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The Comedy of Nichols and May This is one of the funniest sketches I've ever seen. It's about as close to the mother-child relationship as you can get. Mike Nichols and Elaine May created perfectly improvised scenes that were outrageously funny, yet simply understated. Their dry wit and wry satire allowed them to lampoon faceless bureaucracy and such previously sacrosanct institutions as hospitals, politics, funeral homes, and even motherhood. Like other great comedy duos, Nichols and May perfectly complemented each other. They seemed so attuned and at ease with each other that the mis-communication they often based their skits on were all the funnier. Within a short while of arriving in New York, they were the talk of the town, appearing on The Steve Allen Show, introducing a nationwide audience to a humor unlike any on television. Nichols and May spent much of the next three years traveling the country performing together on stage, radio, and television. In 1960, "An Evening with Mike Nichols and Elaine May" had opened on Broadway to rave reviews, but by 1961, Nichols and May would announce the end of their partnership. Interested in pursuing individual careers, the two left behind one of the most popular and imitated comedy acts of its time. Mike Nichols has directed and produced a variety of hit films, such as The Graduate, Silkwood, The Birdcage, Primary Colors, and The Remains of the Day. Elaine May is a two-time Academy Award nominated director, screenwriter, and actress.
Tags: mike  nichols  elaine  may  improvisational  comedy 
Added: 6th November 2007
Views: 3717
Rating:
Posted By: Naomi
DAY OF INFAMY SPEECH IN RESPONSE TO THE JAPANESE ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR 12 07 41 This address, by President Franklin D Roosevelt, given on December 8, 1941, is regarded as one of the most famous American political speeches of the twentieth century. Roosevelt's speech had an immediate and long-lasting impact on American politics. Thirty-three minutes after he finished speaking, Congress declared war on Japan, with only one Representative, Jeannette Rankin, voting against the declaration. The speech was broadcast live by radio and attracted the largest audience in US radio history, with over 81 percent of American homes tuning in to hear the president. The response was overwhelmingly positive, both within Congress and the nation.
Tags: day  of  infamy  speech  president  franklin  d  roosevelt  attack  on  pearl  harbor  december  7  1941 
Added: 6th December 2007
Views: 3521
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Posted By: Guido
The Sounds of My Childhood When I was only 3 yrs old we moved from a farmhouse in Trenton NJ to my Nonna's two story home in Brooklyn. She had a very old, but beautiful RCA Console Victrola with which she played music every day. This was such an experience for a child at that time. Opera, and Broadway musicals, my favorite became the original Broadway recording of South Pacific with Mary Martin and Ezio Pinza, and Nonna's favorite tenor, Enrico Caruso. Her music flowed through the house every day and even after all these years, I can just close my eyes and still hear it...a little bit scratchy, but a beautiful memory I don't think I'll ever forget. This song is Caruso singing La Donna e Mobile.
Tags: rca  victrolas  enrico  caruso  south  pacific  mary  martin  ezio  pinza  italian  homes  50 
Added: 21st January 2008
Views: 1666
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Posted By: Naomi
Just A Piece of Sky To me, this song must have exemplified the feelings of hundreds of thousands of Jewish immigrants on their journey to the US. Though it wouldn't be easy to leave the only homes they'd ever known, it was the only choice they had for survival.
Tags: Yentl  barbra  streisand  a  piece  of  sky  musical   
Added: 19th April 2008
Views: 1224
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Posted By: Naomi
United States Football League Sports history has shown that it is very difficult for nascent pro sports leagues to challenge old, established ones. Nevertheless, there are entrepreneurs always willing to try. From 1983 through 1985 the United States Football League existed as a spring/summer league. The USFL was the brainchild of David Dixon, a New Orleans antique dealer. In 1980, Dixon commissioned a study by Frank Magid Associates that found promising results for a spring and summer football league. He'd also formed a blueprint for the prospective league's operations, which included early television exposure, heavy promotion in home markets, and owners willing to absorb years of losses—-which he felt would be inevitable until the league found its feet. The USFL secured television contracts from both ABC and ESPN. The league also was able to sign several collegiate stars--most notably Herschel Walker who was still an underclassman. Mostly, however, the public responded with yawns. Television ratings and overall attendance were below expectations. Teams often spent far more than the proposed $1.8 million salary cap to land big-name players. In three seasons, 23 different teams played under the USFL banner. The Breakers were a typical USFL franchise, operating in three different cities (Boston, New Orleans, and Portland) over the three years. Teams typically wallowed in debt. The San Antonio Gunslingers were in such dire straits that some players, whose pay checks had bounced, were exchanging their complimentary game tickets for food and were boarding at the homes of sympathetic fans. The USFL was dealt its death blow in a courtroom in 1986 when it won an antitrust lawsuit versus the National Football League--but the jury awarded the USFL only $3 in damages. Still, some USFL innovations were evenutally adopted by the NFL. These included the two-point conversion, the use of instant replay to assist officials, and a salary cap.
Tags: USFL  football 
Added: 21st November 2009
Views: 1296
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Posted By: Lava1964
Orphan Trains The Orphan Train was a social experiment that transported children from crowded coastal cities of the United States to the country's Midwest for adoption. The orphan trains ran between 1854 and 1929, relocating an estimated 200,000 orphaned, abandoned, or homeless children. At the time the orphan train movement began, it was estimated that 30,000 vagrant children were living on the streets of New York City. Two charity institutions, The Children's Aid Society (established by Charles Loring Brace) and The New York Foundling Hospital, determined to help these children. The two institutions developed a program that placed homeless city children into homes throughout the country. The children were transported to their new homes on trains which were eventually labeled 'orphan trains.' This period of mass relocation of children in the United States is widely recognized as the beginning of documented foster care in America. Two future governors (John Green Brady of Alaska and Andrew Burke of North Dakota) were orphan train passengers.
Tags: orphan  trains  CAS 
Added: 14th February 2011
Views: 1351
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Posted By: Lava1964
Baseballs Lost Teams This is an informative short feature about three MLB teams that were in existence for half a century but found new homes in the 1950s: the St. Louis Browns, the Boston Braves, and the Philadelphia Athletics.
Tags: MLB  lost  teams  defunct 
Added: 2nd January 2014
Views: 1469
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Posted By: Lava1964
Queen of Mean Convicted, 1992 Leona Helmsley, nicknamed the "Queen of Mean" by the press, receives a four-year prison sentence, 750 hours of community service, and a $7.1 million tax fraud fine in New York. For many, Helmsley became the object of loathing and disgust when she quipped that "only the little people pay taxes." Leona's husband, Harry, was one of the world's wealthiest real estate moguls, with an estimated $5 billion to $10 billion in property holdings. The couple lived in a dazzling penthouse overlooking Central Park and also maintained an impressive mansion in Greenwich, Connecticut. Leona, who operated the Helmsley Palace on Madison Avenue, was severely disliked by her employees. Though they lavishly furnished their homes and hotel, the Helmsleys were curiously diligent about evading the required payments and taxes for their purchases. Much of their personal furniture was written off as a business expense, and there were claims that the Helmsleys extorted free furnishings from their suppliers. Contractors were hardly ever paid on time-if at all-and many filed lawsuits to recover even just a portion of what they were owed. Leona reportedly also purchased hundreds of thousands of dollars of jewelry in New York City but insisted that empty boxes be sent to Connecticut so that she could avoid the sales tax. Given her offensive personality, many were quite pleased by Leona's legal troubles. Even celebrity lawyer Alan Dershowitz could not win her immunity from the law. Following her conviction, Federal Judge John Walker publicly reprimanded her, saying, "Your conduct was the product of naked greed [and] the arrogant belief that you were above the law." Leona Helmsley was sent to jail in 1992 and was released in 1994. In 2002, Helmsley, whose husband Harry died in 1997, again found herself in court after being sued by Charles Bell, a former employee who accused Leona of firing him soley because he was homosexual. A jury ordered Helmsley to pay him more than $11 million in damages. Helmsley died in August 2007 at age 87. She famously left $12 million to her dog, Trouble.
Tags: News 
Added: 4th December 2014
Views: 789
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Posted By: WestVirginiaRebel
Willie Mays Apartment - 1954 This photo really is out of the past. It was taken in 1954, the year Willie Mays dominated the National League and would be named its MVP. It shows him in his small apartment in the Harlem section of New York City. The woman in the photo is his landlady/cook. It is slightly misleading, though. Mays was among the highest paid players in MLB in 1954, but while the Giants were in New York, Mays chose to live in Harlem as a simple tenant. When the Giants moved to San Francisco, Mays bought luxurious homes. (He also got himself into big financial troubles because his worldly, socialite wife was a spendthrift.)
Tags: Willie  Mays  MLB  apartment 
Added: 20th September 2013
Views: 1680
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Posted By: Lava1964
Heinz Homestyle Gravy Tags: Heinz  Homestyle  Gravy  No  Lumps  1980s  1986  80's  TV  husband  wife  cooking 
Added: 25th September 2015
Views: 689
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Posted By: BigBoy Bob

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