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The U.S.S. Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor July 2007 I went to Hawaii this summer in July and we made it a point to stop at The U.S.S. Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor. I took this picture from atop the memorial. The memorial sits atop the sunken vessel. 1177 sailors are entombed in the sunken vessel. You have to take a short boat ride over to the Memorial and not one person spoke a word while on the memorial, even children were silent. It was a powerful moment for me and I choked up with tears. The Arizona went down with tons of oil and it still seeps up to the top today. May those who perished on that fateful day on December 7, 1941 rest in peace!
Tags: hawaii  WWII  Attack  Arizona  sailors 
Added: 19th August 2007
Views: 2756
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Posted By: dezurtdude
1974 - Japanese WWII Soldier Finally Surrenders Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese soldier, refused to believe the Second World War had ended--and continued his mission of clandestine sabotage for twenty-nine years. On December 26, 1944, Onoda was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. His orders were to hamper enemy activity on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life. When he landed on the island, Onoda joined forces with other Japanese soldiers. The officers in the group all outranked Onoda, which prevented him from carrying out his assignment. United States and Filipino forces retook Luband Island when they landed on February 28, 1945. Within a short time, all but Onoda and three other soldiers had either died or surrendered. Onoda, who had been promoted to lieutenant, ordered the men to take to the hills. Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers (Akatsu, Shimada and Kozuka). Although hostilities ceased in August 1945, Onoda and his comrades were oblivious to Japan's unconditional surrender. Thus the foursome carried out guerrilla activities, killed some 30 Filipino citizens, and engaged in several shootouts with the police for years. As early as 1945 Onoda saw a leaflet saying the war had ended, but he and his comrades thought it was enemy propaganda. They continued their bloody raids against local farmers and police. Even leaflets from General Tomoyuki Yamashita of the Fourteenth Area Army failed to convince the maverick soldiers to capitulate. One of the four, Yuichi Akatsu, walked away from the others in September 1949 and surrendered to Filipino forces in 1950 after six months on his own. In 1952 letters and family pictures were dropped from aircraft urging the remaining three to surrender, but they concluded it too was a ruse. Shimada was shot in the leg during a gun battle with local fishermen in June 1953. Onoda nursed him back to health. On May 7, 1954, Shimada was killed by a shot fired by a search party. Kozuka was killed by two shots fired by local police on October 19, 1972, leaving Onoda alone. He and Onoda were burning local farmers' rice harvest as part of their guerrilla activities. On February 20, 1974, Onoda met a young Japanese man, Norio Suzuki, who was on a personal quest to find him. Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out..." Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter. The Japanese government located Onoda's commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had become a bookseller in civilian life. On March 9, 1974, Taniguchi met with Onoda and persuaded him to surrender. Onoda turned over his sword, his rifle (still in working order), 500 rounds of ammunition, and several hand grenades, as well as a dagger his mother had given him in 1944. Though he had killed numerous civilians since the war's end, Onoda received a pardon from Filipino president Ferdinand Marcos. Upon his return to Japan, Onoda was uncomfortable with his celebrity status and the erosion of traditional Japanese values. Onoda moved to Brazil where he became a successful cattle rancher. He occasionally returned to Japan to promote conservative causes, including organizing educational camps for wayward Japanese youths. As of December 2013, Onoda was still alive at age 91.
Tags: WWII  Japanese  soldier  surrenders  1974 
Added: 28th December 2013
Views: 827
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Posted By: Lava1964
Pearl Harbor December 7 1941
Tags: Never  Forget! 
Added: 5th December 2007
Views: 1189
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Posted By: Marty6697
DAY OF INFAMY SPEECH IN RESPONSE TO THE JAPANESE ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR 12 07 41 This address, by President Franklin D Roosevelt, given on December 8, 1941, is regarded as one of the most famous American political speeches of the twentieth century. Roosevelt's speech had an immediate and long-lasting impact on American politics. Thirty-three minutes after he finished speaking, Congress declared war on Japan, with only one Representative, Jeannette Rankin, voting against the declaration. The speech was broadcast live by radio and attracted the largest audience in US radio history, with over 81 percent of American homes tuning in to hear the president. The response was overwhelmingly positive, both within Congress and the nation.
Tags: day  of  infamy  speech  president  franklin  d  roosevelt  attack  on  pearl  harbor  december  7  1941 
Added: 6th December 2007
Views: 2864
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Posted By: Guido
America Comes of Age The Korean War America Comes of Age - The Korean War Like Lambs to the Slaughter US defense spending had reached a modern day low. The military was ill-prepared and ill-equipped, those in authority embraced questionable doctrines. From a post World War II soft life in Japan, with servants to wash their clothes and shine their boots, these American youth were suddenly uprooted and flung into harm's way. There was no "Remember Pearl Harbor." The North Korean People's Army was on a roll. The North Korean People's Army had invaded the Republic of Korea in South Korea only 11 days earlier and overwhelmed the ill-equipped Republic of Korea armed forces. The North Korean People's Army steamrolled into Seoul, driving refugees and regrouping Republic of Korea Army units before it, clogging roads and throwing the countryside into a panic. The invasion caught General Douglas MacArthur and his Far East Command and Eighth Army by surprise, despite recent intelligence reports that North Korea was planning for an attack on the Republic of Korea. General MacArthur had disregarded the reports, saying he did not believe war with North Korea was imminent. The events that unfolded on the Korean peninsula some 45 years ago offer a telling reminder of what happens when a force goes to war unprepared. Disaster lurks around every bend. Facing a force of 130,000 NKP soldiers, 3,000 Soviet advisors, a full array of heavy weapons, aircraft and the formidable T-34/85, arguably the best tank to come out of World War II. American GIs fought bravely at times. At other times when confronted with overwhelming, numerically superior forces, they "bugged-out" to the rear, cursing their government for sending them to this stinking, God-forsaken place where human feces were used to fertilize the land. Photos The Library of Congress The Korean War National Museum U.S. Army Center of Military History Democratic People's Republic of Korea Audio Clips The Library of Congress - Veterans History Project Wessel's Living History Farm Music Perry Como Far Away Places Aaron Copeland Fanfare for the Common Man John Williams Saving Private Ryan Omaha beach Hymn to the Fallen conceived and produced by: Dale Caruso For more information about the Korean War http://www.army.mil/cmh/ http://www.korea50.mil/ http://americanradioworks.publicradio... http://www.paulnoll.com/Korea/index.html http://www.loc.gov/vets/ http://www.koreanwar.org/html/units/2...
Tags: Korean    War    1950 
Added: 25th September 2008
Views: 1048
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Posted By: dalecaruso
Pearl Harbor Memorial to the sailors who lost there lives on that dreadful day.
Tags: Never  Forget  7  December  1941 
Added: 6th December 2008
Views: 755
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Posted By: Marty6697
Pearl Harbor Day....Did We almost Forget Tags:   pearl    harbor    world    war    two    december    seventh    1941     
Added: 7th December 2008
Views: 1106
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Posted By: Cliffy
Halifax Explosion On December 6th of 1917, the worst pre atom bomb explosion in history occured in Halifax NS. Two ships, the Imo, and munitions ship the Mont Blanc collided in the Halifax harbor, and within 10 minutes, the Mont Blanc was ablaze, and the explosion took place about 25 minutes after that, at approx. 9:05 AM. The top picture was taken about 15 to 20 seconds after the blast from 21 kilometers away, The bottom picture is 2 days following the devastation, with the Imo shipwrecked in the harbor about mid picture. It is estimated about 2000 lives were lost, and without the help of train dispatcher Vince Coleman, who lost his life in the blast, more would have died as a passenger train from here in Saint John was expected to arrive in Halifax momentarily. Mr. Coleman sent a warning via Morse Code stating, "Stop trains. Munitions ship on fire. Approaching Pier 6. Goodbye",and would not stop until he recieved a message back from the train. Mr. Coleman saved about 300 lives, but lost his own due to his heroism.
Tags: halifax  explosion  1917 
Added: 15th April 2009
Views: 1049
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Posted By: nbmike
D-Day Crossword Puzzle Security Breach In the spring of 1944 the Allies were poised to land in German-occupied France. The only uncertainty was where and when. Tight security over the enormous operation was paramount. (One American general was demoted and sent back to the Unites States for merely speculating on an invasion date at a social gathering.) Accordingly, British Intelligence was aghast when several key code names linked to the D-Day invasion began appearing as answers in the Daily Telegraph crossword puzzles in the month before the June 6 invasion. The code names of all five beaches (Gold, Sword, Juno, Omaha, Utah), the portable harbors (Mulberry), the naval support (Neptune), and the entire operation (Overlord) appeared! Agents questioned Leonard Dawe, a 54-year-old local schoolmaster, who had submitted the puzzles. Dawe didn't know what the fuss was about. He told the agents the words simply fit the puzzles. For years the incident was regarded as a remarkable coincidence. However, in 1984, one of Dawe's former students at the Strand School shed more light on the subject. Ronald French, who was 14 in 1944, said Dawe routinely had his students fill in crossword grids as a mental exercise. Dawe kept the especially good grids, wrote accompanying clues, and submitted them to the Daily Telegraph. The boys often socialized with the Allied troops stationed nearby and likely acquired the words by overhearing their conversations. There is no evidence that Dawe was a German agent, nor is there any evidence that the Germans benefitted from this odd security breach.
Tags: crossword  puzzle  D-Day  WWII  security 
Added: 25th November 2009
Views: 3572
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Posted By: Lava1964
PEARL HARBOR ATTACK SCENE Original pearl harbor attack scene from 2001 movie YOUR WELCOME!
Tags: pearl    harbor    bombing    japan    attack    wwii    boats    bombs  special  effects 
Added: 7th December 2009
Views: 2612
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Posted By: Old Fart

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