Welcome Guest! YouRememberThat.com is 100% FREE & fast to join! Upload, comment, create your own profile and more!



Check our brand new site TheRetroSite , although YouRememberThat will remain for quite some time we expect this new site to be our new home. Click over and create your account on the new mobile friendly and flexible site today!
Search
Search:
 
Near Air Disaster - 1983 Gimli Glider Incident A mistake in metric measurement nearly caused a catastrophic airplane disaster over Canadian airspace in the summer of 1983. Known to Canadians as "the Gimli Glider," on Saturday, July 23, 1983, Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767-233 jet, ran out of fuel at an altitude of 41,000 feet. It was about halfway through a flight originating in Montreal en route to Edmonton with a stopover in Ottawa. Although both engines conked out due to lack of fuel, the crew was able to glide the aircraft safely to an emergency landing at Gimli Industrial Park Airport, a former Royal Canadian Air Force base in the small community of Gimli, Manitoba. An investigation later found out the airplane had run out of jet fuel because it had wrongly been fueled in litres rather than imperial gallons. Luckily for the 61 passengers onboard, the flight crew was familiar with glider flying techniques and was able to safely land the huge aircraft. With some difficulty, the airplane touched down on a small runway that had recently been converted from an abandoned military airstrip to to a race track. A race event was underway at the time but was stopped in time to allow the aircraft to land. An official investigation later revealed "company failures and a chain of human errors that combined to defeat built-in safeguards."
Tags: Air  Canada  Gimli  Glider  aviation 
Added: 12th November 2013
Views: 1075
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bat-Throwing Incident- 1972 ALCS During the first two games of the 1972 American League Championship Series, Oakland's Bert Campaneris was the best player on the field. With Oakland having defeated Detroit in the first game and leading 5-0 in the seventh inning of the second game, Detroit manager Billy Martin ordered relief pitcher Lerrin LaGrow to throw a pitch at the speedy Campaneris' ankles. As this clip shows, Campaneris reacted by throwing his bat at LaGrow! Both players were ejected and suspended for the rest of the ALCS.
Tags: MLB  1972  ALCS  Campaneris  LaGrow  incident  bat 
Added: 29th October 2014
Views: 1340
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Boston Bruins vs NY Rangers Fans - 1979 The NHL in the 1970s could often be wild. This was epitomized as the decade neared its end on Sunday, December 23, 1979. On that date the visiting Boston Bruins angrily invaded the stands at Madison Square Garden to administer frontier-style justice on a few New York Rangers fans who had taken some liberties. (It's hard to see the exact cause of the fracas in this video, but this is what happened: A fan, 30-year-old John Kaptain, reached over the glass and belted Boston's Stan Jonathan across the face with a rolled-up program and drew blood. Kaptain then grabbed Jonathan's stick. After that...mayhem ensued!) Among the most enraged Bruins was the normally peaceable Peter McNab. Feisty Terry O'Reilly, not surprisingly, was the most zealous participant. The enduring image, however, is Mike Milbury ripping a shoe from Kaptain's foot and beating him with it! Milbury eventually threw Kaptain's shoe onto the ice. O'Reilly and Milbury would both later coach the Bruins. Kaptain, who attended the game with his brother James and his father Manny, had to make his way home from Madison Square Garden minus one shoe. Some 300 Ranger fans attacked the Bruins' bus outside the arena. Because of this crazy incident, the NHL mandated the height of the protective glass surrounding all teams' ice surfaces be dramatically increased. John Kaptain died in 1999.
Tags: Boston  Bruins  NHL  fight  New  York  Rangers  fans  brawl 
Added: 11th February 2015
Views: 1383
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Oregon Poisoned Eggs Accident - 1942 On Wednesday, November 18, 1942 a horrible mistake killed 47 patients at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem--a facility housing those afflicted with mental illnesses. An evening meal of scrambled eggs was being prepared by the two-person kitchen crew. The cooking staff had been much larger, but the manpower demands of the Second World War had reduced it to just head cook Mary O'Hare and her male assistant A.B. McKillop. Against hospital policy, McKillop designated a trusted patient, 27-year-old George A. Nosen, to go to a downstairs storage room to get a scoopful of powdered milk to add to the frozen egg yolks. Nosen entered the wrong room and brought back a six-pound scoop of roach poison from an unmarked bin. The roach poison contained huge amounts of sodium fluoride. In very tiny amounts, sodium fluoride is harmless. It is found in most toothpastes in minuscule amounts to strengthen teeth. However, even an amount as small as an aspirin can be deadly to a human. Within a short time of the eggs being served, patients became violently ill, some vomiting blood. By midnight 30 patients had died. The death toll eventually rose to 47. About 460 patients in total suffered some ill effects. McKillop quickly suspected something had gone terribly amiss because of the powdered milk. This was confirmed when Nosen showed him the bin where it had come from. Investigators were perplexed as the kitchen staff initially reported that nothing outside the norm had happened in preparing the meal. Beyond the hospital theories abounded about what may have caused the deaths. Some people blamed them on a deliberate act of malice by a homicidal patient. Others thought it was an extreme case of salmonella due to improper food storage. Still others thought it might be war-related sabotage as the frozen egg yolks were the same type that were being sent overseas to feed American troops. Eventually McKillop's conscience bothered him and he told the truth about Nosen mistaking the roach poison for powdered milk. McKillop wanted to be held solely responsible for the mishap, but he, O'Hare and Nosen were all arrested. They were never charged as a Grand Jury ruled the incident to have been merely a tragic accident--one that killed nearly four dozen innocent patients. Nosen remained an inmate at the hospital--where he was looked upon as a pariah--until his death in 1983 at age 68. He suffered a fatal heart attack while scuffling with a 75-year-old patient.
Tags: poisoned  eggs  Oregon  1942 
Added: 27th April 2015
Views: 1403
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Howard Cosell-Alvin Garrett Incident Love him or hate him, Howard Cosell was pretty much the personification of ABC's Monday Night Football from its inception in 1970 through the 1983 season. During the first Monday night game of the 1983 NFL season between the Washington Redskins and the Dallas Cowboys, Howard Cosell made the following comment about diminutive Washington wide receiver Alvin Garrett: "That little monkey sure gets loose, doesn't he?" Immediately Cosell came under fire from a black minister, the Reverend Joseph Lowery of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Lowery called the remark racist and demanded Cosell apologize or be fired. Cosell was stunned by the allegation. He said the term 'little monkey' was a term of endearment--which he often used to describe his own grandchildren. Indeed, anyone who fairly examined Cosell's body of work knew he had supported black athletes time and time again in truly divisive racial disputes. Jesse Jackson and Muhammad Ali both publicly supported Cosell. Garrett himself said he knew that Cosell meant no harm. Someone even found a clip from a preseason football telecast from 1972 in which Cosell referred to Mike Adamle--a small Caucasian player--as "a little monkey." Nevertheless, Cosell's tenure with Monday night football ended without much fanfare at the end of the 1983 season. He covered the boxing tournament at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and not much else afterward. When Cosell was not assigned to work ABC's coverage of the 1985 World Series, it was obvious that ABC had quietly put the aging Cosell--its iconic broadcaster--out to pasture.
Tags: Howard  Cosell  Alvin  Garrett  racism  incident 
Added: 11th July 2015
Views: 1088
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Chuck Hughes - 1971 NFL Fatality Despite its obvious inherent violence, the National Football League has only ever had one fatality occur on the field since it first began play in 1921--and it occurred from an undiagnosed heart ailment rather than from a bone-jarring collision. On October 24, 1971, Chuck Hughes of the Detroit Lions died during the final two minutes of a home game at Tiger Stadium versus the Chicago Bears. Hughes was born in Pennsylvania in 1943 but grew up in Texas with his 14 siblings. He set several school records for pass receiving at Texas Western University. He had spotty NFL career that began with the Philadelphia Eagles. By 1971 Hughes was used mostly as a special teams player and occasionally at wide receiver. On that fateful day Hughes collapsed while returning to the Lions' huddle following a play that did not involve him. Before his collapse it had been a very uneventful game for Hughes. The Bears held a 28-23 lead in a see-saw battle when the Lions got the ball back for one last drive toward the end zone. With under two minutes to go, Lions' quarterback Greg Landry dropped back and found Hughes on a crossing pattern for a 32-yard gain. He was sandwiched and brought down by two Bear defenders at the Chicago 37-yard line. Unhurt, Hughes popped up immediately and ran back to the Detroit huddle. It was the fifteenth and last catch of Chuck Hughes' career. After two straight incompletions Hughes was walking slowly back to the line of scrimmage when he suddenly grabbed his chest and fell to the ground. Some fans initially thought that Hughes might be faking an injury to give the Lions more time to devise their next play. But everyone in the stadium quickly became aware that something was terribly wrong when they saw Chicago's Dick Butkus waving his arms frantically at the Detroit bench and yelling for help. Team doctors Edward Guise and Richard Thompson rushed onto the field in an attempt to revive the lifeless Hughes. Guise began mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while Thompson performed CPR. They were joined by Dr. Eugene Boyle, an anesthesiologist from Gross Pointe, MI, who descended from the stands. It was all to no avail. Hughes was pronounced dead at Henry Ford Hospital. He was 28. The photo of the incident shown here led many people to wrongly believe that Dick Butkus had administered a fatal blow to Hughes. Hughes' cause of death was declared to be a coronary thrombosis, which caused a massive myocardial infarction which cut off the blood flow to his heart. Hughes had had concerns about chest pains weeks before October 24, but a medical examination turned up nothing amiss. Hughes' family eventually sued Henry Ford Hospital for malpractice and was given an out-of-court settlement. Hughes left behind a young widow and a son who was not quite two years old. The Lions have retired Hughes' jersey #85.
Tags: NFL  fatality  Chuck  Hughes  1971 
Added: 23rd November 2015
Views: 1884
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Schumacher-Battiston Incident - 1982 World Cup Here's one of the worst fouls you'll ever see at a sporting event--and it went unpunished because none of the officials saw it. During a semifinal match at the 1982 World Cup soccer tournament in Spain. West German goalkeeper Toni Schumacher leveled France's Patrick Battiston with a reckless challenge moments after Battiston missed a terrific scoring opportunity. Apparently few people saw what had occurred as everyone's attention--including the referee's--was focused on the ball going wide of the West German goal. How badly was Battiston injured? The French player lost two teeth, suffered three cracked ribs, had damaged vertebrae, and was knocked unconscious! No foul was called on Schumacher. After a 3-3 deadlock, the West Germans won the game in a penalty shootout.
Tags: soccer  Toni  Schumacher  Patrick  Battiston  1982  World  Cup  incident 
Added: 12th June 2017
Views: 591
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Bing Davdison Tragic Death One of Hollywood's lesser known tragedies was the death of small-time actor James (Bing) Davidson, a 25-year-old Nebraskan who fell to his doom in 1965. Davidson, whose screen credits show just three small roles, was in the company of actor Paul Lynde in San Francisco on July 17, 1965. Lynde was well known to be a heavy drinker; he and Davidson had both heavily imbibed that night. At some point of drunkenness at the Drake Hotel, Davidson decided to demonstrate a daredevil stunt--hanging from a balcony by his fingertips. In full view of several horrified onlookers (and police officers who had been summoned), Davidson lost his grip and fell to his death from the eighth floor of the hotel. Lynde was absolved of any blame, but the incident was hushed up for years as the circumstances surrounding it may have derailed Lynde's acting career.
Tags: Bing  Davidson  fall  Paul  Lynde   
Added: 9th July 2017
Views: 3554
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Black Tom Explosion 1916 Even though the United States was neutral nation in 1916, it was still occasionally affected by acts of war. The most notable to happen on land was the Black Tom explosion on July 30, 1916, in Jersey City, NJ. It was an act of sabotage by German agents to destroy American-made munitions that were to be supplied to the Allies in the First World War. Black Tom was originally a man-made island constructed around a large black rock in New York Harbor that was a well-known hazard to naval navigation. It was eventually connected by the Lehigh Valley Railroad to the mainland and was absorbed into Jersey City. It became a major munitions depot even before the war. Shortly after midnight on July 30, 1916, a series of small fires was discovered on the pier. Some guards tried to fight the fires while others fled, fearing an explosion. They had good reason to fear such a calamity as 2 million pounds of explosives and small arms were stored on Black Tom Island awaiting shipment to Czarist Russia. The feared explosion came; actually there were several explosions. The first and biggest occurred at 2:08 a.m. It had the force of an earthquake measuring 5.5 on the Richter scale. Flying fragments caused more than $100,000 in damages to the Statue of Liberty on its gown and torch. (To date, the torch has never been reopened to the public.) Windows 25 miles were shattered and the explosion was felt as far away as Philadelphia. Four people were definitely killed by the blast--including an infant. Some sources claim the fatality total was seven. Blame originally was directed at Black Tom Island watchmen who had lit small smudge-pot fires to drive away mosquitoes, but they were quickly absolved of blame when the true nature of the fires showed obvious evidence of arson. German saboteurs were blamed for the incident which caused $20 million in damages. The Leigh Valley Railroad successfully sued the German government after the war but had no success in collecting any compensation until 1953 when the West German government agreed to pay $95 million. The final payment was made in 1979.
Tags: Black  Tom  Explosion  1916  German  sabotage 
Added: 13th January 2018
Views: 796
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The Second Hundred Years - Sitcom Flop The 1960s were famous for producing far-fetched sitcoms. Here is another that aired briefly on ABC: The Second Hundred Years. Starring Monte Markham and Arthur O'Connell, its crazy plot had O'Connell playing Edwin Carpenter, a man whose gold-prospecting father (Luke) was swept by an avalanche into an Alaskan glacier in 1900. Another avalanche 67 years later conveniently exposed Luke's frozen carcass. Miraculously he was revived--without having aged in the intervening years! Thus Luke now physically resembled his 33-year-old grandson, Ken. (Luke and Ken were played by the same actor, of course, Monte Markham.) Furthermore, for national security reasons, the general public was not allowed to know about this remarkable incident. The show's plots frequently focused on Ken and Luke being able to take the other's place in social situations, and in the culture shock Luke experienced in suddenly going from 1900 to 1967. (In one episode Luke saw a go-go dancer in a cage, thought she was being held against her will, and "rescued" her.) The Second Hundred Years premiered on September 3, 1967 to fairly strong ratings, but it was universally panned by TV critics. Within a very short time it dropped into the bottom 25 network shows and was cancelled after 26 episodes. Here is a promotional clip that aired on ABC just before its premier.
Tags: Monte  Markham  The  Second  Hundred  Years  sitcom  Arthur  O 
Added: 5th April 2018
Views: 569
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] of 6 | Random