in this issue: COVER: Bicycle Byway by Ralph Avery. From Bach to Books by Jeffrey R. Haskell. The Crow and the Oriole by James Thurber. Boss of the Park -- Umpires -- by Bill Surface. The Plains a Boy a Summer Day by Hal Borland. 41 Ways to Beat the High Cost of Living. Russia's Menacing New Challenge in the Middle East by Joseph Alsop. We Need Our Young Activists by John D. Rockefeller 3rd. Portrait of a Mobster -- Carlos Marcello -- by William Schulz. Sexual Inadequacy -- And What Can Be Done About It by Will Bradbury. How to Talk With Your Teen Ager About Drugs by Herman W. Land. Toward a Livable Environment: I Victory in the Everglades by Jean George. II A Sensible Plan for Future Development by James Nathan Miller. The Car in the River by E. D. Fales Jr. Bold New Directions for U S High Schools by Arlene Silberman. Poverty at the Border by Lester Velie. Try Giving Yourself Away David Dunn. Japan -- All Asia Watches and Wonders by Carl T. Rowan. The Gifts of Gregory Menn by Joseph P. Blank. Better Living With Machinery by Charles McDowell Jr. L Dopa Has Set Me Free by Floyd Miller. Time to Knock Out the Vote Thieves! by Louis B. Nichols. Provocative; Prophetic Margaret Mead by David Dempsey. How to Murder Your Husband by Jean Mayer. Rugged Idaho by Don Wharton. They Go to Prison on Purpose Arthur Gordon. What the Moon Rocks Reveal by Fred Warshofsky. The Lesson of the Lemmings by Ola and Emily d'Aulaire. Bottoms Up! by Jack Goodman and Alan Green. The Duel That Changed Our History by Thomas Fleming. Paper Magic of Origami by and Akira Yoshizawa by Leland Stowe. KGB: The Swallows' Nest "KGB" by John Barron.
Tags: Readers  Digest  August  1970  articles  magazine   
Added: 26th December 2014
Views: 2177
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Posted By: Cathy
San Diego Tank Rampage - 1995 On May 17, 1995, residents of San Diego, CA had their lives and property imperiled by an M-60 Patton tank! The armored vehicle had been stolen from a military base by Shawn Timothy Nelson, a 35-year-old former veteran who was known to have mental stability issues. As this Discovery Network feature shows, for a while law enforcement had absolutely no way to stop the devastating rampage--until Nelson inadvertently disabled the tank himself on a concrete highway median. Police theorize Nelson was on his way to create havoc at a local hospital that he had recently unsuccessfully sued for malpractice.
Tags: tank  theft  rampage  San  Diego  Shawn  Nelson 
Added: 16th March 2015
Views: 1157
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Posted By: Lava1964
President Truman Threatens Music Critic President Harry S. Truman had one child--daughter Margaret--who was born in 1924. She began singing locally in choirs in Missouri as a youth. By the late 1940s, when her father was president, she got more noteworthy singing gigs on the radio and in occasional concerts. On December 5, 1950 Margaret performed a program of Schumann, Schubert and Mozart pieces at Constitution Hall in Washington. The Washington Post's music critic, Paul Hume, wrote, "Miss Truman is a unique American phenomenon with a pleasant voice of little size and fair quality. She is extremely attractive on stage. Yet Miss Truman cannot sing very well. She is flat a good deal of the time--more so last night than at any time we have heard her in past years." Upon reading Hume's review, father Harry's paternal instincts kicked in and he went berserk. The president quickly penned a blistering missive to Hume that called him a "frustrated old man who wishes he could have been successful." It concluded with the president bluntly stating, "Some day I hope to meet you. When that happens you'll need a new nose, a lot of beefsteak for black eyes, and perhaps a supporter below." Hume was astonished by the letter and showed it to his editor who planned to print it in the next issue of the Post. However, the paper's publisher nixed the idea. Nevertheless, Hume told Milton Berliner, the music critic of the Washington News, about HST's threatening letter. The story ran in the rival newspaper and was later widely circulated well beyond the District of Columbia via the wire services.
Tags: Harry  Margaret  Truman  singer  criticism  threat 
Added: 5th July 2015
Views: 1698
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Posted By: Lava1964

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