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Petticoat Junction Girls 1965 This TV guide cover from April 1965 shows the three Bradley girls from Petticoat Junction. (Gunilla Hutton was a cast member for the 1964-65 season only.)
Tags: Petticoat  Junction  Bradley  girls  TV  Guide 
Added: 23rd October 2009
Views: 4176
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Starsky and Hutch TV opening After its 1975 pilot film proved a ratings success ABC gave approval for a full series of STARSKY AND HUTCH, an action-packed cop show that enjoyed a four season run. Paul Michael Glaser and David Soul starred as unorthodox plain clothes police officers Dave Starsky and Ken "Hutch" Hutchinson, fighting crime with the occasional assistance of their hip street snitch Huggy Bear (played by Antonio Fargas). Bernie Hamilton co-starred as their superior, Captain Dobey, and an additional star was the tire-squealing Ford Gran Torino that was frequently in the middle of the action.
Tags: Starsky  Hutch  David  Soul  Paul  Michael  Glaser  Antonio  Fargas  Bernie  Hamilton  Ford  Gran  Torino  1970s  TV  television  cop  show  police  crime  drama  action   
Added: 29th October 2009
Views: 1917
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Posted By: robatsea
Wheezer - Our Gang Robert Hutchins joined the Our Gang troupe in 1928 as a three year old. (He acquired the nickname 'Wheezer' on his first day on the set when he ran around so much he began to wheeze.) Hutchins appeared in 58 Our Gang shorts through 1933 where he usually played a tag-along little brother. His acting career was controlled by a father so domineering he wouldn't allow the other cast members to play with his son during breaks in shooting. He planned to be a pilot, but Hutchins died in 1945 at age 20 in an airplane crash during his last week of flight school.
Tags: Our  Gang  Wheezer  Robert  Hutchins 
Added: 9th November 2009
Views: 2494
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Posted By: Lava1964
Gunilla Hutton-Nat King Cole Romance Gunilla Hutton was the Swedish singer/dancer who was the second actress to play eldest sister Billie Jo Bradley on Petticoat Junction. She was also a regular on Hee Haw for many years; her character was appropriately named Nurse Goodbody. Less well known is Hutton's involvement with Nat King Cole. At age 20, she began a romantic tryst with the legendary singer, who was 47, while she toured with his show. Had the public learned about it at the time (1964), the interracial affair and their age difference would have been a major scandal. Still, Cole was prepared to divorce Maria, his wife of 21 years, but ill health entered the equation. Cole was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer. Knowing he had only a short time to live, Cole opted to stay with his wife instead of Hutton.
Tags: Gunilla  Hutton  Nat  King  Cole  affair 
Added: 12th November 2009
Views: 43201
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseball Hitting Famine 1968 This 1968 issue of Sports Illustrated discussed the 'hitting famine' in Major League Baseball. The offensive dearth reached its depths during the 1968 season, which baseball historians rightfully call 'the year of the pitcher.' That season Don Drysdale set a new record for consecutive shutout innings pitched. Bob Gibson's ERA was a ridiculous 1.12. Carl Yastrzemski won the American League batting title with a mere .301 average. The decline in offense can be traced back to 1962 when MLB allowed teams to raise the pitching mound beyond its rulebook height of 15 inches, if they so desired. (It was done as a knee-jerk reponse to the the big home run season of 1961.) However, the new height of the mound gave the pitchers a huge edge. The mound at Dodger Stadium was reputedly 20 inches high in the heyday of Sandy Koufax and Drysdale. The decline in offense adversely affected attendance. The hitting famine era ended when the pitcher's mound was reduced to its modern height of ten inches in 1969.
Tags: baseball  hitting  famine 
Added: 7th December 2009
Views: 1457
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mysterious Life of Rudolf Hess One of the strangest stories of the Second World War was the bizarre flight of Rudolf Hess, Adolf Hitler's deputy, who unexpectedly parachuted into Scotland on May 10, 1941 on a mysterious mission, apparently undertaken on his own. (This photo shows the wreckage of his plane.) The details of Hess' mission are still shrouded in mystery; the British government will not release its official documents until 2016. Historians tend to believe that Hess boldly 'dropped in' on Britain to negotiate a separate peace with the western Allies so Nazi Germany would not have to fight a two-front war. (Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union would begin six weeks later.) Hess was promptly captured by locals and imprisoned for the remainder of the war. An enraged Hitler ordered that Hess be shot on sight if he ever again set foot in Germany. The British believed Hess was mad. His initial behavior at the Nuremburg Trials in 1946 seems to confirm this: Hess constantly counted on his fingers and laughed for no apparent reason. He claimed no knowledge of his days in Nazi Germany. His antics so unnerved fellow defendant Hermann Goring that Goring asked not to be seated beside Hess in the prisoners' box. Later in the tral, Hess' sanity seemed to return. Hess and six others were given life sentences, to be served in Spandau Prison in West Berlin. By 1966 the other six prisoners had been released. As Hess aged, the western Allies repeatedly asked for Hess to be released on humanitarian grounds. The Soviet Union always vetoed the request. Hess was the only prisoner at Spandau for 21 years until his curious death on August 17, 1987. He was found hanging in a garden house, strangled by an electrical wire. It was ruled a suicide. Family members doubted the accuracy of the report because by 1987 the 93-year-old Hess was so enfeebled that he could no longer tie his own shoes. Further conspiracy theories state that the man in Spandau Prison was not even Hess at all, but in fact a double. Spandau Prison was demolished after Hess' death so it would not become a shrine for Nazi sympathizers.
Tags: Nazi  Rudolf  Hess  mysteries 
Added: 14th December 2009
Views: 1955
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Harvey Haddix Tough Loss Baseball losses don't come much tougher than the one suffered by Harvey Haddix of the Pittsburgh Pirates on May 26, 1959. Pitching in Milwaukee's County Stadium against the defending National League champion Braves, the diminutive left-handed Haddix set down batter after batter. The trouble was that Milwaukee's Lew Burdette was fashioning a shutout too. After nine innings the score was tied 0-0, but only Haddix was perfect. Haddix got through 12 innings unscathed. However Milwaukee's Felix Mantilla reached first base on a throwing error by Pirates' third baseman Don Hoak to open the bottom of the 13th inning. Mantilla advanced to second base on a sacrifice bunt by Eddie Mathews. Hank Aaron was intentionally walked to set up a force play. Joe Adcock blasted an apparent home run to end the game. Aaron foolishly left the basepath after Mantilla scored. Adcock was called out for passing Aaron and only got credit for a double. The game officially went into the books as a 1-0 Braves' win. Haddix went into the books as the man who retired 36 straight batters from the start of a game--yet lost.
Tags: Harvey  Haddix  baseball  pitcher 
Added: 5th June 2010
Views: 1414
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Posted By: Lava1964
Dunblane School Shooting On March 13, 1996, unemployed former shopkeeper and former Scout leader Thomas Watt Hamilton committed one of the most dastardly crimes in the history of Great Britain. That morning Hamilton walked into the Dunblane Primary School in Dunblane, Scotland. Although Great Britain has strict gun control laws, Hamilton was armed with two 9-mm Browning HP pistols and two Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum revolvers--all legally held. He was carrying 743 cartridges, and fired his weapons 109 times. After gaining entry to the school, Hamilton made his way to the gymnasium and opened fire on Gwen Mayor's class of five- and six-year-olds (shown in the photo), killing or wounding all but one person. Fifteen children died together with Mayor who was killed trying to protect them. Hamilton then left the gymnasium through the emergency exit. From the playground he began shooting into a mobile classroom. No one was injured there because an alert teacher had warned her class to take cover under their desks. Hamilton also fired at a group of children walking in a corridor, injuring one teacher. Hamilton returned into the gym and killed himself with a bullet to the head. A further 11 children and three adults were rushed to the hospital as soon as the emergency services arrived. One of these children was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital. The motive for the shooting is unknown, but Hamilton was well known in Dunblane for being odd and creepy. He had been stripped of his scout leader credentials and his private sports clubs had been shut down by local officials because of Hamilton's alleged paedophilic tendencies toward young boys. Among the uninjured pupils at the school was eight-year-old future tennis star Andy Murray who seldom discusses that day's tragic events.
Tags: Scotland  mass  murder  Dunblane   
Added: 29th January 2011
Views: 3213
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Posted By: Lava1964
1958 New Jersey Commuter Train Disaster On Sept. 15, 1958, a horrible accident befell a commuter train shuttling passengers from New Jersey to New York City. It was a Tuesday morning after rush hour so the train had only 100 passengers--about a quarter of its capacity. Shortly following 10 a.m., Central Railroad train No. 3314 out of Bayhead stopped at Elizabethport on the western shore of Newark Bay. The train plunged off the end of an open bridge, killing 48 passengers, including a high executive from one of the larger corporations in the country and retired New York Yankees second baseman George (Snuffy) Stirnweiss. Other passengers included an investment banker carrying a brief case that contained $250,000 in negotiable bonds, a federal agent carrying a top secret device for communicating with satellites, and the mayor of a town in southern New Jersey. The accident occurred when the train plunged off the end of a bridge that had opened to allow a boat to pass on Newark Bay. Questions still remain about the accident, and why the crew ignored at least three warnings to stop and arrived at the edge of the bridge at exactly the wrong moment - sending three cars into the turbulent waters below. Although some reports suggest that the train engineer, Lloyd Wilburn, 63, suffered a heart attack before drowning as a result of the crash, the investigation later showed his train moved well above the 22-mile-per-hour speed limit for the bridge and passed through three signals notifying him and other crew members that the bridge was open ahead.
Tags: bridge  train  disaster  New  Jersey 
Added: 30th January 2011
Views: 4671
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Eddie Bennett - Baseball Mascot A hunchback or dwarf was once considered by sports teams to bring good luck. Many professional baseball teams had such a mascot. Hunchbacks were considered particularly lucky. Many players rubbed the mascot's back before batting, believing a hit was sure to follow. Eddie Bennett was such an object of luck, but he also became much more to the teams he worked for. From the beginning of his life, Eddie Bennett seemed to catch bad breaks. A childhood accident left Eddie with a crippling back injury stunting his growth and leaving him hunchbacked and permanently child-sized. His life was further disadvantaged when both his parents perished in the 1918 influenza epidemic. Crippled and orphaned, things looked bleak for the young kid from Flatbush. Eddie was a big baseball fan and frequently hung around the Polo Grounds. Happy Felsch of the Chicago White Sox took notice of the boy. Impressed by his cheery demeanor, the Sox adopted Eddie as their good luck charm. Eddie travelled with the team and they won the 1919 AL pennant. Eddie returned to Brooklyn for the 1920 season--and Brooklyn won the NL pennant that year. During the 1920 World Series, after winning two out of three games at home, the team left Eddie behind when they went on the road to play Cleveland. Without their lucky charm they promptly lost four straight games and the best-of-nine series. Eddie, dejected and offended, left the team in disgust. In 1921 Eddie latched onto the New York Yankees. Although still a good luck charm, Eddie established himself as a true professional batboy. He not only performed the typical duties of batboy, he also handled other tasks, enabling the players to focus on the game. He was a paid employee of the Yankees and took his job very seriously. Eddie ran errands for the players, procured their favorite foods, and became their confidant. Eddie was privy to every rumor and scandal regarding the Yankees during the Roaring Twenties but he kept his mouth shut. When Urban Shocker was suffering from serious heart problems late in his career, he roomed with Eddie. He honored the pitcher's wishes and kept Shocker's health issues from his teammates. Babe Ruth in particular became close to Eddie. Ruth and Bennett would enter the field early in batting practice and perform a comical warmup show. The much larger Ruth would continually throw the ball out of Eddie's reach, eventually backing him up to the backstop. Not one Ruthian homerun went by without Eddie being the first to shake his hand upon touching home plate. If you look at any team picture from 1921 to 1932, there is Eddie, front and center with a big wide grin on his face, the envy of every boy in America. In the 12 seasons Eddie was with the Yankees, they won seven AL pennants and four World Series. All this changed early in 1932 when Ediie was hit by a taxicab, breaking his leg. Due to his other health problems the injury healed slowly. By the end of the year it was clear that Eddie's fragile health was failing. Unable to perform his duties with the Yankees, he was nevertheless financially supported by team owner Jacob Ruppert for his past services to his club. But not being around the team anymore and the severe pain he suffered daily because of the accident took its toll on Eddie. He began drinking heavily. He passed away in 1935 after a three-week bender, surrounded in his room by mounds of priceless memorabilia from his years as baseball's most famous batboy.
Tags: baseball  mascot  Eddie  Bennett  Yankees  hunchback 
Added: 22nd February 2011
Views: 1909
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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