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Jon-Erik Hexum Odd Death 1984 Jon-Eik Hexum was a 26-year-old actor with a promising future when he was fatally injured on the set of Cover Up, a TV adventure series he was starring in. On October 12, 1984, the cast and crew were filming the seventh episode of the series, titled 'Golden Opportunity,' on Stage 17 of the 20th Century Fox lot. One scene called for Hexum's character to load blanks into a .44 Magnum handgun. When the scene did not go as the director had planned, there was a delay. Hexum became restless and impatient and began playing to lighten the mood. Apparently, he had unloaded all but one blank round. In what would appear to be a game of Russian roulette, at 5:15 p.m., he put the revolver to his right temple and pulled the trigger. Hexum was apparently unaware that blanks use paper or plastic wadding to seal gun powder into the shell. This wadding can be propelled from the barrel of the gun with enough force to cause severe injury or death if the weapon is fired within a few inches of the body, especially if pointed at a particularly vulnerable spot. Although the paper wadding in the blank that Hexum discharged did not penetrate his skull, the wad struck him in the temple with enough blunt force trauma to shatter a quarter-sized piece of his skull and propel the pieces into his brain, causing massive hemorrhaging. Hexum was rushed to Beverly Hills Medical Center, where he underwent five hours of surgery. On October 18, six days after the accident, Hexum was declared brain dead. With his mother's permission, his body was flown to San Francisco on life support, where his heart was transplanted into the body of a dying 36-year-old Las Vegas man at Pacific Medical Center. Hexum's kidneys and corneas were also harvested: One cornea went to a 66-year-old man with cataracts, the other to a young girl. One of the kidney recipients was a critically ill five-year-old boy, and the other was a 43-year-old grandmother of three who had waited eight years for a kidney. Skin that was donated was used to treat a 3˝-year-old boy with third degree burns. Hexum's death was ruled accidental. His mother later received an out-of-court settlement from 20th Century Fox Television and Glen A. Larson Productions, the production team behind Cover Up.
Tags: Jon-Erik  Hexum  death  gun  accident 
Added: 22nd December 2010
Views: 3267
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Harry Truman Assassination Attempt An assassination attempt on President Harry Truman occurred on November 1, 1950. It was perpetrated by two Puerto Rican pro-independence activists, Oscar Collazo and Griselio Torresola. It occurred while Truman was residing at Blair House during extensive White House renovations. The attempt resulted in the deaths of White House police officer Leslie Coffelt, and Torresola. Truman was unharmed. Torresola walked up Pennsylvania Avenue from the west side while his partner, Oscar Collazo, walked up to Capital police officer Donald Birdzell on the steps of Blair House. Approaching Birdzell from behind, Collazo pulled out a handgun, pointed it at the officer's back, and pulled the trigger. Since he had failed to cock it, nothing happened. Collazo managed to fire the weapon just as Birdzell was turning to face him, striking the officer in his right knee. Secret Service agent Floyd Boring and White House police officer Joseph Davidson heard the shot and opened fire on Collazo. Collazo returned fire and soon found himself outgunned as the wounded Birdzell joined the shootout. Soon after, Collazo was struck by two rounds in the head and right arm, while other officers joined the gunfight. Torresola approached a guard booth at the west corner of Blair House where an officer, Private Leslie Coffelt, was sitting inside. Torresola quickly pivoted from left to right around the opening of the booth. Coffelt was taken completely by surprise. Torresola fired four shots from his Luger at close range. Three shots struck Coffelt in the chest and abdomen, a fourth went through his tunic. Coffelt slumped in his chair, mortally wounded. Torresola turned his attention to plainclothes White House policeman Joseph Downs. Downs, who had just chatted with Coffelt, proceeded down the walkway to the basement door at the west end of the Blair-Lee house when he heard shots. Downs noticed Torresola, but he was shot in the hip before he could draw his weapon. Downs turned back towards the house, and was shot twice more by Torresola, once in the back and once in the neck. Downs staggered to the basement door, opened it, slid in, and then slammed the door behind him, denying Torresola entry into Blair House. Torresola turned his attention to the shoot-out between his partner, Collazo, and several other law enforcement officers. Torresola saw wounded policeman Donald Birdzell aiming at Collazo from the south side of Pennsylvania Avenue. Torresola aimed and shot Birdzell in the left knee from a distance of approximately 40 feet. Now shot in both knees, Birdzell was effectively incapacitated. (He would later recover.) Soon after, the severely wounded Collazo was hit in the chest by a ricochet shot from Davidson and was incapacitated too. Torresola stood to the immediate left of Blair House steps while he reloaded. At the same time, Truman, who had been napping in his second-floor bedroom, was awoken by the gunfire. Truman went to his bedroom window, opened it, and looked outside. From where he stood reloading, Torresola was 31 feet away from that window. It is unknown whether either man saw the other. At the same time, the wounded Coffelt staggered out of his guard booth, leaned against it, and aimed his revolver at Torresola, who was approximately 30 feet away. Coffelt fired, hitting Torresola two inches above the ear, killing him instantly. Coffelt himself died four hours later. Officer Coffelt's widow, Cressie E. Coffelt, was asked by the President and the Secretary of State to go to Puerto Rico, where she received condolences from various Puerto Rican leaders and crowds. Mrs. Coffelt always absolved the island's people of blame for the acts of the two gunmen. A plaque at Blair House commemorates Coffelt's sacrifice and heroism. The day room for the U.S. Secret Service's Uniformed Division at Blair House is also named for Coffelt.
Tags: Harry  Truman  assassination  attempt 
Added: 21st January 2011
Views: 2422
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Niagara Falls Dries Up - 1848 The photo below is an aerial view of what Niagara Falls usually looks like. But for a period of about 40 hours on March 29-31, 1848 Niagara Falls stopped. No water flowed over the great cataract for the first time in recorded history. Not surprisngly people went a little nuts. Niagara Falls was already a big tourist attraction by 1848. Villages sprouted on both the U.S. and Canadian sides of the river to accommodate the sightseeing throngs. Residents also built waterwheels to harness the Niagara River’s power to run mills and drive machinery in factories. An American farmer out for a stroll shortly before midnight on March 29 was the first to notice something. Actually, he noticed the absence of something--the thundering roar of the falls. When he went to the river’s edge, he saw hardly any water. Came the dawn of March 30, people awoke to an unaccustomed silence. The mighty Niagara was a mere trickle. Mills and factories shut down because the waterwheels had stopped. The bed of the river was exposed. Fish died and turtles floundered about. Brave—or foolish— people walked on the river bottom, picking up exposed guns, bayonets and tomahawks as souvenirs. Was it the end of the world? Perhaps it was divine retribution for what some folks thought was a U.S. war of aggression against Mexico? In an age of religious revivals, theological explanations abounded. Fearing the end of the world, thousands of people filled special church services praying for the falls to start flowing and the world to continue, or for salvation and forgiveness of their sins as the Last Judgment approached. Because communications were haphazard in 1848, no one knew why the falls had stopped. But from Buffalo, NY word eventually arrived that explained the bare falls and dry riverbed. Strong southwest gale winds had pushed huge chunks of ice to the extreme northeastern tip of Lake Erie, blocking the lake’s outlet into the head of the Niagara River. The ice jam had become an ice dam. And just as news traveled inward, news also traveled outward. Thousands came from nearby cities and towns to look at the spectacle of Niagara Falls without water. People crossed the riverbed on foot, on horseback and in horse-drawn buggies. Mounted U.S. Army cavalry soldiers paraded up and down the empty Niagara River. It was a potentially hazardous act for there was no telling when the rushing waters might return. One entrepreneur used the hiatus to do some safety work. The Maid of the Mist sightseeing boat had been taking tourists on river rides below the falls since 1846, and there were some dangerous rocks it always had to avoid. Since the river had ceased running and the rocks were in plain sight, the boat’s owner sent workers out to blast the rocks away with explosives. March 30 was not the only dry day. No water flowed over the falls throughout the daylight hours of March 31. But that night a distant rumble came from upriver. The low-pitched noise drew nearer and louder. Suddenly a wall of water came roaring down the upper Niagara River and over the falls with a giant thunder. The ice jam had cleared. To the relief of the locals, the river was running again.
Tags: Niagara  Falls  dries  up  natural  history 
Added: 21st March 2011
Views: 3321
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Second Attack on Pearl Harbor - 1942 Few American realize the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor twice during the Second World War. The second attack, on March 4, 1942, was hushed up by the military. The residents who lived in the area where the bombs fell were not even sure what had happened. Many believed it was a local defense battery practice. The intended target, Pearl Harbor, was miles away from where the Japanese bombs actually fell. Neverthless, less than 90 days after the famous December 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor attack, the Japanese attempted a second attack. On Wednesday, March 4, 1942 during the early morning hours, four 550-pound bombs were dropped on Mount Tantalus, a quiet residential section in Honolulu. The U.S. Military officials confirmed two enemy planes were responsible for the raid. The planes were Kawanishi H8K flying boats that launched from a spy base housed near the Hawaiian archipelago. There were no injuries reported or loss of life and only limited property damage. The bombs fell in a wooded section of the area, creating a large crater and shattering a few windows.
Tags: Pearl  Harbor  Second  Attack  war 
Added: 7th April 2011
Views: 5856
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
The 33-Inning Baseball Game - 1981 The longest game in pro baseball history occurred at McCoy Stadium in 1981 between the home Pawtucket (RI) Red Sox and visiting Rochester (NY) Red Wings of the AAA International League. It lasted a mind-boggling 33 innings. The game began on Saturday, April 18 and lasted 32 innings before being stopped. Play resumed on June 23. Only one additional inning was required as Pawtucket won 3-2 in the bottom of the 33rd inning. The game included future Hall-of-Famers Wade Boggs and Cal Ripken Jr. and 23 others who would eventually advance to MLB. Ominously the start of the game was delayed 30 minutes while a bank of lights was repaired. The game was tied 1-1 after nine innings. It remained knotted for the next 11 innings due to strong performances by both bullpens. In the top of the 21st inning, Red Wings' catcher Dave Huppert doubled, driving in a run giving Rochester a 2-1 lead. In the bottom of the inning, Pawtucket's Wade Boggs hit a double to score Dave Koza and tie the game 2-2. According to league rules, a curfew was supposed to take effect at 1 AM. However, plate umpire Dennis Cregg had an out-of-date rule book; it was missing that provision. Thus the game continued for 11 more scoreless innings. At 2 AM Pawtucket reliever Luis Aponte, who had pitched the seventh through tenth innings, received permission to go home. When Aponte got home at 3 AM, his wife Xiomara angrily asked, "Where have you been?" The pitcher responded, "At the ballpark." His wife snapped, "Like hell you have!" Because news of the game didn't appear in most newspapers until Monday, Aponte spent two nights on the couch. At the start of the 30th inning, the game became the longest in professional history, surpassing a 29-inning game in the Florida State League on June 14, 1966. As the game dragged on, food supplies ran out in the clubhouse and players took drastic measures to keep warm in the April chill. This included burning the benches in the bullpens and the broken bats in the dugouts. Meanwhile, Pawtucket general manager Mike Tamburro was attempting to reach IL president Harold Cooper so he could intervene. Cooper was eventually reached. Horrified, he ordered the game suspended after the completion of the current inning. At 4:09 AM, at the end of the 32nd inning, the game was stopped and would be resumed at a later date. At this point, there were just 19 fans left in the ballpark from the original 1,740. (One was the nephew of umpire Cregg. He had fallen asleep.) Each was given a lifetime pass to McCoy Stadium by Pawtucket owner Ben Mondor. As the players left the stadium they encountered people on their way to sunrise church services for Easter Sunday. Play resumed on June 23 when the Red Wings next returned to Pawtucket. On hand for the resumption was a sellout crowd of 5,746 fans, four television networks, and 140 members of the press from around the world. The game required just one inning and 18 minutes to finish. Pawtucket's first three batters singled. Dave Koza's drove home Marty Barrett. This photo shows on-deck hitter Wade Boggs congratulating Barrett as he touches the plate. The game had lasted a combined 8 hours and 25 minutes. A total of 882 pitches had been thrown.
Tags: minor  league  baseball  marathon  33  innings 
Added: 12th September 2011
Views: 2200
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
26-Inning MLB Game - 1920 The longest game (by innings) in Major League Baseball's long history was a 26-inning, 1-1 tie. It was a National League game between the Boston Braves and Brooklyn Robins played at Braves Field in Boston on May 1, 1920. Amazingly, both starting pitchers--Brooklyn's Leon Cadore and Boston's Joe Oeschger--went the distance. Since night baseball didn't begin in MLB until 1935, the game was stopped by plate umpire Barry McCormick due to impending darkness. It had to be replayed in its entirety, but all the stats from the 26-inning tie counted. Remarkably, by modern standards, the game took only 3 hours and 50 minutes to play. It had started at 3:00 p.m., as was the custom in those days, and ended at 6:50 p.m. Several players unsuccessfully lobbied umpire McCormick to extend the game one more inning so they could say they played the equivalent of three nine-inning games. The press box at Braves Field did not have electric lights so reporters and telegraphers had to submit their accounts of the record-setting game using candlelight. Some trivia from the game: The score had been tied 1-1 since the sixth inning. The attendance was about 3,500. Cadore faced 95 Boston batters. Oeschger pitched to a mere 90 Robins, but his 21 consecutive scoreless innings established a record. Braves' first baseman Walter Holke recorded the ridiculous total of 43 putouts. Boston's second baseman, Charlie Pick, set a record too, but not a positive one: His one-game total of 11 official at-bats without a hit has never been matched. Years later Cadore remembered the aftereffects of the game. "My arm stiffened. I couldn't raise it to comb my hair for three days," he said. "After seven days of rest I was back taking my regular turn. I never had a sore arm before or after the game. I suppose the nervous energy of trying to win the game gave me the strength to keep me going."
Tags: baseball  MLB  longest  game  26  innings  Braves  Robins 
Added: 13th September 2011
Views: 3256
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Brittanie Cecil - Hockey Fan Fatality At any high-quality hockey game, pucks flying into the crowd at great speeds are a common occurrence. Injuries to fans occasionally happen. Only once in the long history of the NHL has a spectator been killed as a result of being struck by a puck. The victim was Brittanie Cecil, who ironically had been given her ticket to the game as an early 14th birthday present. Brittanie, an athletic girl from West Alexandria, OH, was watching the Columbus Blue Jackets play the Calgary Flames at Columbus' Nationwide Arena on March 16, 2002. A slapshot by the Blue Jackets' Espen Knutsen was deflected by the Flames' Derek Morris. It went over the glass behind the net, striking Brittanie in the left temple. Play carried on as the players were unaware of having inadvertently caused any serious injury. Although Brittanie had suffered a skull fracture, she walked on her own power to a first-aid station before being taken to Columbus Children's Hospital in an ambulance. Her only visible injury was a gash on her forehead. At the hospital, she suffered an initial seizure and was admitted, but the next day she appeared to be recovering. Brittanie was both communicative and ambulatory, and had no complaints of pain or dizziness. A CT-scan, however, had failed to catch a torn vertebral artery, resulting in severe clotting and swelling of the brain. On March 18, she developed a high fever and lost consciousness. She died nearly 48 hours after being struck, at 5:15 p.m. on March 18, 2002, two days before her 14th birthday. Brittanie's funeral cortege drew a procession of more than 150 cars. Attending the service was Blue Jackets' general manager Doug MacLean who spoke on behalf of the team. Knutsen and Morris, the two players who combined for the fatal slapshot, expressed remorse following Brittanie's death. Morris, who deflected the puck, explained, "You try to say, 'It happens all the time,' but you can't. I don't know how many times pucks get deflected over the glass, but it doesn't make it any better. You can always say, 'It's not my fault,' but you always feel like it is, a little." Knutsen was given the option of sitting out the next game by Blue Jackets coach Dave King. He chose to play, telling reporters, "I think about it all the time. It was a terrible accident, and I cannot get it off my mind." Knutsen was so shaken by what had happened that he could not handle meeting Brittanie's family until 2010--eight years after the accident. The following season, the NHL mandated that safety netting be installed in every arena to protect spectators seated behind the goal nets. This move was initially greeted with hostility by longtime hockey fans who didn't want their view of games obstructed and who further perceived the netting as an overreaction to a freak accident.
Tags: accident  hockey  fan  puck  Brittanie  Cecil 
Added: 6th April 2012
Views: 1553
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Mike Wallace Whats My Line Controversy - 1957 On the May 26, 1957 episode of the popular panel show What's My Line?, Sammy Davis, Jr. was a last-minute mystery guest substitution for Mike Wallace. More than 20 years later, in his 1978 book about WML, executive producer Gil Fates explained what happened that night: WML panel moderator John Daly and Mike Wallace had professional differences that stemmed from the fact that they were both newsmen for ABC. Daly was ABC's newscaster while Wallace had recently been hired to do The Mike Wallace Interview program. Wallace had vaulted to fame with a series of sensationalistic and sleazy interviews on local TV in New York City--and Daly wanted nothing to do with him. Through a leak at ABC, Daly found out five hours before WML's live broadcast that Wallace was scheduled to be that night's mystery guest. He called Fates and told him he refused to do a show with Wallace. Daly was so popular and integral to WML that Fates had to find a replacement mystery guest. He quickly booked Sammy Davis, Jr., who was appearing at the Latin Quarter two blocks away from the WML studio. Everything seemingly went smoothly that night and a crisis had been averted. However, the next morning, the front page of the New York Journal-American carried this headline: "DALY BARS WALLACE: SWITCH IN GUESTS AVERTS HASSLE ON WHAT'S MY LINE?" Fates stated that there was no byline attached to the article, but its style was unmistakably that of WML panelist and gossip columnist Dorothy Kilgallen. The article ended by saying, "TV insiders claim that Daly was violently opposed to ABC's hiring of Wallace in the first place." Fates found out afterward that Dorothy had sensed something was amiss and she had "pried the details out of [WML staffer] Bob Bach." Fates went on to say, "Aside from the mechanics needed to operate the program, Daly didn't speak to Kilgallen for almost six months."
Tags: TV  Whats  My  Line  Mike  Wallace  John  Daly 
Added: 5th June 2012
Views: 8047
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Nicole Morin Unsolved Disappearance - 1985 One of the most perplexing missing persons cases in Canadian history is that of eight-year-old Nicole Morin. On Tuesday, July 30, 1985 Nicole, clad in a one-piece peach swimsuit and carrying a blanket and beach towel, left her penthouse apartment in Toronto's Etobicoke area...and vanished. She never reached the apartment's lobby where a friend named Jennifer was waiting for her. In nearly three decades there has been no trace of Nicole--who was likely abducted moments after leaving the apartment. At 10:30 a.m. Nicole had gone to the lobby of the apartment building to collect the mail. She returned to her 20th-floor apartment and got ready to go swimming with a playmate in the building's supervised outdoor pool. Before leaving the apartment, Nicole spoke to Jennifer via the building's intercom and promised to be right down. At about 11 a.m. Nicole said goodbye to her mother Jeanette, who was busy running a small daycare service she operated from her apartment. Nicole went out the door--and was never seen again. Jennifer waited about 15 minutes before buzzing the apartment again to find out why Nicole hadn't arrived at the lobby. Jeanette assumed Nicole was dawdling and was not unduly concerned. Eventually Jennifer went to the pool on her own, but Nicole never showed up. Several hours went by before Nicole's mother realized something was terribly amiss and alerted the police. A thorough search turned up no clues whatsoever. A week later the case was turned over to the homocide department. Jeanette died of a heart attack in 2007. Nicole's father, Art, who was estranged from his ex-wife in 1985 and has an ironclad alibi for that day, still clings to the unlikely hope that Nicole is alive somewhere. (She would have turned 35 on April 1, 2012.) One unsubstantiated theory Art proffered in a 2010 interview with the Toronto Star is that someone connected to his ex-wife took Nicole to prevent him from gaining custody. Well after her disappearance, a school notebook of Nicole's was found to have the tantalizing phrase, "I am going to disappear" written in it. Investigators delcared it to be a statement of childhood fantasy rather than a meaningful clue.
Tags: missing  child  Nicole  Morin  Canada 
Added: 12th June 2012
Views: 3936
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964
Ruffian Last Race - 1975 Generally considered the greatest filly of all time, Ruffian won her first ten races by an average of 8.5 lengths. A fast starter, she never trailed at any interval in any of her 10 races. Some horse racing insiders dared to say Ruffian had the potential to be better than 1973 Triple Crown winner Secretariat. Ruffian's eleventh and final race was run at Belmont Park on July 6, 1975. It was a match race between Ruffian and that year's Kentucky Derby winner, Foolish Pleasure. In the past, the two horses had shared the same jockey, Jacinto Vasquez. Vasquez chose to ride Ruffian in the match race, believing her to be the better of the two horses. (Bettors agreed; Ruffian was a 2:5 favorite.) Braulio Baeza rode Foolish Pleasure. The "Great Match" was heavily anticipated and attended by more than 50,000 spectators, with an estimated television audience of 20 million. As she left the starting gate Ruffian hit her shoulder hard before straightening herself. The first quarter-mile was run 22 and 1⁄5 seconds, with Ruffian ahead by a nose. Little more than a furlong later, Ruffian was in front by half a length when both sesamoid bones in her right foreleg snapped. Vasquez tried to pull her up, but the filly wouldn't stop. She went on running, pulverizing her sesamoids, ripping the skin of her fetlock, tearing her ligaments until her hoof was flopping uselessly. Vasquez said it was impossible for him to stop her. She still tried to run and finish the race. She was immediately attended to by a team of four veterinarians and an orthopedic surgeon, and underwent an emergency operation lasting three hours. When the anesthesia wore off after the surgery, she thrashed about wildly on the floor of a padded recovery stall as if still running in the race. Despite the efforts of numerous attendants, she began spinning in circles on the floor. As she flailed about with her legs, she repeatedly knocked the heavy plaster cast against her own elbow until the elbow, too, was smashed to bits. The vet that treated her said that her elbow was shattered and looked like a piece of ice after being smashed on the ground. The cast slipped, and as it became dislodged it ripped open her foreleg all over again, undoing the surgery. The medical team, knowing that she would probably not survive more extensive surgery for the repair of her leg and elbow, euthanized her shortly afterward. She was buried at Belmost Park with her nose facing the finish line.
Tags: Ruffian  horse  racing 
Added: 7th July 2012
Views: 2005
Rating:
Posted By: Lava1964

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