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DAY OF INFAMY SPEECH IN RESPONSE TO THE JAPANESE ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR 12 07 41 This address, by President Franklin D Roosevelt, given on December 8, 1941, is regarded as one of the most famous American political speeches of the twentieth century. Roosevelt's speech had an immediate and long-lasting impact on American politics. Thirty-three minutes after he finished speaking, Congress declared war on Japan, with only one Representative, Jeannette Rankin, voting against the declaration. The speech was broadcast live by radio and attracted the largest audience in US radio history, with over 81 percent of American homes tuning in to hear the president. The response was overwhelmingly positive, both within Congress and the nation.
Tags: day  of  infamy  speech  president  franklin  d  roosevelt  attack  on  pearl  harbor  december  7  1941 
Added: 6th December 2007
Views: 3015
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Posted By: Guido
Milli Vanilli-Girl Im Gonna Miss You Milli Vanilli was a pop/dance music project formed by Frank Farian in Germany in 1988, fronted by Fab Morvan and Rob Pilatus. The group's debut album achieved high sales internationally which earned them a Grammy Award for Best New Artist in 1990. The act became one of the most popular pop acts in the late 1980s and early 1990s. However, their success turned to infamy when their Grammy was revoked after it was revealed that the lead vocals on the record were not the actual voices of Morvan and Pilatus. In 1998, ten years after Milli Vanilli's initial debut, Pilatus was found dead in a Frankfurt hotel of an apparent drug overdose.
Tags: Milli    Vanilli    Girl    You    Know    It 
Added: 14th October 2009
Views: 1160
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Posted By: pfc
The Outlaw 1941 The Outlaw was Jane Russell's controversial breakthrough movie role. Producer Howard Hughes made this flick about the life of Billy The Kid in 1941, but it did not see general release until 1946. The Hays Office, responsible for censorship at the time, considered The Outlaw to be overtly sexual. (The film would likely get a G rating today.) Hughes knew what sold: He had designed a cantilevered brassiere to showcase Russell's ample assets! Hughes gladly kept the film out of circulation knowing full well its infamy would pay off in box office receipts upon its release.
Tags: Jane  Russell  The  Outlaw  Howard  Hughes 
Added: 25th October 2009
Views: 1707
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Posted By: Lava1964
1916 Booby Quarter By the 1910s the Art Nouveau movement was influencing the designs of American coinage. In 1916 designer Hermon McNeil created what he thought was an attractive portrait of Lady Liberty for the new silver 25-cent piece. No red flags were raised as the design received official approval for mintage in late 1916 for distribution in January 1917. Instead of winning applause, however, the coin caused outrage because the Standing Liberty figure (as it is known to collectors) has her right breast exposed. Moralists decried the image as obscene and decadent. The public's response was so swift and negative that the Treasury Department modified the die for future strikes to cover the exposed breast with armor--even doing so without the official approval of Congress. Furthermore, the federal government did its best to recall the original allotment of 52,000 coins. That was easier said than done. First, any new coin is largely hoarded by collectors for its novelty. Second, the small mintage of these coins enhanced their desirability among collectors. Third, the infamy attached to this coin made it even more collectible than usual. Therefore most of the 1916 "booby quarters" did not stay in circulation very long before they were stashed away by average citizens as curiosity pieces (and perhaps erotic souvenirs). According to the Treasury Department, however, the public's moral outrage had nothing to do with the more modest revised design. It was supposedly symbolic. With war clouds looming, it was thought that Lady Liberty should be shown as fully protected by armor rather than being seen as partially exposed and vulnerable.
Tags: 1916  Standing  Liberty  quarter  breast  numismatics 
Added: 27th October 2016
Views: 595
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Posted By: Lava1964

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